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James Duncan

James Duncan

Male 1828 - 1912  (83 years)  Submit Photo / DocumentSubmit Photo / Document

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  • Name James Duncan 
    Born 5 Feb 1828  Greenend, Lanarkshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Christened 4 Apr 1828  Old Monkland, Lanarkshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Census 1900  Meadow, Millard, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    FamilySearch ID KWJ4-PQW 
    Died 11 Jan 1912  Meadow, Millard, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried 13 Jan 1912  Meadow, Millard, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Headstones Submit Headstone Photo Submit Headstone Photo 
    Person ID I6456  mytree
    Last Modified 11 Jun 2018 

    Father James Duncan,   b. 25 Oct 1807, Larbert, Stirlingshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1851, Grove Diggings, St. Louis, Missouri, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 43 years) 
    Mother Mary McLauchlin,   b. 20 Jan 1809, Lanarkshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1850, Elizabethtown, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 40 years) 
    Married 29 Jun 1827  Cambuslang, Lanarkshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F4228  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Jennette Snedden,   b. 24 Apr 1830, Gartsherrie, Lanarkshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 28 Jul 1914, Meadow, Millard, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 84 years) 
    Married 1850  Pennsylvania, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
    +1. Mary Jennett Duncan,   b. 15 Apr 1854, Fillmore, Millard, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 16 Dec 1942, Meadow, Millard, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 88 years)
    +2. James Duncan, Jr,   b. 26 Feb 1857, Fillmore, Millard, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 11 Jul 1905, Clear Lake, Millard, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 48 years)
    +3. David William Duncan,   b. 4 Feb 1859, Meadow, Millard, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1 Aug 1906, Meadow, Millard, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 47 years)
    +4. John Wallace Duncan,   b. 7 Jan 1861, Meadow, Millard, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 5 Jan 1949, La Verkin, Washington, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 87 years)
    +5. Christina Duncan,   b. 24 Mar 1863, Meadow, Millard, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 4 Nov 1886, Holbrook, Navajo, Arizona, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 23 years)
    +6. Elizabeth Emma Duncan,   b. 8 Feb 1866, Meadow, Millard, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 10 Apr 1950, Meadow, Millard, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 84 years)
     7. Adam Duncan,   b. 3 Feb 1868, Meadow, Millard, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Mar 1868, Meadow, Millard, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 0 years)
    +8. Richard Duncan,   b. 8 Jan 1869, Meadow, Millard, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 Oct 1931, Provo, Utah, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 62 years)
     9. George Duncan,   b. 27 Aug 1871, Meadow, Millard, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 28 Aug 1871, Meadow, Millard, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 0 years)
    Last Modified 31 Mar 2020 
    Family ID F3355  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 5 Feb 1828 - Greenend, Lanarkshire, Scotland Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChristened - 4 Apr 1828 - Old Monkland, Lanarkshire, Scotland Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 1850 - Pennsylvania, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsCensus - 1900 - Meadow, Millard, Utah, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 11 Jan 1912 - Meadow, Millard, Utah, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - 13 Jan 1912 - Meadow, Millard, Utah, United States Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Photos
    Duncan, James
    James Duncan

    Headstones
    Duncan, James b1828 - Snedden, Jennette b1830 - Duncan, Adam b1868 - Duncan, George b1871
    Duncan, James b1828 - Snedden, Jennette b1830 - Duncan, Adam b1868 - Duncan, George b1871

  • Notes 
    • Pioneer

      Unknown Companies (1847-1868)Age at departure: 25
      James and his wife Janet came to Utah in either 1851 or 1852. Further research is needed to narrow the year of their travel.

      JAMES DUNCAN James Duncan, son of James Duncan and Mary McLaughlin, was born in Green End, Scotland, February 5, 1828. While a young man in Scotland he heard the Mormon Missionaries preach, and was converted to the Mormon Church. He decided to come to America and join the Saints. When he was twenty-two years old he sailed for America. On the dame ship was a Scottish girl by the name of Janette Sneddon, just two years younger than James. When they got to Pennsylvania they both stopped to earn money to continue to Utah. Janette worked for a Mrs. Walker who was very kind to her and taught her many things about housekeeping. Mrs. Walker was also very hospitable to James when he came to court Janette. She told Janette to give him food and treat him well. Janette was still with Mrs. Walker when she and James were married in 1851. They crossed the plains and settled in Sessions, (Bountiful) where they both worked for Anson Call. When Anson called by Brigham Young to settle Fillmore, Anson took James and Janette with him to Fillmore. They first settled in Fillmore where their first two children were born, Mary Janette, born April 15, 1854, and James, born February 26, 1857. James was pasturing a herd of cows on the tall grass about seven miles south of Fillmore. The soil was not rocky as it was in Fillmore, and there was a small mountain stream. He went home and talked it over with his wife, and she consented to move to the south. They lived in a cave on the side of a hill, and after four months several other families joined them. Here David was born February 4, 1859. About a year and a half later James Duncan supervised the moving of the town of Meadow farther east as the water could then be taken from the creek. James was superintendent of the Sunday School, Bishop’s counselor to Bishop Hyrum Bell Bennett, and worked in other positions in the church. More children came to bless their home: John born January 7, 1861; Christina born March 24, 1863; Elizabeth Emma born February 8, 1866; Adam born February 3, 1868; Richard born, February 8, 1869; George born August 27, 1871. James was a professional adobe maker and soon made adobes and built the first house in Meadow, he also made adobes for the other houses and some of those houses still stand. He was very industrious, strictly honest and fair in all his dealings, a fine example for all of the citizens, he passed away, January 4, 1911, at the age of 83 and is buried beside his wife in the Meadow Cemetery. James Duncan was one of the first of four men called to colonize Meadow. The early years there were difficult but not without humor. These early settlers had accumulated some cattle and a few sheep, chickens and pigs that roamed freely throughout their fields. Because of the tremendous amount of work that went into providing food and shelter for the families, corrals and pens had to wait. Companies of settlers on their way to California found it handy to just help themselves to the animals they wanted, but the settlers found this increasingly hard to cope with. One late afternoon when two or three of these company men stopped at grandfather’s place, they saw a nice fat bull and decided to take it along with them. Grandmother protested but they paid no attention to her. Soon after they left, grandfather came home from the field where he had been working and found grandmother in tears and very upset. He decided that was enough--he was not going to allow people to take his animals any longer without at least putting up a fight. He was going to get that bull back. Though he didn’t have a gun, he did have a good bullwhip, called a “quirt or Black Snake”, hanging on the wall and he knew how to throw and pop it with authority. Grandmother was afraid of him and tried to talk him out of going after them, but grandfather, a stubborn Scotsman, took down the bullwhip and set out at a fast pace. Overtaking the men, he announced that he had come for the bull and when they started to object, put on a little exhibition—popping and swinging the whip with impressive skill. “Do I get the bull or do you feel the sting of my whip?” he demanded. Just what happened after that grandfather never did say, but he returned with the bull. It has been said that there were some who could pick a fly off a horse with those whips and never touch the horse—these men may have thought he was one of this group. During the time that grandfather and grandmother James Duncan were living in the old fort at Fillmore, Indians often camped where Meadow is now. Chief Walker, their leader, was known to be a very cruel Indian and most of the whites were afraid of him. At that time the area was a vast meadow of tall grass so the pioneers ran their cattle there in the summer and cut the grass for winter-feed. The men would return to Fillmore every night, however, as they were afraid the Indians might make trouble. One day the cattle thundered into the fort, many shot with Indian arrows. Grandfather, volunteered to go see what had caused the trouble. At that time. Chief Walker’s band was camped on the northeast corner of the town where the creek ran from the mountains through he meadows, so grandfather started out on foot along the foothills where the cedars grew thick. He met a Mr. King who was looking for his cattle and the two proceeded to the Indian camp. There they found the Indians dancing around in circles, moaning and performing the death rituals. Chief Walker was dead. One Indian left the dance, ran a few steps and shot a pony, and then another did the same, and another. These animals were for Chief Walker to fide [take] into the happy hunting grounds. Later when the dancing stopped, they tied the Chief to a horse, formed a line and wound their way up the canyon. There they prepared a grave and furnished it with supplies, dishes, weapons and all the materials necessary for Chief Walker to live happily in the hereafter. Grandfather was appalled when they also buried alive with him one of his own papooses. He worked his head up through the pickets that were placed over the grave and cried pitifully. The Indians gave strict orders to everyone not to go into the canyon—their Chief’s happy hunting grounds. The pioneers were not even allowed to make a road into the canyon. This experience took place between 1854 and 1857. Biography obtained from the Daughters of the Utah Pioneers, Fillmore, Utah, Territorial Statehouse Museum.