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Elizabeth Greaves "Lillie" Eames

Elizabeth Greaves "Lillie" Eames

Female 1884 - 1966  (82 years)

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  • Name Elizabeth Greaves Eames 
    Nickname Lillie 
    Born 6 Jun 1884  Logan, Cache, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Female 
    Census 1910  Preston, Franklin, Idaho, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Census 1920  Preston, Franklin, Idaho, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Died 28 Dec 1966  Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried 31 Dec 1966  Logan City Cemetery, Cache, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Headstones Submit Headstone Photo Submit Headstone Photo 
    Person ID I94  mytree
    Last Modified 18 Jul 2015 

    Father David Cullen Eames,   b. 1 Sep 1851, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 9 Feb 1929, Preston, Franklin, Idaho, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 77 years) 
    Mother Elizabeth Cluley Greaves,   b. 21 Oct 1856, Provo, Utah, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 5 May 1942, Preston, Franklin, Idaho, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 85 years) 
    Married 4 Jun 1884  Logan, Cache, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F88  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Frank Taft Benson,   b. 23 Apr 1883, Logan, Cache, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 19 Feb 1923, Logan, Cache, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 39 years) 
    Married 27 Jan 1909  Logan, Cache, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Notes 
    • !Marriage: Western States Marriage Index, 1809-2011, Utah, Select Marriages, 1887-1966
    Children 
    +1. Gladys Benson,   b. 12 Nov 1909, Preston, Franklin, Idaho, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 Jan 1995, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 85 years)
    +2. Carmen Benson,   b. 4 Nov 1911, Preston, Franklin, Idaho, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 17 Aug 2001, Preston, Franklin, Idaho, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 89 years)
    +3. Harold Eames Benson,   b. 11 Apr 1911, Preston, Franklin, Idaho, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Jul 1948, Park City, Summit, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 37 years)
    +4. Flora Benson,   b. 30 Jan 1916, Whitney, Franklin, Idaho, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 14 Oct 1984, West Jordan, Salt Lake, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 68 years)
    +5. Zenda Benson,   b. 25 Oct 1918, Preston, Franklin, Idaho, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 Feb 2003, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 84 years)
     6. Frank Eames Benson,   b. 26 Sep 1920, Whitney, Franklin, Idaho, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 2 Jan 1923, Logan, Cache, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 2 years)
    +7. Nellie Louisa Benson,   b. 11 Sep 1923, Whitney, Franklin, Idaho, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 11 Oct 1975, Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 52 years)
    Last Modified 1 Jan 2018 
    Family ID F71  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 6 Jun 1884 - Logan, Cache, Utah, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 27 Jan 1909 - Logan, Cache, Utah, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsCensus - 1910 - Preston, Franklin, Idaho, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsCensus - 1920 - Preston, Franklin, Idaho, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 28 Dec 1966 - Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - 31 Dec 1966 - Logan City Cemetery, Cache, Utah, United States Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Photos
    Eames, Elizabeth G
    Elizabeth Eames
    Eames, David Cullen Family
    Eames, David Cullen Family
    t Nathaniel - Sarah - David - Rebecca - Aerial b Ilah - David Cullen - Joseph - Elizabeth (Lillie) - Elizabeth Greaves
    Benson, Carmen - Eames, Lillie (Elizabeth) - Benson, Harold 1913
    Benson, Carmen - Eames, Lillie (Elizabeth) - Benson, Harold 1913
    Eames Women
    Eames Women
    Elizabeth Cluley Greaves - Sarah - Rebecca - Elizabeth (Lillie) - Ilah (bottom)
    Greaves, Elizabeth Cluley - Eames, Elizabeth (Lillie) Mother & Daughter
    Greaves, Elizabeth Cluley - Eames, Elizabeth (Lillie) Mother & Daughter
    At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.
    Benson, Frank Taft - Eames, Elizabeth (Lillie)
    Benson, Frank Taft - Eames, Elizabeth (Lillie)
    Sister of Kember, Kember Mabey, Zenda Benson, Elizabeth G Eames
    Sister of Kember, Kember Mabey, Zenda Benson, Elizabeth G Eames
    Eames, Elizabeth G b1884 with Gr Kids, Kaye - Frankie - Lorraine Nelson
    Eames, Elizabeth G b1884 with Gr Kids, Kaye - Frankie - Lorraine Nelson
    4 Generations
Frankie Nelson - Gladys Benson - Elizabeth Eames - Elizabeth Greaves
    4 Generations Frankie Nelson - Gladys Benson - Elizabeth Eames - Elizabeth Greaves
    Nellie Lou, Carmen, and Flora Benson with mother Elizabeth Eames - Mar 1959
    Nellie Lou, Carmen, and Flora Benson with mother Elizabeth Eames - Mar 1959
    Back -Aerial G - David G - Joseph L Eames - Arthur Tippets Front -Sara G - Iiah - Elizabeth G - Rebecca M Eames
    Back -Aerial G - David G - Joseph L Eames - Arthur Tippets Front -Sara G - Iiah - Elizabeth G - Rebecca M Eames
    Back-Zenda, Flora, Carmen, Nellie Louisa Benson Front-Gladys Benson, Kaye Nelson, Elizabeth G Eames
    Back-Zenda, Flora, Carmen, Nellie Louisa Benson Front-Gladys Benson, Kaye Nelson, Elizabeth G Eames
    Eames, Elizabeth G b1884 - Portrait
    Eames, Elizabeth G b1884 - Portrait
    Sara G - Iiah - Elizabeth G - Rebecca M Eames
    Sara G - Iiah - Elizabeth G - Rebecca M Eames

    Headstones
    Eames, Elizabeth G b1884
    Eames, Elizabeth G b1884

    Histories
    Elizabeth Greaves Eames - written from the perspective of Robert Moss Lewis III, December 30, 2012
    Elizabeth Greaves Eames - written from the perspective of Robert Moss Lewis III, December 30, 2012
    I Remember Lillie
    I Remember Lillie
    Frank Benson Letter to Lillie Eames during mission 1
    Frank Benson Letter to Lillie Eames during mission 1
    Frank Benson Letter to Lillie Eames during mission 2
    Frank Benson Letter to Lillie Eames during mission 2
    Frank Benson Letter to Lillie Eames during mission 3
    Frank Benson Letter to Lillie Eames during mission 3
    Frank Benson Letter to Lillie Eames during mission 4
    Frank Benson Letter to Lillie Eames during mission 4
    Frank Benson Letter to Lillie Eames during mission 5
    Frank Benson Letter to Lillie Eames during mission 5
    Frank Benson Letter to Lillie Eames during mission 6
    Frank Benson Letter to Lillie Eames during mission 6

  • Notes 
    • !Death: Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014

      Frankie Nelson Whipple's Memories:

      ELIZABETH EAMES BENSON (Lillie)

      No one ever had a better Grandmother than mine was. She was a hug you, talk to you, give you a cookie grandmother. She kept a drawer full of odds and ends of jewelry and other treasures to be played with and she always had a new set of kittens to be cuddled. She made each one of her grandchildren think that they were her favorite.
      Grandmother was born Elizabeth Eames in Preston, Idaho in 1895. She was born to farm people and spent all of her growing up years on a farm. She married a farmer and expected to live all of her life as a farmer's wife. But the world was not kind to grandmother and she lost first a son, then her husband to illnesses. After grandpa died, she moved with her family into a drafty old house in the small town of Preston. There she raised her five daughters and one remaining son.
      Grandmother was a religious person. When we visited we were called to prayers on our knees before every meal, at bedtime, and in the morning. She spoke of Jesus as if He were with us every moment. He seemed to be her personal friend. We really enjoyed going to church with her, because she sang the hymns with such enthusiasm that we could hardly keep from laughing. Then after meetings she would tease us into retelling what we had heard, always with ice cream waiting as a reward for having listened.
      Grandmother liked having her family around her. It was a great occasion when we all got together for Thanksgiving or Christmas. My cousins and I would explore closets and corners of the house, play on her old pump organ on the stair landing, or make nuisances of ourselves in the kitchen while she prepared meals. We were allowed to eat before the grown-ups so we would stay out of their way during dinner and after-dinner conversation. But we didn't mind. We could hide on the stairs and listen to everything that was said in the kitchen. I'm sure grandmother knew we were there, but she never shooed us away.
      I never had a birthday go by without a gift from grand-
      mother. Even when I was grown she went me little books with a dollar tucked inside. I remember when she was very old her book of birthdays disappeared. I'm sure one of her daughters took it to keep her from spending what little money she had on gifts for all of her large family, but she worried about it and fussed for months. It seemed to me a mean thing to have done to her. But I was not consulted.
      My grandmother died at the age of 83. She had become so old that she scarcely recognized her family. But even then she talked to me and asked how I was doing. She laughed and sang and seemed like a fairy-godmother. I cried at her funeral, and cry still when I think how much I miss her.


      Grandma's Kitchen

      "She could make a third of a pound of hamburger go further than anyone I know."

      No family member ever went into Grandma's home without eating. Her kitchen was large, a friendly place, with fresh oilcloth on the round oak table and home-canned fruits, jams, bread, vegetables bottled from the summer harvest, and love sprinkled liberally around. She bustled when someone came in. Cupboards would be opened, dishes set about, bottles fetched from the pantry.

      "'You mustn't get fleshy,' she said, but she fed us whenever we came into the house."

      The kitchen was the center of everything good about coming to Grandma's. Even before she had the modern conveniences of an electric range and refrigerator, the coal burning stove spread its warmth into arms and legs chilled by the long trek from icy upstairs bedrooms. She was first up in the mornings and lighted a fire in its black belly, then set water to boil for porridge. We often pulled a chair up close to the stove and toasted our fingers near its sides. By the time we were warmed enough to wash and dress the table would be set.

      "And she used to make a pudding that was called Blue Mange Pudding. That was the best stuff in the world. And she made a little sauce that was...wonderful."

      We could not just eat in the mornings; prayer was an integral part of every meal. Morning prayers were especially important as they prepared us for the coming day. We would kneel on the hard, cold floor, for the stove seldom warmed anything below our knees, and bow our heads reverently over the seats of the kitchen chairs, enduring a long, devout supplication. Grandma was profuse in her gratitude to the Lord for her blessings, and she pleaded with Him earnestly that we might all be called to repentence. Mostly we children prayed for prayers to end that we might get bare knees off the chilly linoleum.
      Grandma kept one drawer in the china cabinet that we girls loved to explore. It held old lipsticks, pieces of ribbon, an assortment of earings, most without partners, pencils, and other tiny treasures begging to be played with. If the kitchen was not being used we could pull the drawer out onto the floor and explore its contents, but mostly we had to stand at the cabinet and take things out one at a time. When the family was gathered for a holiday, we were rudely shooed out of the kitchen and had to leave the drawer behind.

      "I remember Thanksgiving with all the family gathered around the table."

      Grandma's kitchen became everything good in the world at Thanksgiving. It was crowded with aunts, all stirring, opening, basting, and scolding children for getting underfoot. Wonderful smells beckoned us even as we were fussed at to leave. We would hang about in the doorways savoring the odors of roast turkey, hot parkerhouse rolls, saged-dressing, and pumpkin pie. If we could sneak in at the right moment we might snitch a bit of dressing or a finger of jelly, but we were soon discovered and scooted out. When one of the men wandered in, he was just as rudely dismissed. Sometimes we would give up and crawl on an uncle's lap, listening to man-talk while the women laughed and chattered in the kitchen.

      "It seemed like we got everyone there, around the table, all the aunts and uncles and cousins."

      Every corner of the house seemed to be full of children at these times. Those of us who were older tried to find a moment of privacy for girl-secrets, while the little ones followed us and cried when we shoved them away. We would often end on the stair landing, playing the old pump organ that rested there. We managed to make delicious noise until someone yelled at us in exasperation to stop.

      "She'd get new oilcoth to put on the table and it was a special occasion."

      Finally the table would be ready. The children were allowed to eat first, self-preservation for the adults. We gathered at the table and sampled each of the dishes so carefully prepared for us, while trying to keep track of all the news going on around us. Aunts and conversations moved into the living room leaving just Grandma to fuss over us. Somehow eating the meal was not as much fun as snitching bits before it was done. But we did our best to eat to popping stage, then we were bustled out of the kitchen to allow the grown-ups to have their meal. We seldom left them in peace; their laughter was like a magnet, and there was always room for one more piece of turkey from Mama's plate. True joy was the year that we girls were considered old enough to join the grown-ups. We finally became privy to all the gossip that a scattered family brings to such a gathering.

      "It was a special occasion whenever she got anything new. She never had much, but she'd save."

      On early visits I watched Grandma lifting first one and then the other heavy flat iron from the stove where it had been heating to iron her white blouse. It seemed quaint and clever to press clothing without using electricity. Like watching the coal flame and burn as she fed the stove on cold mornings, I felt a kind of magic about the heavy flat irons. I doubt that Grandma appreciated the magic. I remember the celebration when the coal stove was replaced with gleaming white electric range. The family oooh'ed and aah'd, but I was wistful. There was an intimacy in the shivering anticipation as I watched Grandma start the morning fire.