Our Family Genealogy Pages

Home Page  |  What's New  |  Photos  |  Histories  |  Headstones  |  Reports  |  Surnames
Search
First Name:


Last Name:



Carmen Benson

Carmen Benson

Female 1911 - 2001  (89 years)

Personal Information    |    Media    |    Notes    |    Event Map    |    All    |    PDF

  • Name Carmen Benson 
    Born 4 Nov 1911  Preston, Franklin, Idaho, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Christened 12 Nov 1911  Preston, Franklin, Idaho, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Female 
    AFN 5GW7-27 
    Census 1920  Preston, Franklin, Idaho, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Initiatory (LDS) 12 Dec 1958  LOGAN Find all individuals with events at this location 
    _FSFTID KWCP-9NK 
    _UID BC7532BCC4D8D41197D900400542377E4CE9 
    Died 17 Aug 2001  Preston, Franklin, Idaho, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried 20 Aug 2001  Preston Cemetery, Franklin, Idaho, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Lewis, Robert Moss and Benson, Carmen
    Lewis, Robert Moss and Benson, Carmen
    Person ID I95  mytree
    Last Modified 8 Feb 2015 

    Father Frank Taft Benson,   b. 23 Apr 1883, Logan, Cache, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 19 Feb 1923, Logan, Cache, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 39 years) 
    Mother Elizabeth Greaves "Lillie" Eames,   b. 6 Jun 1884, Logan, Cache, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 28 Dec 1966, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 82 years) 
    Married 27 Jan 1909  Logan, Cache, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Notes 
    • Marriage: Western States Marriage Index, 1809-2011, Utah, Select Marriages, 1887-1966
    Family ID F76  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Robert Moss Lewis, Jr,   b. 16 Mar 1909, Lewiston, Cache, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 6 Jul 1985  (Age 76 years) 
    Married 13 Sep 1936  Preston, Franklin, Idaho, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Ann Lewis,   b. 20 Dec 1937, Preston, Franklin, Idaho, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 7 Aug 2016, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 78 years)
     2. Colleen Lewis
     3. Robert Moss Lewis, III
     4. Harold Benson Lewis
     5. Carmen Lynne Lewis
     6. Elizabeth Lewis
    Last Modified 16 Jun 2018 
    Family ID F94  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 4 Nov 1911 - Preston, Franklin, Idaho, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChristened - 12 Nov 1911 - Preston, Franklin, Idaho, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsCensus - 1920 - Preston, Franklin, Idaho, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 13 Sep 1936 - Preston, Franklin, Idaho, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsInitiatory (LDS) - 12 Dec 1958 - LOGAN Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 17 Aug 2001 - Preston, Franklin, Idaho, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - 20 Aug 2001 - Preston Cemetery, Franklin, Idaho, United States Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Photos
    Benson, Carmen
    Carmen Benson
    Benson, Carmen and Harold
    Benson, Carmen and Harold
    Benson, Carmen - Eames, Lillie (Elizabeth) - Benson, Harold 1913
    Benson, Carmen - Eames, Lillie (Elizabeth) - Benson, Harold 1913
    Benson, Frank Taft - Eames, Elizabeth G 4 Oldest Children
    Benson, Frank Taft - Eames, Elizabeth G 4 Oldest Children
    Flora 1 year 9 months, Gladys 8, Carmen 6, Harold 6
    Benson, Frank Taft - Eames, Elizabeth G Children
    Benson, Frank Taft - Eames, Elizabeth G Children
    Zenda, Harold, Carmen, Nellie Lou, Gladys
    Benson, Harold - Gladys - Carmen
    Benson, Harold - Gladys - Carmen
    Carmen Benson - R Moss Lewis and Ann Lewis
    Carmen Benson - R Moss Lewis and Ann Lewis
    Sisters - Gladys Carmen Flora Zenda Nellie-Louisa Benson
    Sisters - Gladys Carmen Flora Zenda Nellie-Louisa Benson
    Nellie Lou, Carmen, and Flora Benson with mother Elizabeth Eames - Mar 1959
    Nellie Lou, Carmen, and Flora Benson with mother Elizabeth Eames - Mar 1959
    Benson, Carmen b1911 - Portrait
    Benson, Carmen b1911 - Portrait
    Back-Zenda, Flora, Carmen, Nellie Louisa Benson Front-Gladys Benson, Kaye Nelson, Elizabeth G Eames
    Back-Zenda, Flora, Carmen, Nellie Louisa Benson Front-Gladys Benson, Kaye Nelson, Elizabeth G Eames

    Documents
    Benson, Carmen b1911 - Obituary
    Benson, Carmen b1911 - Obituary

  • Notes 
    • RIVERDALE, Idaho Carmen Benson Lewis our beloved mother and grandmother, passed away peacefully Friday, Aug. 17, 2001, as a result of her age. She was born in Preston, Idaho on Nov. 4, 1911, to Frank Taft and Elizabeth Greaves Eames Benson. She is preceded in death by her husband, three of her sisters, an infant brother, and her twin brother. Her last living sister, Zenda Mabey, resides in Salt Lake City.

      Carmen married Robert Moss Lewis on Sept. 13, 1936. Their marriage was later solemnized in the Logan, Utah Temple. They have six children, Ann (Carvel, deceased) Stephenson, N. Hollywood,Calif., Colleen (Warren) Wilde, Preston, Idaho, Robert M. (Renae) Lewis, Arvada, Colo., H. Benson (Julie) Lewis, Sandy, Utah, Lynne (Steve) Cherrington, Orem, Utah, Beth (Bud) Alford, Idaho Falls, Idaho; 30 grandchildren, 34 great-grandchildren, and three great-great-grandchildren.Carmen lived her life in Cache Valley except for two years while she attended Brigham Young University. She and Moss lived their entire married lives on their farm in Riverdale. Carmens great love and focus in life was her family. Her greatest satisfaction was in seeing them succeed. We will miss her wit, grit, and her special love for each of us.

      She was an active member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, where, among other things, she taught primary for 25 years and young women for many years. The family wishes to express appreciation to the caregivers at the Franklin County Nursing Home for their kindness and diligence in providing for her care.

      Funeral services will be held at 1 p.m. on Monday, Aug. 20, 2001 in the Riverdale Ward Chapel with Bishop Sam Smith conducting. Friends may call from 6 to 8 p.m., Sunday, at Webb Funeral Home, 109 E. Oneida, Preston, and from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Monday at the church. Burial will be in the Preston Cemetery.



      Mom was generally happy and almost always singing or humming. Like most mothers that I have known, my mom really loved her kids, but I haven’t met very many women who liked their children as much as she liked us.

      Mother and I were inseparable when I was a small child. I remember Mother and Father going on a date one time when I was a little boy. Grandmother stayed with us that evening. During the first 6 years of my life that was the only time I was ever separated from my mother.

      From a very early age, Mother and Father gave me chores to do. They always acted like my help was critical to them. I remember feeling from my earliest years that I played an important, productive role in the family. I couldn’t imagine how Dad could get the chores all done without me. Also, I couldn’t imagine how Mother could bear being separated from me.

      As with any child, I made many mistakes and did many foolish things. But, I can never remember my father getting angry with me. Similarly, I seldom seemed to make my mother mad.

      With this background, it is easy for me to understand now why adjusting to school was so difficult for me. First of all, I had never been to church or anywhere else without my parents. Secondly, I couldn’t imagine how my family, particularly my Mother and Father, could carry on without me being with them. I did fine in school during class, but during recess on sunny days I would crawl through the shrub dividing the school playground from the post office lawn and lay there next to the shrub crying. On rainy days, I would drop down into a window well and cry during recess. I was crying because I was homesick. But, mostly, I was crying because I was imagining how hard it was for Dad to get his chores done without me. I also imagined how Mother must’ve sat at home alone wringing her hands and sobbing because she missed me so badly. I learned later that they were both just fine having me gone, but at the age of 6, I couldn’t imagine them enduring the day without me.

      It seemed to me that Mother always thought that I was smart, funny, and a delight to be around. When the school bus brought us home from school in the afternoon, Mother always drove to the end of the lane to pick us up. I learned later from my older sisters that mother had a rule that no one spoke until I got to tell her how my day had been. Then, others were welcome to add their dreary, less interesting accounts of their days.

      As I grew older, Mother used to go to all of my ballgames. She particularly loved the summer fast pitch softball games of my youth. Benson was the catcher on our team and I played 3rd base. I was a lousy hitter, but an excellent fielder. Mother used to comment that I ran “beautifully” after one of my many hitless performances. (Those of you who have seen me run know how amusing that statement is.) Predictably, Mom was our loudest, most dependable fan. Her dependability won her a place on our bench as the scorekeeper. During many particularly exciting games she would often yell and bounce up and down on the team bench.

      As a teenager, when I returned home at night after a school event or after a date, I always sat in the big chair by mom and dad’s bed and talked to mom about my evening. I didn’t do it because I felt I needed to be accountable to her. I just felt certain that she would want to know, and would enjoy my account of the evening. Thinking back on it now, I’m sure most of the time she would have appreciated not being awakened; however, she never said that. I just always thought that she found me so interesting that she probably couldn’t wait for me to come home and tell her about my night.

      When I went off to college, I lived at Aunt Gladys’s house in Salt Lake City during my freshman year. I had my own room and my own bathroom, luxuries I had never known before. However, every weekend, I would find a way to get from Salt Lake to Preston (usually by a 4 hour bus ride) to be with my family. When I came home, I had to share a bed with my brother and a bathroom without a door with my entire family, and I had to milk cows every morning and night and clean corrals during the day. But, I couldn’t wait to get home because I loved it so much there, and because I knew that my family loved and liked me so much.

      I have thought often of the gifts that my parents gave me. I left home with far less money than the vast majority of my classmates at the University of Utah. I also had just a country high school education, lacking much of what had been learned by my classmates in their larger, better equipped schools. However, my parents had given me many gifts that have proved to be treasures to me throughout my life. One important gift was the ability to work. But perhaps the most important gift that my parents, especially my mother, gave me was the gift of feeling that I was an important, likable person. This gift has changed everything for me. They sent me from their home into the world with great confidence, believing that I had tremendous value and assuming that people would always like me. It has given me my confidence, my optimism, and my affection for other people.

      While my parents certainly weren’t perfect people, they created a home environment where a little boy with limited natural ability and gifts was made to feel capable, needed, and best of all, likable and lovable. Their gift to me was a happy life. A parent can give no greater gift to a child.