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1 GEORGE EDWARD LITTLEWOOD

George Edward Littlewood, son of Martin and Ann Cook Littlewood was born August 27, 1854 in Salt Lake City, Utah.
He married Eliza Adams, daughter of Samuel and Elizabeth (Bessie) Mountford Adams in 1876. She was born June 8, 1852 in Norton, England. They lived in Meadow, Utah. He had a shop on Main Street where he mended anything made of leather. He was the church custodian for years and rang the bell punctually every Sunday for meetings. He played in the band and was a caller for the square dances.
For years he freighted cheese from the Meadow Creamery to Salt Lake City. The trip took several days, camping three or four days on the way. In Salt Lake they camped at a common camp ground on Main Street with water troughs for the horses and places where they could build fires for cooking. George often took someone with him for company and on one trip Eliza went with him. She became ill and died in Provo, Utah, August 29, 1910.
George married Minnie Ellen Bond, daughter of Jesse and Sarah Adams Bond, November 1, 1911. They were among the first in Meadow to own a phonograph with cylindrical records and a big horn. They welcomed everyone to listen to it.
George and Eliza had seven children: Eliza Ann, born July 5, 1877, died March 10, 1948; Dora Jane, born February 10, 1879, died July 11, 1955; George Edward, born April 16, 1881, died May 19, 1907; Sarah Bessie, born March 5, 1883, died August 13, 1892; Emma Minetta, born June 14, 1885, died August 24, 1893; Samuel Henry, born December 7, 1887, died December 8, 1887; Minnie Ethel, born March 15, 1890.
George Edward died June 26, 1929.

Biography obtained from the Daughters of the Utah Pioneers, Fillmore, Utah, Territorial Statehouse Museum. 
Littlewood, George Edward (I34915)
 
2

~BAPTISM: Also shown as Baptized 8 Aug 1921 
Pickett, Mary (I31905)
 
3

~ENDOWMENT: Also shown as Endowed 5 Apr 1961, LANGE.

~SEALING_PARENTS: Also shown as SealPar 2 Jan 2009, SGEOR. 
Smith, Hannah (I177626)
 
4 Elsa Clara Wohlgemuth, known as “Elsie” to her friends and family, was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin on June 21, 1913. Her parents were from Germany, so she grew up speaking German in her home. However, she also learned English as a child and did not have a German accent when speaking English. Elsa was the oldest of five children, and she helped watch her younger siblings while her mother worked in a shoe factory. She enjoyed going to plays and singing with her sister Viola and her brother. Her cousin, Arnold, was one of her best friends growing up.
The Great Depression hit during Elsa’s teenage years, which made it hard for her family to get good food to eat. For breakfast, they would eat day-old sweet rolls, and for dinner they ate sprouted potatoes, which did not have very much nutrition left in them. Her family moved to Turtle Lake, North Dakota after she graduated High School. There, she attended the Jamestown Teachers College.
While living in Turtle Lake, she met Elder Ashby, a missionary serving in North Dakota for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. He fell in love with her very quickly, but wanting to keep the mission rules, he did not tell her about his feelings for her until after his mission. However, he found reason to visit her family’s house many times during his mission, and was invited by her Uncle Chris to eat Thanksgiving dinner with them. After Maiben Bennet Ashby finished his mission, he went to school and wrote to Elsa. After a correspondence of one and a half years, Maiben and Elsa were married and sealed in the Manti Temple on August 24, 1936. They moved to Cedar City, Utah, where Maiben went to school. It was a bit hard for Elsa to leave her family behind in North Dakota. Elsa gave birth to her first child, Maiben Bennet Ashby, Jr., on July 17, 1937, but he died the next day. This was really hard on Elsa and Maiben. Maiben got a job in St. George, Utah, so they moved to St. George. There, Elsa gave birth to five more children: Arnold, Viola, Selma Ann, Karen, and Elsa.
As a mother, Elsa taught her kids many things. They were taught to speak properly. If they did not know what a word meant or how to pronounce it, Elsa would tell them to look it up in the dictionary that was kept on a shelf by the door. When my grandma, Viola, was a narrator in her school program in first grade, Elsa helped her learn her lines and practice them so she could get the right inflection in her voice. The children were taught the importance of saying “please” and “thank you” and not to impose on people’s privacy. They were also taught to keep the commandments. Elsa was also very good at listening to her children and letting them tell her about school and about their problems, and she would just listen. My grandma said she really appreciated that.
Elsa was good at sewing. She would make Halloween costumes for her girls out of crepe paper, which she gathered into ruffles and sewed onto a shirt, with a crepe paper ruffle hat to go with it. She taught her children how to sew. She was a bit of a perfectionist, so every seam had to be perfectly straight. If it was not straight, the child would have to take it out and try again. She also taught Viola how to embroider. The children also took piano lessons, and Elsa would sit them down after their lesson to hear their songs and make sure they were playing them correctly.
Elsa liked to read and sing, liked good, classical music, and enjoyed artwork and plays. She had a beautiful voice and sang alto in the Singing Mothers Relief Society choir. She got to go with the choir one year to sing in the General Conference in Salt Lake City with some other Relief Society choir groups. The family would take trips to Los Angeles, California, to go to the cemetery and look at the artwork around it, as well as Huntington Park and Mansion, which had gardens and an art gallery. Elsa never learned how to drive a car herself. Maiben tried to teach her a few times, but she never got her license. Instead, once the children started getting their drivers’ licenses, they became the chauffeurs for the younger children and their mother. Elsa always made sure her children wore their seat belts when they drove. They always made sure to lock the car when they got out of it.
Elsa did not teach her children to speak German, but she enjoyed speaking German with her mother and sister when they came to visit her. Later, her children Viola and Arnold served missions in Germany and learned German there. Maiben’s mother came to live with Elsa’s family towards the end of her life. Elsa was not sure if she would have the strength to have Maiben’s mother come live with them. Elsa’s health was poor, and she was not sure if she would have the energy to cook for all of them, but then she felt the presence of her father-in-law, who had died the year before, and knew that it would be all right for Maiben’s mother to come.
Due to Elsa’s poor health most of her life, she often did not have strength to do things. Maiben was a Bishop for many years, and Elsa liked to go to church, but often she would get all ready to go, and then have to get back in bed because she no longer had the strength to go anywhere. She also did not have energy to do much cleaning, but she was very good at getting clothes very clean. She would scrub clothes on the washboard before putting them in the washer, which made white clothes get really white and clean. After they were washed, she hung them outside to dry. Eventually, the children learned how to do their own laundry. They also learned to do dishes and other chores. Maiben would sing songs with the kids while they did dishes, and put curlers in the girls’ hair before they went to bed when Elsa was not feeling well enough.
Elsa was very proper and liked to look nice. She was always slender and liked feminine clothes, such as things with lacy collars, a fitted waist, belts, and cameo jewelry. She also liked to curl her hair. She had pretty short hair, and before bed, she would wrap it around a cylinder clip, put in bobby pins, take out the cylinder, wrap a bandana around her hair, and then go to sleep. Then her hair would be curled for the next day.
Because Elsa did not have very good health, she did what she could to stay healthy. She ate very healthy foods and served them to her family too. They had a garden and a couple goats in their backyard, as well as some grapevines and pomegranate bushes. They ate vegetables from their garden. Their salad was often lettuce that they would pour milk sweetened with sugar on top of, so it was almost like a soup. They also ate fried eggplant, beans cooked in a pressure cooker, and many different squash dishes. One was called “Squash Surprise,” which was boiled, mashed squash with cream cheese mixed in, and a walnut in the middle of each serving (that was the surprise). Elsa also juiced carrots and beets and boiled other vegetables which she served with eggs or cheese for dinner (lunch). If Elsa was serving a vegetable that the children did not like, then she would also serve dessert for those who ate the vegetables. She made good chocolate chip cookies, which were shared evenly between the family members. Supper often included potatoes, and they had a pot roast about once a week. If there were onions in a dish, Elsa liked to put in plenty of onions. She liked meat to be really tender. Maiben made gravy to go with potatoes, and it was usually very thick. Elsa was a night person and did not get up very early in the mornings, so Maiben usually made breakfast for the children. It was usually cracked wheat or oatmeal. If the children were ever still hungry after mealtime, there was always homemade whole wheat bread that they could eat to finish filling them up. Elsa drank goat’s milk from the goats they had because it was easier on her stomach. When there was extra goat’s milk, she would put it in a pot and let it sit for a few days until it got sour and separated. Then she put it in a cheesecloth and made cheese out of it. She was also good at making a graham cracker crust, and she would use the goat cheese to make cheesecake. There was not usually extra goat’s milk, so she did not get to make cheesecake very often.
Elsa got dementia later in life, and had a stroke two years before her death, so she could not get out of bed very often, but her family loved her and took care of her. She died May 23, 2003 in St. George, Utah. Elsa lived to be 89 years old and got to see her grandchildren and many great-grandchildren. She was a wonderful lady and mother, and showed love to those around her, and her children still remember her with love. 
Wohlgemuth, Elsa Clara (I42295)
 
5 Ann Jane Lupton was born in Liverpool, England on Sept. 23, 1850. Her parents were William Lupton and Mary Fielding. They lived at Toxteth Park, Liverpool. She was known all of her life as "Annie." Very little is known about Annie's childhood except that her grandparents, the Fieldings, were wealthy. She could remember as many as 30 hams hanging in the chimney at one time. Women were hired to cook, and there was enough to last for weeks. Her parents belonged to the Church of England. They stayed all day when they went to church.
Annie's first marriage was to John Coltman in about 1873. Her husband drank. Due to brutal treatment, she lost twins(born dead three months premature). A son, Harry, was born Aug. 26, 1876 in London. Annie left her husband when she found she was going to have another child, and lived in a double house with friends. Her former husband threatened to kidnap Harry. She had to leave him alone with the door locked, while she went to the store.
Annie's mother, Mary Fielding, had cousins, Mercy Thompson and President Joseph F. Smith, in Salt Lake City, Utah, who sent money for her and her daughter's passage to America. "Aunt" Mercy Thompson lived on the corner of 2nd West and lst North. Mary, Annie, and Harry left England in April 1878. Six weeks after they arrived in Salt Lake City, Annie's second son, Joseph Fielding, was born July 15, 1878. They lived in a little house between Thompsons and Aunt Edna Smith's home on 2nd West.
When her baby was six weeks old, Annie took in washing and dried and sold fruit. President Joseph F. Smith and his wife Edna were very good to Mary Fielding Lupton and Annie. All of her life, Annie visited with Edna and her family.
It was at Aunt Mercy's that Annie met John Heward, a friend of the Thompsons. He lived at Draper, Utah. His wife had died, and most of his children were married. John was over thirty years older than Annie. They were married July 25, 1879, in the Salt Lake endowment House. They took Annie's children and her mother to Draper with them to live. John Heward's home was across from the Draper Ward house. Six of John's children from his first wife were living. The youngest child was 20, almost as old as Annie. John Heward adopted Annie's two boys and later they had two children of their own: William, born April 29, 1880; and Mary, who was born July 11, 1884.
Annie's husband, John, died May 1890 from cancer of the ear. Mary was nearly six years old. Annie's mother had died in 1886, not long after they moved to Draper. Annie was left a widow with four small children, at the age of 40. Annie then grew fruits and vegetables, made butter, and sold(peddled) them in Sandy. She rode in an old buggy and drove a horse named Nellie, a sorrel. Annie sold some of John's land and built a home that cost $900.00. Part of the home is still standing at Draper. Annie's mother ran the old Draper Coop Store. It was a dry goods store. Later, David O. Rideout built a larger store north of the little store. After Mary Fielding died, Annie and her children helped run the store.
Mary Lupton Heward, Annie's daughter was married in 1910 to Arch Stokes. He built three brick, adobe lined rooms on to Annie's home. They lived there until they moved to Burley, Idaho. Annie and Mary missed each other very much. They had been together constantly, ever since Mary had been born. She wrote faithfully to Mary and her children.
Ann then rented her part of the house and moved into the new part. She lived aloone here except for short visits to see her children. Ann "Annie" Jane Lupton Heward died on June 23, 1925.



Ann was known all her life as Annie. After her death, my mother Mary, found her birth certificate revealing a new name--Ann Jane. She was born in Liverpool, England, Sept. 23,1950. Her parents were William Lupton and Mary Fielding.
She told mother very little of her childhood, except that her grandparents were wealthy. She could remember as many as 30 hams in the chimney at one time. Women were hired in who cooked and washed enough to last for weeks. They belonged to the Church of England. They stayed at church all day.
Ann's first marriage was to ______Coltman, in about 1873. Her husband drank. Due to brutal treatment she lost twin babies which were born at 6 months. Harry, a second child was born Aug. 26, 1878 in Liverpool. "Annie" then left her husband and lived in a double house with friends. Her husband threatened to kidnap Harry, so she had to lock the door while she went to the store.
"Aunt Mercy Thompson" a relative in Salt Lake City, Utah sent money to her. Ann and her child and her mother, Mary F. Lupton came to Utah about June 1878. They lived in a little house on 2nd West between Aunt Mercy's and Edna Smith's , wife of Pres. Joseph F. Smith. Pres. Joseph F. Smith, Aunt Mercy, and Mary Fielding Lupton were cousins.
Ann had only been here six weeks when Joseph Fielding was born, July 15, 1878. When the baby was only six weeks old Ann took in washing and dried fruits to sell for a living.
The Smith family were very good to Mary Fielding, Ann and her children. Ann and Edna were very close friends.
Ann met John Heward, a friend of the Thompson's , at Mercy Thompson's. He was 66 years old and she was 29. They were married July 25, 1879 in the Salt Lake Endowment House.  
Lupton, Ann Jane (I175392)
 
6 ABRAHAM FREER CARLING
(wife, Ann Elizabeth Ashman Carling)

By
Marilyn Brunson, 1936, and Dora C. Robinson, 1949, granddaughters
And from his own notes

Abraham Freer Carling was born August 19, 1837, in Poughkeepsie, Duchess County, New York to John and Emeline Keaton Carling. He was raised with four brothers and two sisters.
When he was three, the family moved to Nauvoo, Illinois, where they joined the L.D.S. Church. About this time Abraham’s mother died and a few years later his father married Ann Green Dutson, a widow. They had two children, Frances Caleb and Joseph M. Abraham joined the Nauvoo Legion and became handy with rifle and sword. Here also, he saw and heard the Prophet Joseph Smith many times.
In 1845 the family moved to Winter Quarters where Abraham was baptized in the Missouri River. Here he worked at farming, gardening and herding cows. Often, whole herding cows, the Indians would steal his dinner and try to pick his pocket.
At the age of fifteen he and his father crossed the plains with the Henry Miller Company along with Apostle Orson Hyde. Near the Black Hills they met a tribe of 4000 Sioux Indians who seemed to rise up out of the earth. The three chiefs leading the Indians met Captain Miller. He requested that the Indians be ordered to the side of the road so as not to stampede the two-mile long train. The Indians obeyed this request at once, and as the train moved by the chiefs, [the] Mormons gave cups of sugar and flour and loaves of bread to them in appreciation for the Indian’s good behavior. These Sioux were on their way to Laramie to receive their Annuity from the government.
On the way, Abraham saw thousands of buffalo, a few of which were killed by members of the train and used for food.
The Saints arrived in Provo in 1852, and in 1853 the Indian War commenced. George A. Smith was Captain of the Army. He called for volunteers who were under age promising them the same rights granted to the regulars. In the fall of 1953 Abraham’s company was sent to Fillmore to strengthen that post because of the many U.S. Surveyors who were slain near Gunnison on the Sevier River. In 1855 Abraham’s father, a member of the Legislature, died leaving Abraham to take care of his stepmother and her family.
The family moved to Fillmore and then went to Deseret where Abraham helped survey and helped put in the first dam and head gate. From here, in 1862, he was called on a mission to bring emigrants across the plains. He had put $1000 into the Deseret Dam, and lost it all when the dam went out.
While on this mission Abraham met Ann Elizabeth Ashman, who rode in the third wagon behind him. They got acquainted and would meet around the campfires at night with the other Saints. They were married when they reached Salt Lake City in 1862 by Bishop Edward Hunter. They raised fifteen children, thirteen of which reached maturity. The children’s names were John, Ann Elizabeth, Abraham Freer, Sarah Ellen, Emeline, George, Joseph, Frank, Harriet, Edward, Ernest, Catherine Keaton, Isabella, Elmer, and Lehi. This big family all married and settled in Fillmore and contributed to the town in both social and civic affairs.
Abraham had a severe fever when he was seventeen and lost all his hair. He had several wigs, one of which was made from his wife’s hair. While going to church one day a whirlwind came up and took his wig far into the air. This was great sport for the children who saw it!
Abraham proved to be a faithful father and husband. As an exceptional butcher he always provided them with fresh meat. He raised a splendid garden and fruit orchard. He also made brooms and candles. He aided in building the Old State Caption Building. Abraham was a staunch Church member and a full tithe payer. He was a deacon, a High Priest and head teacher under Bishop Anderson for six years. He never missed his church duties, no matter what the weather.
Three or four years before he died, Abraham had a stroke, which left him without speech. He died of heart trouble January 2, at age 74.




































ANN ELIZABETH ASHMAN CARLING
By
Dora Robison, granddaughter, 1946

Ann Elizabeth Ashman was born in London, England December 20, 1837, to John and Ann Wilde Ashman. She was the oldest of five children. Her father was a mason by trade and a Methodist minister converted to Mormonism. For a long time after his conversion, his wife was bitterly opposed to it, but finally consented for his sake.
At the age of six Ann and her sisters had to work in the Lace Factory. When she was sixteen her father decided to send her to America. John felt if he could send one of his children first, then his wife would want to go. Ann was sent in the charge of Reuben McBride, a Utah missionary who was laboring in England. It was agreed that she should stay with his folks until her parents could come, as they were without means to make the trip at the time.
This was a very serious decision for Ann. One night as she lay in her bed, she saw two lights and an open book (The Book of Mormon). She had never seen one quite like it. Right then Ann decided she should go.
Ann Elizabeth left England on Waster Sunday, 1862, on John Boyd’s ship under the direction of James T. Brown with 700 other Saints. After six weeks they arrived in New York. She joined the Henry Miller Company going to Utah and met one of the teamsters, Abraham Freer Carling. He liked this little English girl very much, and asked her to marry him when they reached Salt Lake City. Ann decided if she got married, she would then have a home for her people when they could come. Ann and Abraham were married September 28, 1862 in Salt Lake City. Abraham paid her $40 immigration fee and they went to Fillmore to make their home.
After two years a small inheritance from an uncle was left to Ann’s parents. The money was used for all of them to come to America. When they arrived in Fillmore, Ann and Abraham were living in a one-room log cabin in the northwest end of town. They had one son, John. Soon after their arrival her parents began to build a home across the street on land Abraham had purchased for them. Hr father built a rock house, which was a two-story building with a porch on the east side. It was considered a very beautiful home at that time and still stands in Fillmore.
In later years Ann and Abraham built them a two-room log house. Many parties were held there. They were members of Fillmore’s first choir and remained members for forty years. Ann received a blessing for her constant choir work, which said she would always have a representative of her family in the Fillmore Choir. They lived their religion in every way, the one big thing they had strived for all their lives.
Their family consisted of fifteen children. Edward and Lehi died in their teens of a fever. The rest grew up and married in Fillmore. Ann and Abraham lived all their married lives on the lot where they raised their family. Their trials were many with this large family, but they never missed paying their tithes and always had family prayer.
Abraham died in 1912 leaving Ann to carry one. Ann died October 3, 1921 at the age of 83, a true Christian mother.

Biography obtained from the Daughters of the Utah Pioneers, Fillmore, Utah, Territorial Statehouse Museum. 
Carling, Abraham Freer (I17474)
 
7 Birth: Salem LDS Ward Record F027,307 pt. 1. Curtis, Josephine Matilda (I173106)
 
8 Birth: Salem LDS Ward Record F027,307 pt. 1. Endowed Archive Record Stamp Baptized TIB Curtis, Eliza Jane (I173103)
 
9 In Donald Benson Alder and Elsie L. Alder, comp., The Benson Family: The Ancestory and Descendants of Ezra T. Benson (The Ezra T. Benson Genealogical Society, Inc., 1979), 224
Lucinda West was the widow of Joseph West. She was born 22 Oct 1826 at Ulysses, Seneca, New York, the daughter of William and Elizabeth Barton. Lucinda West received her patriarchal blessing 9 Sept 1845 by Joseph William Smith in Nauvoo, Illinois. Lucinda was endowed by the name of Lucinda West at Nauvoo 21 Jan 1846, and she was sealed to Ezra T. Benson 18 March 1847 at Winter Quarters, Indian Territory. This was solemnized by Pres. Brigham Young, witnesses, Heber C. Kimball and O. Pratt.

Joseph West was born 23 June 1822 in Venango County, New York, the son of Alva West and Sally Benedict. Joseph West became a carpenter on the Nauvoo Temple; also he was set apart as an ordinance worker in the Nauvoo Temple, 7 Feb 1846.

Joseph West died in 1846, place unknown.

Nothing further is known of Lucinda West Benson. It is not known whether she crossed the plains or not.

 
Burton, Lucinda (I122735)
 
10 Killed in a battle Agnarasson, Alrek King of Sweden (I40261)
 
11 My dad was a welder at Geneva Steel. He was a hard worker and very talented. He was always working in the garage making dunbuggy's or go garts, fixing and painting cars. His greatest accomplishment was inventing the first motorhome for us. He converted a small laundry tuck into a motorhome. he moved up to a larger one (linen truck converstion)
We camped all the time and he had a love of hunting. As a child we had to eat everything they killed (Ugg) Jack Rabbit, pheasant, deer and we fished. My grandfather EH Palmer and he built our home and then later made an addition adding the garage and master bedroom/familyroom when I was 7 years old. I am the middle child (Janet) and the only girl. My older brother Terry and younger brother Craig. My Dad loved to BBQ dinner and have many family gatherings in our back yard. He was very close to his step brother, Horace, Lamar,Allen. He is the only child born of his mother Gladys Loveridge Clark Nielsen. And William Nielsen. We spent many family vacations and Sunday dinners with them. My dad did love to travel. During my younger years my dad and mom were members of the Civil air patrol, they served many rescue missions. When I turned 11 yrs old, unfortunatley my fathers drinking became a problem. My teenage years I watched him change . I married in 1970 and shortly after my older brother Terry Lee Nielsen married Rosemary. He was killed in Vietnam in 1971. After that my dads drinking became worse and my mom divorced him. She remarried and so did my dad. He married Gail. He later retired from Geneva and Died of complications of liver disease. 
Nielsen, Dewey Carl (I59887)
 
12 She was a pioneer she came on the Harris Pratt Company. Davis, Jane Thompson (I163612)
 
13 Spencer Niles came from Rhode Island in 1790, and his son, Russell, was then ten years old. He died March 29, 1852, at the age of seventy two years.

W. E. Niles was born in the township of Pownal August 30, 1845, and is now engaged in the general mercantile business at Pownal Center. He was appointed postmaster June 1, 1876, and continued in office until July, 1887. He was elected lister in 1876, and served five or six terms, and has been poormaster since 1878, and is now selectman. His parents were Benedict C. and Laura A. (Raymond) Niles. Mr. Niles was born in this township February 10, 1811, and Mrs. Niles was a native of the town of Stamford.

W. E. Niles was married September 27, 1866, to Sarah McGray, of Scotch descent. They have had two children: Benedict W., and Minnie B. Benedict W. graduated from the Drury Academy at North Adams, Mass. in 1888, and from the Albany Law School June 23, 1889. Minnie B. graduated from the Drury Academy at North Adams in 1889.

From:
HISTORY OF BENNINGTON COUNTY, VT, WITH ILLUSTRATIONS AND BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF SOME OF ITS PROMINENT MEN AND PIONEERS; EDITED BY LEWIS CASS ALDRICH, 1889


He died from a fall from a tree in Vermont.  
Niles, Spencer (I175922)
 
14 Worked as a lumber man, He and Mary were maried 4/25/1882 with Charles Yanisch and Anna Marek as attendances. they drove to Red Wing for the ceremony with a team of horses and a lumber wagon. Proksche, Frank (I155918)
 
15 !SOURCE: Email from N. Combs to the Whipple Website, 10 Aug 2001. Norma writes:

"Let me offer some primary sources (Bible records and Arnold's VR) on the inconsistency of who Barbara Rice, d/o Elnathan (Whipple) and John Rice married. This Barbara Rice was born April 24, 1706 in Warwick (Arnold's VR) and married John Langford on May 11, 1727 in East Greenwich, RI (Arnold's VR). Births of six of their children are recorded in East Greenwich, RI (Arnold's VR).

The Barbara Rice who married Benjamin Arnold was born March 18, 1723/24 (Arnold Bible records copied 1936 by Josephine Keefer Short and available at the RI Historical Society). She was the daughter of John Rice, Jr. (1696-1746/7), the s/o John and Elnathan (Whipple) Rice, and Avis Tibbetts (d. 1760), making her the niece of the first Barbara Rice and still a Whipple descendant.


SOURCE: "Descendants of Elnathan Whipple," email from N. Combs to the Whipple Website, 24 Feb 2003. Cites Arnold Bible (2) (birth, marriage); Rhode Island Cemeteries Database Index (death, burial).

Burial: "Benjamin Arnold Lot, Warwick, RI; removed to Greenwood Cemetery, Fairview Ave., Coventry, RI." --N.A. Combs, 24 Feb 2003. 
Rice, Barbara (I26717)
 
16 "Hon. Bazaleel Taft, senior, was born in 1750, and died in 1839, in the 89th year of his age. For many years he had been one of the leading men in the south part of Worcester County, and the tokens o'f the confidence of his fellow-citizens, while they imposed upon him the burdens of life, strengthened him for their faithful fulfillment. He was two years a member of the State senate; two years a member of the executive council, and some years a member of the house of representatives from Uxbridge. He was a strong and decided Federalist, and never swerved from his political faith. Firm, compad:, honest, dignified and able, he went through life fulfilling his various duties with rare fidelity and conscientiousness, and leaving to his family and to all who knew him, a character which is always referred to with reverent pride and pleasure. He became a large land holder in his native town, and the old homestead is yet in the hands of his descendants. The stately elms which shelter the home, of the patriarch, built of timber hewn by his own hands, and firm as the hills around, are emblematic of the man whose memory is embalmed in the hearts of his friends and kindred." Nor can I pass from this notice of Bazaleel, senior, without a reference to his Revolutionary history, which I have received from my friend, the Hon. Henry Chapin, as given in an address delivered by him some ten or eleven years since to the citizens of Uxbridge.
"In the Revolutionary war, Bazaleel Taft, senior, went with a company collected in his neighborhood to Rhode Island in the capacity of orderly sergeant. Having made his first report, he happened to be within hearing, when the commanding officer read his report, and as he finished it, exclaimed, 'Who wrote that report. Mr. Taft, supposing that possibly he had been guilty of some breach of military rules, and that he might be arrested — slipped out to attend to some matters, but he had not been absent long before he was summoned by an inferior officer to come before the commander. Said the commander, 'Is your name Bazaleel Taft?' 'It is, sir.' 'Did you make that report? ' I did make it. I was not very familiar with military matters, but I did it as well as I could.' Instead of a reprimand, he was electrified by the announcement, 'Mr. Taft, I wish to have you act in the capacity of Adjutant of these troops. You may enter at once upon the duties, and you shall have a horse as soon as one can be furnished by the government.' "

Bazaleel Taft, senior, was grandson of the first Daniel Taft, and must have been eleven years of age in 1761, when his grandfather Daniel Taft died. His first wife was Abigail Taft, by whom he had one Child, a daughter, whose name was Eunice. Eunice became the wife of Dea. Phineas Chapin, and the mother of Mrs. Paul Whitin, of Whitinsville, — a lady who is remembered with veneration and affection by all her descendants. His second wife was Sarah Richardson.
His only son who lived to majority, was Bazaleel Taft, Junior."
https://archive.org/stream/taftfamilygather1874uxbr/taftfamilygather1874 u xbr_djvu.txt 
Taft, Barzillai (I7742)
 
17 "I was born on a farm in a log house in Dwight Township, Huron County, Michigan on June 29, 1872. I worked on my father's farm until the spring of 1896 when I left home to do for myself. I went to Gladstone, Michigan and worked in a store and saw mill until October of the same year. I then went to work for the Soo Line Railway at Gladstone, Michigan. I worked in the Round House for 20 months as an engine wiper, fire builder, storehouse keeper until I was promoted to locomotive fireman from about June 1898 until March 1903 when I was promoted to locomotive engineer and have been running an engine of the largest type ever since. October 11, 1899 I married the sweetest little girl in Wisconsin and if you don't think so just ask our 3 boys. Her name was Cora Estelle Maxfield of Plover, Wisconsin, Portage County."

Charles was a very large and strong person. When in his prime he weighed 195 pounds. He was 5'11" tall and was very large boned. He had a reach from finger tip to finger tip of 84" (7 feet). He could chin himself 20 times with one arm. As a young man he helped with the chores on his father's farm. He often told how he would crawl under a colt every day and lift the colt on his back. He continued to do this until the colt became a full grown horse weighing approximately 1000 lbs. until one day he missed. After that day he was no longer able to lift the horse.

He was a very kind person and was good to everyone. He was very thoughtful of his Cora and often brought her gifts for no special reason. He enjoyed being engineer on the special picnic train that went to Buffalo, Minnesota. Walter remembers well riding in the engine on that train and also on the train that went to Rhinelander, Wisconsin. On that train they would go from Minneapolis to Rhinelander, stay overnight and over Sunday, then return on Monday to Minneapolis. When Charles was growing up there was no radio and no television. For fun he participated in seeing who could go hand over hand on a rope from the ground to the top of the 2 1/2 story barn and back down in the shortest length of time. Every Sunday he would wrestle with his brother Dave out behind the barn. Dave was 5 1/2 years older. Dave was always able to pin his brother. Finally one Sunday Charles pinned Dave and after that Dave would not wrestle his brother.

When he was sixteen, Charles worked in the lumber camps during the winter. One time to get to the camp he had to walk 30 miles in a snow storm with a fifty pound pack on his back. His normal walking speed was about 4 miles per hour.

In his later years, Charles was never more than 15 lbs. above his prime weight of 195 lbs.

Charles Robert Whitchurch died in his sleep October 26, 1942 and was interred in the wall of the Sunnyside Cemetery in Long Beach, California. When placed in the casket he had to be placed partly on his side because his shoulders were so broad that he couldn't be laid flat.

One of the remarks he used to make was: "Always push yourself away from the table when you are still a little hungry." We should all be following this good advise.

From the papers of Walter and Phyllis Whitchurch. 
Whitchurch, Charles Robert (I122846)
 
18 "I, Orson Nephi Bangerter, was born in a two-room adobe house with a dirt roof. About seventy yds. south of the house was a large hollow and a large barn was built on the north side. Then, about 150 feet north was an irrigating ditch, which at times had fish in it. When I was five years old, I made a net of burlap sack with a hoop, catching about five dozen fish on my fifth birthday. Feb 1890, I with my parents, moved to Bountiful, also joined the different auxiliary organizations. I was baptized in the old Mill pond Mar 28, 1893 [by Heber Holbrook] and was confirmed the same day. In 1899 and 1900 I attended the LDS College in Salt Lake City, Utah. In 1903 I was ordained an Elder by Hyrum Sessions and joined the 2nd Quorum of Elders in the Davis Stake in 1904. I worked in the Temple for the dead.

In Feb 1904 I received a call to go on a mission to Switzerland, leaving Feb 24, 1904 for Europe, where I was successful in learning the language of my mother tongue. After twenty eight months, I again returned home July 16, 1906. July 17, 1905, I went outsight [sic], seeing in different parts of Switzerland and Italy.

Sept 26, 1906, I was married to Edith White in the Salt Lake Temple. O c t 15, 1906, I joined the 28th Ward in Salt Lake City and was a ward teacher from Nov 1, 1906 to June 1907. In July I moved back to Bountiful, Utah, where I continued as a truck gardener until this time. There were six children born to us."

--from the Genealogical Record of Orson Nephi Bangerter 
Bangerter, Orson Nephi (I4708)
 
19 "In the year 1842 President Joseph Smith sought an interview with me, and said, ‘I have a message for you, I have been commanded of God to take another wife, and you are the woman.' … He asked me if I believed him to be a Prophet of God. … He fully explained to me the principle of plural or celestial marriage … that it would prove an everlasting blessing to my father's house. … [Joseph encouraged her to pray] 'that the grave would kindly receive me that I might find rest on the bosom of my dear [recently deceased] mother … Why Should I be chosen from among thy daughters, Father I am only a Child in years and experience.' And thus I prayed in the agony of my soul. … [The marriage] was not a love matter—a t least on m y part it was not, but simply the giving up of myself as a sacrifice to establish that grand and glorious principle that God had revealed to the world." Walker, Lucy (I88156)
 
20 "Ma" to family and friends. Charlene was born in Preston, Idaho and raised in Logan, Utah the devoted daughter of Curly and Ivy Lohman. Parents sister Audry and brother Bill affectionately called her "muggins". H e r husband Robert "Daws" Simpson preceded her in death. Ma & PA met and fell in love while attending their alma mata, Utah State. They both became aggie and Utah fans. They loved traveling and playing golf in Utah and in Mesa, Arizona where they lived during the cold Utah winters. Together they built a home on Beacon Drive. Ma had a talent for decorating her home with special touches. She also loved to cook all kinds of special dishes, She was a stylish lady with beautiful gray hair - a classy woman years ahead of her time. She worked as one of the first women to sell Real Estate in Utah. A longer version of this is contained in the obituary DTD April 19,2002. Lohman, Charlene "Muggins" (I136705)
 
21 "Mary Frew Ellsworth: 'Aunt Mary,' as every one called her, was born in Scotland, August 27, 1854. She came to Utah with her parents with David McArthur's handcart company in 1856. She came to Payson (Utah) in 1874. She was the first woman in Payson to manufacture ice cream. She made and sold ice cream for forty years. For many years she was in business on Main Street, and later continued the business at her home. Aunt Mary's ice cream became widely known."--Kate Carter
 
Frew, Mary (I174571)
 
22 "One Sunday, in the year 1888, as my father and mother were taking us home from Sunday School, he stopped the carriage in front of a tent a photographer had set up for a few days there in Eden, Utah, and had our pictures taken. My youngest sister, Emma, then five years old, sat for the picture on a little chair in front center between father and mother, also seated on chairs. She had her little doll sitting beside her on the floor. My father's name was Jens Peter Andreasen while my mother's name was Ingeborge Catherine Mouritzen. In the rear of father and mother stood the other four children, I, Veta Elfreda Patra, then eleven years old, stood on the right of my father with my hand on his right shoulder, while my brothers, Charles Jensen, (the only Child by my mother's first husband Frantz Jensen) and Anthon Andreasen stood on my left with my sister Inga Catherine on their left. The suit my father was wearing was made by hand by my mother. She owned one pair of scissors, one thimble and two needles. Always, while she was sewing, she would sing the song that went like this: "Tomorrow the sun may be shining although it is cloudy today. Why worry or fret, complaining, there will be a way open if you will." Father was about 48 1/2 years old when this picture was taken. He was the ward clerk and president of his priesthood quorum. He would read out l oud to my mother every night. Mother was 46 1/2 y ears old. She made the dress she was wearing by hand. She was the secretary of the Relief Society of the L.D.S. Church in the Town of Eden and took care of music. Her voice had a perfect pitch. When I was fourteen years of age I was the organist. Anthon, then 12 1/2 years old, later went to Weber college (Acadamy) in Ogden, Utah, and filled a mission to Denmark when he was 24 years of age. The dress I was wearing was made by Rozella Ferrin Larkin' s mother, Mrs. Moroni Ferrin, while the dress my 7 1/2 year old sister Catherine was wearing, as well as the one my five year old sister Emma was wearing was made by my mother."

When my brother, Charles Jensen, was twenty-one years old, he left home for Nevada, where he drove a stage coach from Wells to Elko, carried the mail, using four horses on the coach. He was a wonderful person with horses. Later he married Bertha, Rudolph Klinkie's sister, whom he lost at the birth of her second Child. Her first Child was named Alma Jensen (Murphy - John) She was my daughter Mary's age. She lives one hundred miles south of Wells, Nevada, in a town named Arthur. One year after the family picture was taken, Jens Peter Andreasen, my father, went to Denmark on a two year mission. While on his mission my mother became very ill with an abscess on her chest. We three sisters sat up all night taking turn s in treating of the abscess with oatmeal poultices and seeing to it that she got good food. She was bed-ridden for two months. Old Adam Peters on came over three or four times during that winter with a basket of delicious food. My brother Anthon was about fourteen and one-half years old and it was my responsibility to help him with the milking."
By Elfreyda Andreasen Malan 
Andreasen, Inga Catherine (I21787)
 
23 "One Sunday, in the year 1888, as my father and mother were taking us home from Sunday School, he stopped the carriage in front of a tent a photographer had set up for a few days there in Eden, Utah, and had our pictures taken. My youngest sister, Emma, then five years old, sat for the picture on a little chair in front center between father and mother, also seated on chairs. She had her little doll sitting beside her on the floor. My father's name was Jens Peter Andreasen while my mother's name was Ingeborge Catherine Mouritzen. In the rear of father and mother stood the other four children, I, Veta Elfreda Patra, then eleven years old, stood on the right of my father with my hand on his right shoulder, while my brothers, Charles Jensen, (the only Child by my mother's first husband Frantz Jensen) and Anthon Andreasen stood on my left with my sister Inga Catherine on their left. The suit my father was wearing was made by hand by my mother. She owned one pair of scissors, one thimble and two needles. Always, while she was sewing, she would sing the song that went like this: "Tomorrow the sun may be shining although it is cloudy today. Why worry or fret, complaining, there will be a way open if you will." Father was about 48 1/2 years old when this picture was taken. He was the ward clerk and president of his priesthood quorum. He would read out l oud to my mother every night. Mother was 46 1/2 y ears old. She made the dress she was wearing by hand. She was the secretary of the Relief Society of the L.D.S. Church in the Town of Eden and took care of music. Her voice had a perfect pitch. When I was fourteen years of age I was the organist. Anthon, then 12 1/2 years old, later went to Weber college (Acadamy) in Ogden, Utah, and filled a mission to Denmark when he was 24 years of age. The dress I was wearing was made by Rozella Ferrin Larkin' s mother, Mrs. Moroni Ferrin, while the dress my 7 1/2 year old sister Catherine was wearing, as well as the one my five year old sister Emma was wearing was made by my mother."

When my brother, Charles Jensen, was twenty-one years old, he left home for Nevada, where he drove a stage coach from Wells to Elko, carried the mail, using four horses on the coach. He was a wonderful person with horses. Later he married Bertha, Rudolph Klinkie's sister, whom he lost at the birth of her second Child. Her first Child was named Alma Jensen (Murphy - John) She was my daughter Mary's age. She lives one hundred miles south of Wells, Nevada, in a town named Arthur. One year after the family picture was taken, Jens Peter Andreasen, my father, went to Denmark on a two year mission. While on his mission my mother became very ill with an abscess on her chest. We three sisters sat up all night taking turn s in treating of the abscess with oatmeal poultices and seeing to it that she got good food. She was bed-ridden for two months. Old Adam Peters on came over three or four times during that winter with a basket of delicious food. My brother Anthon was about fourteen and one-half years old and it was my responsibility to help him with the milking."
By Elfreyda Andreasen Malan 
Andreasen, Emma Elvera (I21788)
 
24 "Painter of the American Revolution"; aide-de-camp of General George Washington for 19 days in 1775. Trumbull, John (I98232)
 
25 "Paxton Houston died soon after coming to maturity, of consumption, in Blount County, Tenn." Houston, Paxton (I95395)
 
26 "William Ostler was born in Bridport, Dorset, England, 3 March 1835. His parents had a son born to them just two years before, (1833), whom they had given the name William, but the Child only lived for a few days. They were so happy when the next son came that they named him William also." taken from the book - John Ostler and Sarah Endacott Gollop, their descendants and ancestors, compiled by Mary L. Teerlink, great-grand daughter of John Ostler and Sarah Endacott Gollop. The middle name of Gollop or Golakher were probably added at some time to tell the difference between the 2 Williams. The 1833 dates for this William are wrong. They are the correct dates for the older William that died as an infant. Ostler, William Golakher (I164370)
 
27 (1) SUSANNA SKELTON IS THE 2ND WIFE OF JOHN MARSH OF SALEM, MA, MARRYING HIM IN ABOUT 1646. THEY ARE THE PARENTS OF 8 CHILDREN. VIEW BIOGRAPHICAL ITEMS ATTACHED AS STORIES (MEMORIES) TO THIS RECORD (KN7S-K18)
(2) See also BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION ABOUT JOHN MARSH AND HS FAMILY, INCLUDING FIRST WIFE (NAME UNKNOWN) AND SECOND WIFE, SUSANNA SKELTON:
Robert Charles Anderson, in his biographical sketch about this John Marsh in the outstanding historical series, "The Great Migration..." (See Source attached to this record for publication data), indicates that the origin [birth, christening & parent data] of this John Marsh is unknown. Do not confuse this John Marsh of Salem, MA with contemporary John Marsh who settled in Hartford, CT and is believed to be the one born in Braintree, Essex, England. The John Marsh of Hartford, CT had a brother, Joseph, who was a clothier in Braintree, Essex, England, where he made his will, on 22 May 1676, in which he mentions several of the children of that John Marsh of Hartford, CT.
Anderson suggests that this John Marsh was born by 1612, based upon estimated date of marriage. He immigrated from England to New England on the ship "Mary and John," which sailed on 24 March 1633/1634, having enrolled at Southampton as a passenger. There is some indications that he may have taken an oath of allegiance to the crown just prior to leaving England.
His first residence in New England was at Salem, Massachusetts Bay Colony. In the 1636 division of land at Salem, he received 20 acres. Subsequently he was granted half an acre for a household of three in the December 1636 distribution and an additional ten acres in the January 1638/1639 distribution.
The occupation of John Marsh was being a cordwainer (a shoemaker or cobbler). His inventory when he died included shoemaking tools. On 10 Nov 1655 he was appointed a Salem sealer of leather. That he had some education is indicated by his signing of documents and having books in his inventory. Apparently he was appointed the Constable in Salem in 1657.
John Marsh may not have been a member of the church in Salem initially, as he was admitted to the church on 12 May 1639. He was made a Freeman, which implied church membership, on 26 Feb 1649/1650.
There is no record of the name of the first wife of John Marsh, who he probably married in about 1636. Apparently she died sometime after the birth of daughter Ruth in 1641 and prior to his remarriage in about 1645.
The second wife of John Marsh was Susanna Skelton, who he had married by 1646. . Susanna was a daughter of Samuel Skelton and Susanna Travis, who arrived in Salem in 1629 where Samuel Skelton was chosen the minister when the first church in the Massachusetts Bay Colony was organized on 20 July 1629. Susanna was baptized (christened) in Tattershall, Lincolnshire, England. After the death of John Marsh, she was remarried to Thomas Rix by 1685.
CHILDREN OF JOHN MARSH AND HIS FIRST WIFE:
1. Zachariah Marsh, bp. Salem on 30 Apr 1637.
2. John Marsh, bp.Salem on 29 May 1639.
3. Ruth Marsh, bp. Salem on 5 May 1641
CHILDREN OF JOHN MARSH A AND SUSANNA SKELTON:
4. Elizabeth Marsh, b. Salem 8 July 1646, bp. there 13 Sep 1646.
5. Ezekiel Marsh, bp. Salem 29 Oct 1648.
6. Bethiah Marsh, bp. Salem 1 Sep 1650.
7. Samuel Marsh, bp. Salem 2 Oct 1652.
8. Susanna Mash, bp. Salem 22 May 1654.
9. Mary Marsh, bp. Salem 14 Sep 1i656.
10. Jacob Marsh, b. Salem 6 Aug 1658, bp. there 19 Apr 1659.
11. Benjamin Mash,b. Salem abt 1660.
John Marsh's will was dated 28 March 1672 and probated 26 November 1674. Some sources give 19 Nov 167;4 as the date of his death. Susanna made her will on 3 Nov 1685 and it was recorded on 14 Nov 1685. …

Obituary
Birth: Apr. 3, 1620
Tattershall
Lincolnshire, England
Death: May 12, 1695
Salem
Essex County
Massachusetts, USA

Susanna Skelton was born on 3 Apr 1620 in Tattershall, Lincolnshire, England. Susanna was the daughter of Rev. Samuel Skelton (1591-1634) and Susanna (Travis) Skelton (1597-1631).

Susanna arrived in Salem, Massachusetts in 1629 with her parents, sister and brother. She was 9 years old.

Susanna married John Marsh, III (1611-1674) in Salem, Essex, MA in 1645.
John and Susanna Marsh were the parents of the following known children: Mary Marsh, Susanna, Samuel, Benjamin, Jacob, John, Elizabeth, Zachariah, Bethia, Ezekiel and Ruth Marsh.

Susanna (Skelton) Marsh died on 12 May 1695 in Salem, Essex, Massachusetts, United States. She was 75 years old. Her burial information is unknown. 
Marsh, John (I3196)
 
28 (Lund’s in America: From Denmark to Utah Territory – In FamilySearch.org under Books)
Elvera “Vera” was born 13 March 1886 in Sollested, Denmark, and the eleventh of twelve children to Rasmus Hansen Lund and Petrine Jensen. Her family was quite well off. They ran Uranineborg Inn, and had other endeavors. In 1887 the Lund Family joined the LDS Church. In 1889, four of the Lund sons, Marius, Alfred, Adolph and Hannibal came to the Utah Territory. One brother, Hannibal, passed away shortly after they arrived of Typhoid. In 1893, the rest of the Lund Family came to the Utah Territory. They had a business on State Street, R.H. Lund & Sons. Two years later the family sold the business in Utah and bought a farm in Pleasant Grove. Her parents later moved to Cresent City, Utah
Vera married James Alfred Davis, 11 December 1906, in Provo, Utah. He was the son of pioneer parents, Warren Edgar Davis, Jr. and Almira Stoker who were part of the Isaac Stewart Company arriving in the Salt Lake Valley in 1852. James was born 31 October 1881 in Spanish Fork, Utah County, Utah. James was first married to Clara Agnes Brockbank on 2 October 1903. Her father Samuel Broadbank, was a half-brother to Elizabeth Brockbank Bushnell, Great Grandmother to Dayle Duncan White, wife of Clyde Lund White, grandnephew of Elvera Camilia Lund. Eight children were born to James and Vera while they were living in Pleasant Grove, Spanish For k and then Salt Lake City. James was 25 and Vera was 20 when they were married. They lost a baby boy, William, born 15 February 1918 and died 16 February 1918. Seven of their children were raised to adulthood and married. James died 29 December 1961 and was buried 2 January 1962. He was a widower as Vera died 6 June 1960 in Salt Lake City, Utah and was buried 9 June 1960. 
Lund, Elvira Camilla (I4964)
 
29 (Supplied names only)

SOURCE: Email from Cherry Bamberg (bamberg at tiac dot net) to the RIGEN W EB-L mailing list, 12 Jan 1998. Gives birth and death dates and places.

SOURCE: "Descendants of Elnathan Whipple," email from N. Combs to the Whipple Website, 24 Feb 2003. Cites Vital Record of Rhode Island, 1636-1850 (birth, marriage); West Greenwich Town Council Records (death). 
Sweet, Philllip Jr (I26871)
 
30 .Joseph Clark and Alice came to America in 1640 and settled at Dedham. He went to Medfield when he was selectman in 1660. Hannah Adams, the pioneer of American literary women (the historian), and Lowell Mason, the music writer and teacher, were born in Medfield and were descendants of Joseph Clark. The cellar hole where Clark's house was was visible in 1886. William S. Mills Clark, Joseph (I3631)
 
31 10th President of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

Joseph Fielding Smith Jr. (July 19, 1876 – July 2, 1972) was an American religious leader and writer who served as the tenth president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) from 1970 until his death in 1972. He was the son of former church president Joseph F. Smith and the great-nephew of LDS Church founder Joseph Smith.

Smith was named to the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles in 1910, when his father was the church's president. When Smith became president of the LDS Church, he was 93 years old; he began his presidential term at an older age than any other president in church history. Smith's tenure as President of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles from 1951 to 1970 is the third-longest in church history; he served in that capacity during the entire presidency of David O. McKay.

Smith spent some of his years among the Twelve Apostles as the Church Historian and Recorder. He was a religious scholar and a prolific writer. Many of his works are used as references for church members. Doctrinally, Smith was known for rigid orthodoxy and as an arch-conservative in his views on evolution and race, although it has been said that age had softened him and as a result he put up less resistance to reforms by the time he had become president. 
Smith, Joseph Fielding Jr (I51589)
 
32 11th Governor of New Hampshire. Pierce, Governor Benjamin Jr (I90940)
 
33 11th President of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

He was eleventh president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) from July 1972 until his death in December 1973.

Lee was born in Clifton, Idaho, to Samuel Lee and Louisa Emeline Bingham and was the second of six children. The Lee family lived the rural life and Lee and his siblings spent most of their youth doing farm chores. During his childhood, his mother saved him from several near-death experiences. When he was eight, he was sent to get a can of lye from the shelf and spilled the deadly product all over himself. His mother opened a vat of pickled beets and poured cup after cup of the red vinegar all over him, which neutralized the lye. When Harold was a teen, he punctured an artery on a broken bottle. His mother cleaned it, but it became badly infected. She burned a black stocking to ashes and rubbed it in the open wound and it soon healed.

Lee was fortunate to receive a good education. He finished eighth grade at a grammar school in Clifton and his parents allowed him to continue his education at Oneida Stake Academy in Preston, Idaho. The first few years, Lee focused on music and played the alto, French, and baritone horns. Later, he played basketball and was a reporter for the school newspaper. He graduated in the spring of 1916.

The summer following his graduation Lee worked to receive his teaching certificate from Albion State Normal School at Albion, Idaho. After two summers of study in 1916 and 1917, Lee passed the state's fifteen-subject test to receive his second- and third-class certificates. Lee held his first teaching position in the fall of 1916. He taught a class of 25 students, grades one to eight, in Weston, Idaho. His salary was $60 a month. When he was eighteen, he became principal of a school in Oxford, Idaho. In September 1920, then church president Heber J. Grant called Lee on a mission to the western states, with headquarters in Denver, Colorado. He was twenty-one and served until December 1922. 
Lee, Harold Bingham (I89574)
 
34 12th President of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

Spencer Woolley Kimball (March 28, 1895 – November 5, 1985) was an American business, civic, and religious leader, and was the twelfth president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church). The grandson of early Latter-day Saint apostle Heber C. Kimball, Kimball was born in Salt Lake City, Utah Territory. He spent most of his early life in Thatcher, Arizona, where his father, Andrew Kimball, farmed and served as the area's stake president. He served an LDS mission from 1914 to 1916,[where?] then worked for various banks in Arizona's Gila Valley as a clerk and bank teller. Kimball later co-founded a business, selling bonds and insurance that, after weathering the Great Depression, became highly successful. Kimball served as a stake president in his hometown from 1938 until 1943, when he was called to serve as a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles.

Like most other LDS Church apostles, Kimball traveled extensively to fulfill a wide variety of administrative and ecclesiastical duties. Early in his time as an apostle, Kimball was directed by church president George Albert Smith to spend extra time in religious and humanitarian work with Native Americans, which Kimball did throughout his life. He initiated the Indian Placement Program, which helped many Native American students gain education in the 1960s and 1970s while they stayed with LDS foster families.

In late 1973, following the sudden death of church president Harold B. Lee, Kimball became the twelfth president of the LDS Church, a position he held until his death in 1985. Kimball's presidency was noted for the 1978 announcement ending the restriction on church members of black African descent being ordained to the priesthood or receiving temple ordinances. Kimball's presidency saw large growth in the LDS Church, both in terms of membership and the number of temples. Kimball was the first church president to state publicly that the church expects all able-bodied male members to serve missions in young adulthood, resulting in an increase in missionary service. 
Kimball, Spencer Woolley (I89397)
 
35 12th President of the United States.

Zachary Taylor (November 24, 1784 – July 9, 1850) was an American military leader who served as the 12th president of the United States from 1849 until his death in 1850. Taylor previously was a career officer in the United States Army, rising to the rank of major general and becoming a national hero as a result of his victories in the Mexican–American War. As a result, he won election to the White House despite his vague political beliefs. His top priority as president was preserving the Union. He died sixteen months into his term, having made no progress on the most divisive issue in Congress, slavery.

Taylor was born into a prominent family of plantation owners who moved westward from Virginia to Louisville, Kentucky, in his youth; he was the last president born before the adoption of the Constitution. He was commissioned as an officer in the U.S. Army in 1808 and made a name for himself as a captain in the War of 1812. He climbed the ranks of the military, establishing military forts along the Mississippi River and entering the Black Hawk War as a colonel in 1832. His success in the Second Seminole War attracted national attention and earned him the nickname "Old Rough and Ready".

In 1845, during the annexation of Texas, President James K. Polk dispatched Taylor to the Rio Grande in anticipation of a battle with Mexico over the disputed Texas–Mexico border. The Mexican–American War broke out in April 1846, and Taylor defeated Mexican troops commanded by General Mariano Arista at the battles of Palo Alto and Resaca de la Palma, driving Arista's troops out of Texas. Taylor then led his troops into Mexico, where they defeated Mexican troops commanded by Pedro de Ampudia at the Battle of Monterrey. Defying orders, Taylor led his troops further south and, despite being severely outnumbered, dealt a crushing blow to Mexican forces under General Antonio López de Santa Anna at the Battle of Buena Vista. Taylor's troops were subsequently transferred to the command of Major General Winfield Scott, but Taylor retained his popularity.

The Whig Party convinced a reluctant Taylor to lead their ticket in the 1848 presidential election, despite his unclear political tenets and lack of interest in politics. At the 1848 Whig National Convention, Taylor defeated Winfield Scott and former Senator Henry Clay for the party's nomination. He won the general election alongside New York politician Millard Fillmore, defeating Democratic Party candidates Lewis Cass and William Orlando Butler, as well as a third-party effort led by former president Martin Van Buren and Charles Francis Adams, Sr. of the Free Soil Party. Taylor became the first president to be elected without having served in a prior political office. As president, Taylor kept his distance from Congress and his Cabinet, even though partisan tensions threatened to divide the Union. Debate over the status of slavery in the Mexican Cession dominated the national political agenda and led to threats of secession from Southerners. Despite being a Southerner and a slaveholder himself, Taylor did not push for the expansion of slavery, and sought sectional harmony above all other concerns. To avoid the issue of slavery, he urged settlers in New Mexico and California to bypass the territorial stage and draft constitutions for statehood, setting the stage for the Compromise of 1850.

Taylor died suddenly of a stomach disease on July 9, 1850, with his administration having accomplished little aside from the ratification of the Clayton–Bulwer Treaty. Vice President Fillmore assumed the presidency and served the remainder of his term. Historians and scholars have ranked Taylor in the bottom quartile of U.S. presidents, owing in part to his short term of office (16 months), though he has been described as "more a forgettable president than a failed one". 
Taylor, President Zachery (I92609)
 
36 13th President of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

He was an American farmer, government official, and religious leader who served as the 15th United States Secretary of Agriculture during both presidential terms of Dwight D. Eisenhower and as the 13th president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) from 1985 until his death in 1994.

Born on a farm in Whitney, Idaho, Benson was the oldest of eleven children. He was the great-grandson of Ezra T. Benson, who was appointed by Brigham Young to be a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles in 1846. When he was 12 years old, his father was called as a missionary to the midwestern United States, leaving his expectant mother alone with seven children. Benson took much of the responsibility for running the family farm and in the words of his sister, "He took the place of father for nearly two years." Benson began his academic career at Utah State Agricultural College (USAC, modern Utah State University), where he first met his future wife, Flora Smith Amussen. Benson alternated quarters at USAC and worked on the family farm.

Benson served an LDS Church mission in Britain from 1921 to 1923. It was while serving as a missionary, particularly an experience in Sheffield, that caused Benson to realize how central the Book of Mormon was to the message of Mormonism and in converting people to it. Due to local antagonism and threats of violence, LDS Church leaders sent apostle David O. McKay to personally oversee the mission. McKay was impressed with Benson and appointed him as president of the Newcastle Conference.

After his mission, Benson studied at Brigham Young University and finished his bachelor's degree there in 1926. That year he married Flora Smith Amussen, shortly after her return from a mission in Hawaii. They had six children together. Benson received a master of science degree in agricultural economics in 1927 from Iowa State University. Several years later, he did preliminary work on a doctorate at the University of California at Berkeley, but never completed it.

Just after receiving his master's degree, Benson returned to Whitney to run the family farm. He later became the county agriculture extension agent for Oneida County, Idaho. He later was promoted to the supervisor of all county agents and moved to Boise in 1930. Benson encouraged crop rotation, improved grains, fertilizers, pest controls, and establishment of farmer's cooperatives to market farm commodities.

While in Boise, Benson also worked in the central state extension office connected with the University of Idaho Extension Service. He also founded a farmers cooperative. Benson was superintendent of the Boise Stake Young Men's Mutual Improvement Association and later a counselor in the stake presidency. Benson was a critic of national agricultural policies implemented in the 1930s under Franklin D. Roosevelt. In particular, he objected to farm subsidies, and efforts by the Agricultural Adjustment Administration to raise prices by paying farmers to destroy crops and kill livestock.

In 1939, he became president of the Boise Idaho Stake. Later that year, he moved to Washington, D.C., to become Executive Secretary of the National Council of Farmer Cooperatives, overseeing around five thousand farm cooperatives which represented two million farmers throughout the country.

Benson became the first president of a new church stake in Washington, D.C. 
Benson, Ezra Taft (I317)
 
37 13th President of the United States.

He was the 13th president of the United States, serving from 1850 to 1853, the last to be a member of the Whig Party while in the White House. A former member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Upstate New York, Fillmore was elected as the 12th vice president in 1848, and succeeded to the presidency in July 1850 upon the death of U.S. President Zachary Taylor. Fillmore was instrumental in the passing of the Compromise of 1850, a bargain that led to a brief truce in the battle over the expansion of slavery. He failed to win the Whig nomination for president in 1852 but gained the endorsement of the nativist Know Nothing Party four years later and finished third in the 1856 presidential election.

Fillmore was born into poverty in the Finger Lakes area of New York State, and his parents were tenant farmers during his formative years. Though he had little formal schooling, he rose from poverty by diligent study to become a successful attorney. He became prominent in the Buffalo area as an attorney and politician, and he was elected to the New York Assembly in 1828 and to the House of Representatives in 1832. Initially, he belonged to the Anti-Masonic Party, but he became a member of the Whig Party as formed in the mid-1830s. He was a rival for the state party leadership with the editor Thurlow Weed and Weed's protégé, William H. Seward. Throughout his career, Fillmore declared slavery an evil but that it was beyond the powers of the federal government. Seward was openly hostile to slavery and argued that the federal government had a role to play in ending it. Fillmore was an unsuccessful candidate for Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives when the Whigs took control of the chamber in 1841, but he was made the chairman of the Ways and Means Committee. Defeated in bids for the Whig nomination for vice president in 1844 and for New York governor the same year, Fillmore was elected Comptroller of New York in 1847, the first to hold that post by direct election.

As vice president, Fillmore was largely ignored by Taylor, and even in the dispensing of patronage in New York, Taylor consulted Weed and Seward. In his capacity as president of the Senate, however, Fillmore presided over the Senate's angry debates, as the 31st Congress decided whether to allow slavery in the Mexican Cession. Fillmore, unlike Taylor, supported Henry Clay's Omnibus Bill, which was the basis of the 1850 Compromise. Upon becoming president in July 1850, Fillmore dismissed Taylor's cabinet and pushed Congress to pass the compromise. The Fugitive Slave Act, expediting the return of escaped slaves to those who claimed ownership, was a controversial part of the compromise. Fillmore felt duty-bound to enforce it despite its damage to the popularity of both him and the Whig Party, which was torn between its Northern and Southern factions. In foreign policy, Fillmore supported U.S. Navy expeditions to open trade in Japan, opposed French designs on Hawaii, and was embarrassed by Narciso López's filibuster expeditions to Cuba. Fillmore sought the Whig nomination to a full term in 1852 but was passed over by the Whigs in favor of Winfield Scott.

As the Whig Party broke up after Fillmore's presidency, many in his conservative wing joined the Know Nothings and formed the American Party. In his 1856 candidacy as the party's nominee, Fillmore had little to say about immigration, focused instead on the preservation of the Union, and won only Maryland. During the American Civil War, Fillmore denounced secession and agreed that the Union must be maintained by force if necessary, but he was critical of Abraham Lincoln's war policies. After peace was restored, he supported the Reconstruction policies of U.S. President Andrew Johnson. Fillmore remained involved in civic interests in retirement, including as chancellor of the University of Buffalo, which he had helped found in 1846. 
Fillmore, President Millard (I91540)
 
38 14th President of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

He was an American lawyer and the 14th president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) from 1994 to 1995. His nine-month presidential tenure is the shortest in the church's history. Hunter was the first president of the LDS Church born in the 20th century and the last to die in it. He was sustained as an LDS apostle at the age of 51, and served as a general authority for over 35 years.

Hunter was born to John William and Nellie Marie Hunter in Boise, Idaho. His father, who was not a Latter-day Saint but joined the church in 1927, would not allow Hunter to be baptized until he was 12; Hunter was ordained to the Aaronic priesthood several months after he turned 12. He was the second person to become an Eagle Scout in the state of Idaho.

In March 1923, the Boise Ward, where Hunter had been a member since his baptism, was split, and he ended up in the new Boise 2nd Ward. It initially met in a Jewish synagogue that was provided free of charge. When calls were issued to build the Boise LDS Tabernacle, Hunter was the first to pledge money for the building, offering $25.

Hunter had a love for music and played the piano, violin, drums, saxophone, clarinet, and trumpet. He formed a band called Hunter's Croonaders, which played at many regional events and on a cruise ship to Asia. 
Hunter, Howard William (I89367)
 
39 14th President of the United States.

He served as the 14th president of the United States from 1853 to 1857. He was a northern Democrat who believed that the abolitionist movement was a fundamental threat to the unity of the nation. He alienated anti-slavery groups by signing the Kansas–Nebraska Act and enforcing the Fugitive Slave Act, and conflict between North and South persisted until southern states seceded and the American Civil War began in 1861.

Pierce was born in New Hampshire. He served in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1833, before being elected to the Senate where he served from March 1837 until his resignation in 1842. His private law practice was a success, and he was appointed New Hampshire's U.S. Attorney in 1845. He took part in the Mexican–American War as a brigadier general in the Army. He was seen by Democrats as a compromise candidate uniting Northern and Southern interests and was nominated as the party's candidate for president on the 49th ballot at the 1852 Democratic National Convention. He and running mate William R. King easily defeated the Whig Party ticket of Winfield Scott and William A. Graham in the 1852 presidential election.

As president, Pierce simultaneously attempted to enforce neutral standards for civil service while also satisfying the diverse elements of the Democratic Party with patronage, an effort that largely failed and turned many in his party against him. He was a Young America expansionist who signed the Gadsden Purchase of land from Mexico and led a failed attempt to acquire Cuba from Spain. He signed trade treaties with Britain and Japan, while his Cabinet reformed their departments and improved accountability, but these successes were overshadowed by political strife during his presidency. His popularity declined sharply in the Northern states after he supported the Kansas–Nebraska Act, which nullified the Missouri Compromise, while many whites in the South continued to support him. Passage of the act led to violent conflict over the expansion of slavery in the American West. Pierce's administration was further damaged when several of his diplomats issued the Ostend Manifesto calling for the annexation of Cuba, a document that was roundly criticized. He fully expected to be renominated by the Democrats in the 1856 presidential election, but was abandoned by his party and his bid failed. His reputation in the North suffered further during the American Civil War as he became a vocal critic of President Abraham Lincoln.

Pierce was popular and outgoing, but his family life was difficult; his three children died young and his wife Jane suffered from illness and depression for much of her life. Their last surviving son was killed in a train accident while the family was traveling, shortly before Pierce's inauguration. A heavy drinker for much of his life, Pierce died in 1869 of cirrhosis of the liver. Historians and scholars generally rank Pierce as one of the worst and least memorable U.S. presidents. 
Pierce, President Franklin (I90951)
 
40 15th President of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

He was an American religious leader and author who served as the 15th President of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) from March 1995 until his death in January 2008 at age 97. Considered a prophet, seer, and revelator by church members, Hinckley was the oldest person to preside over the church in its history.

Hinckley's presidency was noted for the building of temples, with more than half of existing temples being built under his leadership. He also oversaw the reconstruction of the Nauvoo Illinois Temple and the building of the 21,000 seat Conference Center. During his tenure, "The Family: A Proclamation to the World" was issued and the Perpetual Education Fund was established. At the time of his death, approximately one-third of the church's membership had joined the church under Hinckley's leadership.

Hinckley was awarded ten honorary doctorate degrees, and in 2004 the Presidential Medal of Freedom by George W. Bush. He also received the Boy Scouts of America's highest award, the Silver Buffalo, and served as chairman of the Church Boards of Trustees/Education.[3] Hinckley died of natural causes on January 27, 2008. His wife, Marjorie Pay, died in 2004. He was succeeded as church president by Thomas S. Monson, who had served as his first counselor in the First Presidency, and, more importantly, was the President of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles; according to LDS doctrine and practice, Monson was Hinckley's anticipated successor. 
Hinckley, Gordon Bitner (I87266)
 
41 16th President of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

He was an American religious leader, author, and the 16th President of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church). As president, he was considered by adherents of the religion to be a prophet, seer, and revelator. Monson's early career was as a manager at the Deseret News, a Utah newspaper owned by the LDS Church. He spent most of his life engaged in various church leadership positions and public service.

Monson was ordained an LDS apostle at age 36, served in the First Presidency under three church presidents, and was the President of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles from March 12, 1995, until he became President of the Church on February 3, 2008. He succeeded Gordon B. Hinckley as church president.

Monson received four honorary doctorate degrees, as well as the Boy Scouts of America's Silver Buffalo and the World Organization of the Scout Movement's Bronze Wolf—the highest awards in each organization. He was a member of the National Executive Board of the Boy Scouts of America, the organization's governing body.

Monson was chairman of the Boards of Trustees/Education of the Church Educational System, and Ronald Reagan appointed him to the U.S. President's Task Force for Private Sector Initiatives. He married Frances Beverly Johnson in the Salt Lake Temple in 1948, and together they raised their three children. Frances died on May 17, 2013. 
Monson, Thomas Spencer (I89928)
 
42 16th President of the United States.

He was an American lawyer and statesman who served as the 16th president of the United States from 1861 until his assassination in 1865. Lincoln led the nation through the American Civil War and succeeded in preserving the Union, abolishing slavery, bolstering the federal government, and modernizing the U.S. economy.

Lincoln was born into poverty in a log cabin in Kentucky and was raised on the frontier primarily in Indiana. He was self-educated and became a lawyer, Whig Party leader, Illinois state legislator, and U.S. Congressman from Illinois. In 1849, he returned to his law practice but became vexed by the opening of additional lands to slavery as a result of the Kansas–Nebraska Act. He reentered politics in 1854, becoming a leader in the new Republican Party, and he reached a national audience in the 1858 debates against Stephen Douglas. Lincoln ran for President in 1860, sweeping the North in victory. Pro-slavery elements in the South equated his success with the North's rejection of their right to practice slavery, and southern states began seceding from the Union. To secure its independence, the new Confederate States fired on Fort Sumter, a U.S. fort in the South, and Lincoln called up forces to suppress the rebellion and restore the Union.

Lincoln, a moderate Republican, had to navigate a contentious array of factions with friends and opponents from both the Democratic and Republican parties. His allies, the War Democrats and the Radical Republicans, demanded harsh treatment of the Southern Confederates. Anti-war Democrats (called "Copperheads") despised Lincoln, and irreconcilable pro-Confederate elements plotted his assassination. He managed the factions by exploiting their mutual enmity, carefully distributing political patronage, and by appealing to the American people. His Gettysburg Address appealed to nationalistic, republican, egalitarian, libertarian, and democratic sentiments. Lincoln scrutinized the strategy and tactics in the war effort, including the selection of generals and the naval blockade of the South's trade. He suspended habeas corpus in Maryland, and he averted British intervention by defusing the Trent Affair. He engineered the end to slavery with his Emancipation Proclamation, including his order that the Army and Navy liberate, protect, and recruit former slaves. He also encouraged border states to outlaw slavery, and promoted the Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, which outlawed slavery across the country.

Lincoln managed his own successful re-election campaign. He sought to heal the war-torn nation through reconciliation. On April 14, 1865, just days after the war's end at Appomattox, he was attending a play at Ford's Theatre in Washington, D.C., with his wife Mary when he was fatally shot by Confederate sympathizer John Wilkes Booth. Lincoln is remembered as a martyr and hero of the United States and is often ranked as the greatest president in American history. 
Lincoln, President Abraham (I92743)
 
43 1787 census of Vejlby, Odense, Denmark GS#039,000

BIRTH: Vejlby Church Rec. GS#050,482

DEATH: Vejlby Church Rec. GS#050,484

MARRIAGE: Vejlby Church Rec. GS#050,483 
Madsdatter, Ane Marie (I2945)
 
44 1787 census of Vejlby, Odense, Denmark GS#039,000

BIRTH: Vejlby Church Rec. GS#050,482 
Madsdatter, Karen Margrethe (I2967)
 
45 1787 census of Vejlby, Odense, Denmark GS#039,000

BIRTH: Vejlby Church Rec. GS#050,482 
Madsdatter, Mette Cathrine (I2968)
 
46 1787 census of Vejlby, Odense, Denmark GS#039,000

BIRTH: Vejlby Church Rec. GS#050,482 
Madsdatter, Maren (I2969)
 
47 1787 census of Vejlby, Odense, Denmark GS#039,000

BIRTH: Vejlby Church Rec. GS#050,482 
Madsdatter, Birthe Margrethe (I2970)
 
48 1787 census of Vejlby, Odense, Denmark GS#039,000

BIRTH: Vejlby Church Rec. GS#050,482 
Madsen, Niels (I2971)
 
49 1787 Census of Vejlby, Odense, Denmark GS#039,000

Occupation: Small landholder

MARRIAGE: Kavslunde Church Rec. GS#050,249

DEATH: Vejlby Church Rec. GS#050,483 
Jorgensen, Mads (I2964)
 
50 1787 census of Vejlby, Odense, Denmark GS#039,000 Nielsdatter, Ane (I2965)
 

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