Our Family Genealogy Pages

Home Page  |  What's New  |  Photos  |  Histories  |  Headstones  |  Reports  |  Surnames
Search
First Name:


Last Name:



Notes


Matches 1 to 50 of 1,918

      1 2 3 4 5 ... 39» Next»

 #   Notes   Linked to 
1

BIRTH: Also shown as Born 1840 
Elliston, Thomas John (I113863)
 
2

BIRTH: Also shown as Born Bedfont, Middlesex, England. 
Page, Elizabeth (I96028)
 
3

BIRTH: Also shown as Born Strenshem, Worcestershire, England. 
Russell, William (I14107)
 
4

DEATH: Also shown as Died 1628 
Jansen, Jan (I2562)
 
5

GIVEN NAMES: Also shown as Fredrick 
Taft, Frederick (I42901)
 
6

GIVEN NAMES: Also shown as Llywelyn 
ap Iorwerth, Llwellyn "The Great" (I40285)
 
7

SURNAME: Also shown as Mestrizat 
Mestrezat, Leger (I40498)
 
8

SURNAME: Also shown as Tompkins 
Thompkins, Priscilla (I3521)
 
9

SURNAME: Also shown as Tuttle 
Hollister, Elizabeth (I87981)
 
10

~BAPTISM: Also shown as Baptized 19 Jun 2015, GILBE.

~ENDOWMENT: Also shown as Endowed In Progress 
Clarke, Mabel (I74674)
 
11

~BAPTISM: Also shown as Baptized 30 Sep 2015, OQUIR.

~ENDOWMENT: Also shown as Endowed 24 Sep 2016, SANTI.

~SEALING_PARENTS: Also shown as SealPar Submitted 
Spencer, Adelaide Margaret Delia (I116623)
 
12

~BAPTISM: Also shown as Baptized 7 Oct 1961

~ENDOWMENT: Also shown as Endowed 10 Feb 1933 
Brooke, John (I90657)
 
13

~BAPTISM: Also shown as Baptized Completed

~ENDOWMENT: Also shown as Endowed Completed

~SEALING_PARENTS: Also shown as SealPar 2 Jun 2015, SLAKE. 
Freeman, John (I87127)
 
14

~ENDOWMENT: Also shown as Endowed 19 Apr 2013, DENVE. 
Hull, Cornelius (I97626)
 
15

~SEALING_PARENTS: Also shown as SealPar 28 Jul 2010, NZEAL. 
Blanchard, Richard Alfred Pridham (I114023)
 
16
William Clayton Partridge was born October 2, 1862 at Farmington Davis County, Utah, to Edward Partridge Jr. and Sarah Lucretia Clayton. He was the third child born in a family of eight children. He was, as I have heard say, just a rough and ready Mormon boy. He was called to fill a mission to the Hawaiian Islands when he was still in his teens. His father before him had served as the President of this mission. His testimony of the gospel was indeed strengthened and grew during these years. He used to tell of these wonderful experiences, and vivid answers to his fervent prayers. I remember he and his wife, Sarah Jane Stott, kept a coconut on the floor by the front door of their home in Cowley, Wyoming, a keepsake from his missionary years in Hawaii.
He answered a call to colonize the Big Horn basin in Wyoming in the year 1900. Taking his wife, Sarah Jane Stott, and his three children, he settled in Cowley and became it’s first bishop. Later he became the President of the stake and in later life was very active in genealogical work.
He passed away May 3 1938 at the age of 76. William was a very industrious man and desired to be in debt to no man. At his death he had no debts. He felt that it was dearer to borrow by far than to buy. He said at one time that it wasn’t where we were buried that counted but how we lived. Also that it wasn’t so much how proud we were of our ancestors but how proud they would be of us; that each of us owed it to the family name to make it a good name. He worked very hard and made a good living and home for his family and was revered by all who knew him.
Note: The above account was written by my mother, Geniel Lillie Jacobson Partridge. Grandpa passed away before I was born. I remember mother often telling me stories of Grandpa W. C. Partridge and how very kind he was to her as a daughter-in-law. I heard that he had a great sense of humor and dry wit. She loved and respected him highly.  
Partridge, William Clayton (I19786)
 
17 ARABELLA ANN CHANDLER was born February 27, 1824, in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, England, the fourth child of George Chandler and Esther Glover. The family group sheets give her name as Arabella, though in her history her children George and Caroline call her “Arabell Ann,” so maybe that’s how she pronounced her name. Arabella’s parents had thirteen children, of which seven died in childhood. George and Caroline describe their grandparents this way:
“George Chandler was an unusual character, being high-minded, strict in his habits, exacting in his discipline, and immaculate in his dress and personal appearance. Everything about him, both in private and in public, must conform to his social ambition. He would not recognize his own children until they were up to his standard in personal appearance.
“. . . Esther Glover, was of modest disposition, highly refined, naturally artistic, scrupulously clean, and possessed of unusual executive ability. Arabell Ann inherited these characteristics from her parents.”
The Chandlers went to church and read the Bible in the home. Arabella’s family was prosperous. She went to school, studied literature, and spent a lot of time horse back riding. But then her father suffered a financial reversal. Much of their property was tied up in litigation and was never recovered. Arabella learned dress-making and millinery (women’s hat making) to help support the family. George died in 1839, when Arabella was about 15. Before long, Arabella was supporting her mother and brother Frederick, who was only 5 when their father died.
In 1842, Esther, Arabella, and Frederick were baptized into The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints. Arabella was 18 at the time. Arabella did missionary work by distributing tracts door-to-door in Cheltenham. In 1849, when Arabella was 25, her mother died. Arabella’s sister Clarissa and her husband John Alder, a member of the Church since 1842, emigrated to St. Louis in 1850.1 Arabella saved her money and earned enough for her and Frederick to follow them in 1851. They sailed with a company of Saints on the George W. Bourne to New Orleans and then by riverboat to St. Louis. Arabella worked at dressmaking and millinery to try to earn enough money to continue on to Zion. She met a recent convert, Samuel Rose Parkinson, also English, and married him on January 1, 1852. She was 27 at the time, and he just 20.
Samuel was doing well as a drayman (someone who hauls things for a living), owned his teams, and had money in the bank. Their first child, Samuel Chandler, was born February 23, 1853. The Parkinsons left their home and business in 1854 to come to Utah, bringing Frederick as well as Samuel’s little sister Lucy with them. Arabella had to cook over buffalo chips, and once they saw a buffalo stampede. They encountered Indians, including a party of 350 fresh from raiding, whom the pioneers fed and gave gifts. The Parkinsons and their company narrowly escaped a massacre at Fort Laramie.
Arabella and Samuel moved first to Kaysville. Samuel built her a log house with a dirt roof and a dirt floor. On August 1, 1855, she had a girl, Charlotte, and the next day, August 2, Charlotte’s twin brother, William. Arabella was in bed with them when a storm blew a part of the roof off the house, drenching mother and babies with rain and mud, but they pulled through. Samuel gardened, raised stock, ran a threshing machine, and worked on the fort. Arabella kept house and sewed for her family and for hire. Their son George was born July 18, 1857. Samuel was called up in the Utah War and spent much of that winter on guard duty in the cliffs in Echo Canyon. On July 7, 1859, they had another son, Franklin. Arabella’s brother Frederick got restless in Utah and, contrary to the counsel of Brigham Young, left for California to look for gold. He wrote for a while but then stopped, and though they tried to find him and reestablish contact, they never could. Arabella sorrowed over him as long as she lived.
In the spring of 1860, the Parkinsons joined 12 other families who moved to Cache Valley and settled along the Muddy River. They called their village Green Meadows. When President Brigham Young visited in July to organize the ward, he asked them to change the name of the river to Cub Creek and the name of the town to Franklin, after Apostle Franklin D. Richards, and they obliged. For the first few years they thought they were in Utah, but when the surveys came through, Franklin proved to be the oldest town in Idaho. Samuel farmed, hauled goods to Montana, and started a store in their house. Arabella made soap, molded candles, cured meat, made the buckskin shirts and trousers that her husband and sons wore, wove the linsey-woolsey cloth (a course mixture of wool and linen or cotton) and sewed the dresses that she and her daughters wore. Often she used horsehair for thread.
Samuel worked on ditches, helped build the school, and served as constable and as a minuteman-they rode out in response to Indian raids every year. Arabella was tending store one day when an Indian man came in and threatened to kill her if she didn’t give him liquor. She kept cool and ordered him from the store, and he obeyed. Arabella’s and Samuel’s second daughter, Esther, was born February 2, 1862.
In 1863 the U.S. Army attacked the Shoshoni on Bear River, 12 miles north of Franklin, killing many hundreds of men, women, and children. The Mormons helped care for the survivors on both sides. Arabella and Samuel took in a Shoshoni boy who survived the massacre and raised him, giving him the name of Shem Parkinson. Shem was by some accounts an angry boy, hard for Arabella to handle, and even pulled a knife on Samuel once. But he joined the Church and became a deacon. He died of quick consumption in 1881. Arabella’s son Albert was born
Arabella during her trip to St. Louis, 1879 consumption in 1881. Arabella’s son Albert was born August 8, 1863 but died at 9 months. Arabella’s children write: “This caused her great sorrow. However, there were so many responsibilities crowding on her that she was forced to dismiss her sorrow as much as possible to carry out her duties.” Clara was born April 18, 1865 and Caroline November 10, 1866, making five boys and four girls born to Samuel and Arabella.
Samuel was doing well now at farming, freighting, and managing the store. According to his daughter Vivian, Samuel and Arabella discussed plural marriage even before they married. Samuel told Arabella: “You know, I know that’s true, that church. And if I join it I’m going to join it whole hand or none. And that means if there ever comes a time I think I should take another wife, I’m going to do it. So now you make up your mind because that’s what I’m going to do.
” After getting Arabella’s consent, Samuel made cautious inquiries about marrying Charlotte Smart, the daughter of his friend and business partner Thomas S. Smart. Charlotte was willing but on her father’s advice told Samuel to wait a year. She also asked him not to court her during that time, out of consideration for Arabella. They talked only briefly at Church functions, danced at parties, and were rarely if ever alone. Samuel married Charlotte in 1866. He was 35 and Charlotte 17.
Arabella, age 42, had given birth to Caroline, her youngest, just a month before. Samuel married Charlotte’s sister Maria two years later, when Maria was also 17. According to George and Caroline, Arabella lived the law of Sarah: “She knew by the revelation from God that her domestic life for time and all eternity was involved in . . . the celestial order of marriage, and upon this conviction she stepped forth and gave her husband these two wives to become the mothers of his children.” Charlotte tended Arabella’s children so Arabella could be present at Maria’s wedding.
Samuel rotated between wives, a week at each. Arabella had a house, and Charlotte and Maria lived for years in separate rooms in another one. Between the three families Samuel eventually had 32 children. The various histories depict Samuel’s homes as happy and say all three wives were peacemakers and devoted to their families. Arabella’s children were having children at the same time as the other wives, which must have meant Samuel’s two younger families got an extra portion of his attention. He had other demands that kept him away as well. He became the manager of the Franklin Co-op, which included a woolen mill and other undertakings besides the store.
He served as a counselor in the same bishopric for 30 years, which they figured was a record. In 1873 the Church sent him on an exploration mission to Arizona. He went to prison for polygamy for five months in 1886. Arabella asked if she could send a bed with him, and the marshal said no, just a quilt and pillow. So she made him a quilt with eight pounds of wool. She sent him care packages with cakes, candies, and fruit. She kept the family going and looked over his financial affairs while he was gone.




Arabella was thin, of medium height, with brown, wavy hair and brown eyes. Her children write that “her integrity was unimpeachable and that she was trustworthy in all her social and business transactions in life and has carefully trained her children in habits of industry, economy and strict morality. . . . She could endure long hours and was extremely patient and kind. She rather shunned public notoriety. She was very sensitive in the care of her husband especially when he was suffering with severe headaches.” They note: “She seldom gave a distinct order or made a rule. Her children learned from early infancy, from her attitude of mind, that if a thing were right it must be done and there ceased to be a question about it.”
Arabella made one trip East that we know of, to St. Louis in 1879, 25 years after leaving. Samuel needed to buy equipment for the woolen mill, and Arabella accompanied him. They visited Samuel’s stepfather and brothers and sisters and Arabella’s sister Clarissa.
Samuel built Arabella a large new house in Franklin, and when he got out of prison for polygamy, she had the idea of having a party for all the old folks in town. They issued invitations to all over 60, “regardless of creed or color,” as well as missionary wives, widows, and orphans. The party was such a success they decided to hold them every year. Samuel held weekly “home nights” for his three families and once a month at Arabella’s for all the families. (This was years before the Church adopted the family home evening program.) They’d visit, talk about family problems, have treats, and entertain.
As the kids left home, the three families began gathering for an annual reunion at Arabella’s. Samuel used to call them “heaven on earth.” One of Arabella’s last requests was that the family keep her home when she died as a gathering place for the annual reunions.
Arabella developed cataracts as she aged, so her sister-wife Charlotte would send her boys up to get her wood, and her girls to help with her cleaning. She died August 9, 1894. The doctor said she had no disease but that her vital organs had worn out. Samuel died 25 years later at age 88 in 1919.

Notes
1. Clarissa Chandler Alder may have been a member at this time also. We know she was baptized in 1882, but members were often rebaptized as a way to renew their covenants. John Alder died in 1852 in St. Louis. Clarissa then married Thomas Binnington.

Histories

1. George C. Parkinson and Caroline C. P. Goaslind, “Biography of Arabell Ann Chandler Parkinson.” A very adulatory history written by two of Arabella’s children. My history is largely an abridgment of this one. I have seen this history in at least two versions. One includes family data from a 1935 family reunion. Another brings it forward to 1947 and adds her physical description, etc., but omits important details from the earlier version.

2. William H. Smart, “Arabella Ann Chandler Parkinson," obituary, Deseret Evening News, 23 Aug. 1894. This is not as detailed but does give the important fact of Arabella’s tracting in Cheltenham.

3. Benson Y. Parkinson, “Samuel Rose Parkinson (1831-1919)” (Oct 2002). A companion piece to this-numerous details of Arabella and Samuel’s life together. See also sources listed there.

4. Preston Woolley Parkinson, The Family of Samuel Rose Parkinson (2001). Preston is a grandson. His treatment of Samuel includes many details of Arabella’s life.

5. Lydia Dunford Alder, “Reminiscences of the Pioneers of 1854”; Improvement Era, July 1908, 708-13; “The Massacre at Fort Laramie,” Improvement Era, June 1909, 636-38. Lydia married George Alder, Arabella’s sister Clarissa’s son. These articles give several of Samuel and Arabella’s experiences crossing the plains.

6. Thomas Ambrose Poulter, in Utah Pioneer Biographies (1964), 44:139-41, available at the Family History Library. More pioneer experiences by a trail mate.

7. Samuel Rose Parkinson, Founders’ Day Speech (1911), in Lester P. Taylor, Samuel Rose Parkinson: Portrait of a Pioneer [1977], 77-79. Details of early life in Franklin.


Biography by her son George C Parkinson and her daughter Caroline C Parkinson Goaslind
Arabell Ann Chandler Parkinson, the daughter of George Chandler and Esther Glover, was born February 27, 1824, at Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, England. Her parents were of the substantial middle class. While they may not be classed among the aristocracy, they were highly refined, well educated, honest, industrious and thrifty.

They were the parents of thirteen children, seven of whom died in infancy. The other six on record are as follows: Caroline Matilda, Clarissa, Arabell Ann, Emily Sarah, Margaret Eliza and Frederick.

George Chandler was an unusual character, being high-minded, strict in his habits, exacting in his discipline, and immaculate in his dress and personal appearance. Everything about him, both in private and in public, must conform to his social ambition. He would not recognize his own children until they were up to his standard in personal appearance.

Her mother, Esther Glover, was of modest disposition, highly refined, naturally artistic, scrupulously clean, and possessed of unusual executive ability. Arabell Ann inherited these characteristics from her parents.

The education they received consisted of their home environment, along with the school advantages in their locality at that time.

She was naturally artistic and original, a student of literature, humorous and kept up with her social surroundings. As was the customary sport at that time, she indulged in horseback riding and became quite expert.

Because of their industry and thrift, the family became prosperous and was considered among the well-to-do class. However, they were overtaken with misfortune and lost their property, part of which, if not all, went into chancery and was never recovered. The family was therefore forced to live by strict economy and industry. It was during this period that Arabell learned the art of dressmaking and millinery, and by this means she rendered valuable assistance to the family.

The family were Christian people and associated with the Protestants of their time. They read the scriptures and believed in Jesus Christ.

Under this influence the subject of this sketch grew to womanhood.

In 1839 her father died. Soon after his death, her two sisters married. Caroline married a man by the name of Ghent and moved to London. Clarissa married John Alder.

We have no information as to what became of the other two sisters. We do know however that Arabell proved to be the main support of her widowed mother and her brother Frederick. It was during this experience that they became acquainted with the "Mormon" missionaries. In 1842, she, her mother and her brother Frederick joined the church and became active members in spreading the tidings they so joyfully received.

In 1849 her mother died and her little brother Frederick was left to her sole care and protection. In the meantime, her sister Clarissa and her husband, John Alder, joined the Church and emigrated to St. Louis in 1850.

Arabell struggled on. Through her industry she was able to maintain herself and her brother and to save means so that in 1851, they were able to emigrate to St. Louis. They left Liverpool January 9, 1851, on the steamship "George W. Hourne." This company was in charge of William Gibson, Thomas Margetts and William Booth. They arrived in New Orleans and were taken by riverboat up to St. Louis. Here she engaged in her profession as dressmaker and milliner in an effort to acquire the necessary means to continue their journey to Utah.

It was here that she made the acquaintance of Samuel Rose Parkinson. After a brief courtship they were married on January 1, 1852. They remained in St. Louis until after the birth of their first child, Samuel C. Parkinson, who was born February 23, 1853.

They continued to accumulate means with which to pay their way across the plains, and, early in the spring of 1854, they joined the St. Louis company. His sister Lucy and her brother Frederick accompanied them on this journey. Most of the company had oxen, but he was among the few who had a mule team.

Trip Across the Plains

Notwithstanding their effort and care in arranging for this journey, it required almost super-human courage and determination to face the enterprise, and, above all, it required faith in God. Each day brought forth new difficulties to be overcome, not only the desert and the wilderness but also the wild beasts and the savage Indians.

On their way, they encountered herds of wild buffalo, and at one time witnessed a stampede among them. Her husband went on several buffalo hunts. While riding on one occasion, he killed a buffalo and the meat was used for food. No doubt many of the children and grand children can remember her husband, in after years, taking them on his knee and telling them the story of the buffalo hunt and then singing to them the song, "We'll Chase the Buffalo."

She performed her full share of camp duties by caring for her child, then a year old, and her brother who was but a lad. We have no record of any sensational experiences.

The company traveled on from day to day until they reached Salt Lake City some time in October, 1884. Here the company was disorganized and each family determined on its own location. They chose to locate at Kaysward, where a few of the Saints had settled. Here they began building a new home under pioneer circumstances. Her first home was a one-room log hut with a dirt floor and dirt roof. It was very hastily built because of the lateness of the season, with little or no regard for household conveniences.

Winter was soon upon them. As there had been no time in which to provide food for the animals, they had great difficulty in securing food for the winter. Her husband would often take the grass from under the snow on the side hills, bring it home in sacks and feed it to the animals, thus saving their lives.

With her usual tact, Arabell fixed up her little home with conveniences available. Thus they spent the winter.

In August, 1885, she gave birth to twin babies. She named them William and Charlotte after her husband's father and mother. While she was in bed with these babies, they experienced one of those terrific east winds which blew the rood partially off immediately above her bed, allowing the rain and wind to come in on her. Not only her life but the lives of her children were endangered, but by the providence of God, they were saved.

Her husband, became a leader in the development of the ward and its surroundings. The chief means of support was derived from gardening, farming and stock-raising. She did the sewing for her own family and for others, besides taking care of her household duties. Thus they managed to live for the next five years, during which time two more children were born: George in 1857 and Frank in 1859.

Her husband was one of the minute men during the Johnson's army experience in 1857, and was also one of the rescue party of the Salmon river missionaries, which of course took him away from home a great deal of the time.

Her brother Frederick, now about 20 Years of age, became dissatisfied with his future prospects, and, because of the gold excitement in California decided to go there and seek his fortune. For some time he kept in touch with her by letter, but finally ceased to write and was never heard from again. Every effort was made to discover his whereabouts, but without avail. This was one of the greatest sorrows that ever came into her life, which sorrow lingered with he as long as she lived.

Move to Franklin

In 1858 there was considerable speculation as to the advantages in Cache Valley. Her husband decided to make a trip to investigate. He was impressed with the locality and decided to locate at a place afterward known as Franklin. He made some slight improvement to establish a "squatter's" claim and then returned to Kaysward (Kaysville) and spent the winter.

In the early spring of 1858, they gathered together all of their belongings and made their way to Cache Valley, and they with twelve other families, located where Franklin now stands, on April 13, 1860. This was then supposed to be in Utah, but was afterward known to be the first white settlement in the State of Idaho.

These thirteen families lived in their wagon boxes for several months, and meanwhile built their log houses in formation to protect themselves against the Indians.

They immediately began their gardening and farming in preparation for the coming winter. During the summer they built the school house which they used for public worship as well as for school. This was the first school house built in Idaho.

While her husband was engaged in the outside responsibilities, she was busily engaged in the care of her children, for she did all of their sewing by hand and often used horse hair for thread. He meals were prepared with the most primitive utensils and bare necessities of food. She manufactured the soap, moulded the candles and cured the meat.

Because of additional immigration the settlement made rapid progress and was soon organized into a ward.

In the year 1862, her daughter Esther was born, and, in the meantime, her husband began the operation of a small store. He handled such commodities as the community needed, using part of their home for the store. She, with her many other duties, assisted in caring for the store.

On one occasion, while thus engaged, an Indian entered the store and demanded some liquor, threatening her life if she refused to give it to him. With a calm presence of mind and great courage she ordered him from the store thus averting what might have been a tragedy.

War at Battle Creek

In 1868, the government troops made war upon the Indians at Battle Creek, on Bear River, 12 miles north of Franklin. Most of the adult Indians were killed in the battle, leaving a great many children alive. These Indian children were distributed among the white settlers. An Indian boy whom Arabell took to raise, they named Shem. He was of a savage, suspicious nature and was very difficult to manage. This added much to her responsibility.

During this year her son Albert was born. He lived only nine months. This caused her great sorrow. However, there were so many responsibilities crowding on her that she was forced to dismiss her sorrow as much as possible in order to carry on her duties.

In 1865 her daughter was born. In 1866 her ninth child, Caroline, was born. This made a family of five boys and four girls, and one Indian boy they raised from childhood. This of course meant great industry and good management.

Plural Marriage

We approach this phase of her life with a desire to do full justice to all concerned. Plural marriage was a tenet of her faith and then all worthy men were required to accept and obey this law. Her husband, also a firm believer, felt it was his duty to obey this law. In 1865 he married Charlotte Smart and in 1867 he married her sister Maria Smart.

It required supreme faith and confidence in God to undergo this experience. She knew by the revelation from God that her domestic life for time and all eternity was involved in this order of the priesthood, or the celestial order of marriage, and upon this conviction she stepped forth and gave to her husband those two wives to become the mothers of his children.

She did not court notoriety but was content to live a domestic life in her own home. She believed in doing right for the love of right and not through fear of punishment, and she instilled this principle into her children.

In her there was an atmosphere of goodness. She seldom gave a distinct order or made a rule. Her children learned from early infancy, from her attitude of mind, that if a thing were right it must be done and there ceased to be a question about it. By this course of life, she commanded the respect of the three families and of all who made her acquaintance. She was honest, just and charitable, and in the promotion of these characteristics it was truthfully said of her at her death, "She was the peace-maker," thus exemplifying the instructions of our Savior, "Blessed is the Peace-Maker."

As would be expected, when these new members were added to the family more house room became a necessity and these were provided as fast as circumstances would permit. The conveniences and house environments were kept abreast of the other families in the community.

The children were taught to be industrious and self-supporting. They were believers and promoters of education and as they obtained all the education afforded locally the children were sent to more advanced schools for higher education. The four boys filled foreign missions and the girls became efficient as schoolteachers and homemakers.

Arabell's husband was the leading merchant and was a successful businessman. He was a member of the bishopric of the ward and in keeping with the growth of the settlement he built a spacious new home and here she entertained her many friends among whom were many of the general authorities. At the time the raid was being made on the polygamist families her husband was arrested and served six months in the Boise penitentiary for this offense and paid a three hundred dollar fine.

It was Arabell who conceived the idea of providing some social pleasure for the aged and unfortunate and to this end it was decided to have such a gathering in her new home. Invitations were sent out to all over sixty years of age and to the widows and the orphans. This was regardless of creed or color. She provided refreshments and a program was arranged. This gathering was a pronounced success and many expressed appreciation and good will. Because of the success it was decided to make it an annual occasion and was so continued for the rest of her life. It was out of this that the idea of family gatherings was introduced. She sponsored the idea and among her last requests was one that her home be kept as a family gathering place for the family reunions. A number of years before her death a family organization was effected and reunions of the three families were held once a year in the home. These reunions were very successfully carried out and were enjoyed by all. She was liberal with her contributions and when the Relief Society of the church adopted the policy of storing wheat she became a strong advocate of the move and was very strict in paying her allotment. Hers was a strenuous life. She is now approaching the end. Let us review in brief some of her rich experiences.

She had a family of nine children, thirty-four grand children and one great grand child. From the time she joined the Church in England until the time of her death she has been a leading figure in the pioneer experiences of the Church. Without the least show of vanity we can truly say of her that her integrity was unimpeachable and that she was trustworthy in all her social and business transactions in life and has carefully trained her children in habits of industry, economy and strict morality. She has given to them the best facilities for education that the country in her day afforded.

After an illness of nine days duration she passed peacefully away on August 9, 1894. She was a true wife and a loving mother, a safe and wise counselor and lived to see the fruits of her maternal labors in that her children are all faithful Latter-day Saints and are respected members of society. She had a firm testimony of the gospel and the highest aim and ambition of her life was to observe its teachings and to establish an example that her children might emulate.

Among her last admonitions to her family was to be united and to perpetuate the sentiments of love and family reunion in their homes. On April 6, 1935 there were eighty-five of her descendants met in her honor at the 20th Ward Relief Society Hall in Salt Lake City. A suitable program was given and refreshments served. On this date her descendants numbered as follows: nine children, 66 grand-children, 167 great grandchildren, 55 great great grandchildren and 87 in-laws. Total 382.

At the family reunion held July 21, 1947 her descendants numbered as follows:

Children 9
Grand Children 68
Great Grand children 184
Great Great Grand children 175
Great Great Great Grand children 18

Total 454
In-laws 144
---------------
598

An account of the descendants of Samuel Rose Parkinson, July 21, 1947.

Descendants In-laws
Arabell Ann Chandler Parkinson 454 144
Charlotte Smart Parkinson 280 79
Maria Smart Parkinson 204 76
----------------
938 299

Grand total 1237

Description and Other Details

Arabell was of slight build, medium height, fair complexion with brown curly hair and brown eyes. She was easy to become acquainted with and an interesting conversationalist. She was a splendid cook, a good economist and executive. She was not robust but wiry and active, could endure long hours and was extremely patient and kind. She rather shunned public notoriety. She was very sensitive to the care of her husband especially when he was suffering with severe headaches. When her husband was sentenced to prison at Boise, Idaho for his religious belief, she asked the officers if she might send a good bed with him. The answer was: "No. You may send one quilt and one pillow." She manifested her thoughtful devotion by providing an unusual quilt, having eight pounds of wool in it, also sent a nice soft pillow and would also send a box of fresh fruits, cake, candies, etc. occasionally.

In his absence she looked to the care of his numerous family and guarded carefully his financial interests. She had good health up to the time of her death. The doctor said she had no disease but her vital organs had worn out. She was sick nine days and passed away with but very little pain or suffering.



Biography by Benson Y. Parkinson
Arabella Ann Chandler was born February 27, 1824, in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, England, the fourth child of George Chandler and Esther Glover. The family group sheets give her name as Arabella, though in her history her children George and Caroline call her “Arabell Ann,” so maybe that’s how she pronounced her name. Arabella’s parents had thirteen children, of which seven died in childhood. George and Caroline describe their grandparents this way:

“George Chandler was an unusual character, being high-minded, strict in his habits, exacting in his discipline, and immaculate in his dress and personal appearance. Everything about him, both in private and in public, must conform to his social ambition. He would not recognize his own children until they were up to his standard in personal appearance.

“. . . Esther Glover, was of modest disposition, highly refined, naturally artistic, scrupulously clean, and possessed of unusual executive ability. Arabell Ann inherited these characteristics from her parents.”

The Chandlers went to church and read the Bible in the home.

Arabella’s family was prosperous. She went to school, studied literature, and spent a lot of time horse back riding. But then her father suffered a financial reversal. Much of their property was tied up in litigation and was never recovered. Arabella learned dress-making and millinery (women’s hat making) to help support the family. George died in 1839, when Arabella was about 15. Before long, Arabella was supporting her mother and brother Frederick, who was only 5 when their father died.

In 1842, Esther, Arabella, and Frederick were baptized into The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Arabella was 18 at the time. Arabella did missionary work by distributing tracts door-to-door in Cheltenham. In 1849, when Arabella was 25, her mother died. Arabella’s sister Clarissa and her husband John Alder, a member of the Church since 1842, emigrated to St. Louis in 1850.1 Arabella saved her money and earned enough for her and Frederick to follow them in 1851. They sailed with a company of Saints on the George W. Bourne to New Orleans and then by riverboat to St. Louis. Arabella worked at dressmaking and millinery to try to earn enough money to continue on to Zion. She met a recent convert, Samuel Rose Parkinson, also English, and married him on January 1, 1852. She was 27 at the time, and he just 20.

Samuel was doing well as a drayman (someone who hauls things for a living), owned his teams, and had money in the bank. Their first child, Samuel Chandler, was born February 23, 1853. The Parkinsons left their home and business in 1854 to come to Utah, bringing Frederick as well as Samuel’s little sister Lucy with them. Arabella had to cook over buffalo chips, and once they saw a buffalo stampede. They encountered Indians, including a party of 350 fresh from raiding, whom the pioneers fed and gave gifts. The Parkinsons and their company narrowly escaped a massacre at Fort Laramie.

Arabella and Samuel moved first to Kaysville. Samuel built her a log house with a dirt roof and a dirt floor. On August 1, 1855, she had a girl, Charlotte, and the next day, August 2, Charlotte’s twin brother, William. Arabella was in bed with them when a storm blew a part of the roof off the house, drenching mother and babies with rain and mud, but they pulled through. Samuel gardened, raised stock, ran a threshing machine, and worked on the fort. Arabella kept house and sewed for her family and for hire. Their son George was born July 18, 1857. Samuel was called up in the Utah War and spent much of that winter on guard duty in the cliffs in Echo Canyon. On July 7, 1859, they had another son, Franklin. Arabella’s brother Frederick got restless in Utah and, contrary to the counsel of Brigham Young, left for California to look for gold. He wrote for a while but then stopped, and though they tried to find him and reestablish contact, they never could. Arabella sorrowed over him as long as she lived.

In the spring of 1860, the Parkinsons joined 12 other families who moved to Cache Valley and settled along the Muddy River. They called their village Green Meadows. When President Brigham Young visited in July to organize the ward, he asked them to change the name of the river to Cub Creek and the name of the town to Franklin, after Apostle Franklin D. Richards, and they obliged. For the first few years they thought they were in Utah, but when the surveys came through, Franklin proved to be the oldest town in Idaho. Samuel farmed, hauled goods to Montana, and started a store in their house. Arabella made soap, molded candles, cured meat, made the buckskin shirts and trousers that her husband and sons wore, wove the linsey-woolsey cloth (a course mixture of wool and linen or cotton) and sewed the dresses that she and her daughters wore. Often she used horsehair for thread.

Samuel worked on ditches, helped build the school, and served as constable and as a minuteman—they rode out in response to Indian raids every year. Arabella was tending store one day when an Indian man came in and threatened to kill her if she didn’t give him liquor. She kept cool and ordered him from the store, and he obeyed. Arabella’s and Samuel’s second daughter, Esther, was born February 2, 1862.

In 1863 the U.S. Army attacked the Shoshoni on Bear River, 12 miles north of Franklin, killing many hundreds of men, women, and children. The Mormons helped care for the survivors on both sides. Arabella and Samuel took in a Shoshoni boy who survived the massacre and raised him, giving him the name of Shem Parkinson. Shem was by some accounts an angry boy, hard for Arabella to handle, and even pulled a knife on Samuel once. But he joined the Church and became a deacon. He died of quick consumption in 1881. Arabella’s son Albert was born August 8, 1863 but died at 9 months. Arabella’s children write: “This caused her great sorrow. However, there were so many responsibilities crowding on her that she was forced to dismiss her sorrow as much as possible to carry out her duties.” Clara was born April 18, 1865 and Caroline November 10, 1866, making five boys and four girls born to Samuel and Arabella.

Samuel was doing well now at farming, freighting, and managing the store. According to his daughter Vivian, Samuel and Arabella discussed plural marriage even before they married. Samuel told Arabella: “You know, I know that’s true, that church. And if I join it I’m going to join it whole hand or none. And that means if there ever comes a time I think I should take another wife, I’m going to do it. So now you make up your mind because that’s what I’m going to do.” After getting Arabella’s consent, Samuel made cautious inquiries about marrying Charlotte Smart, the daughter of his friend and business partner Thomas S. Smart. Charlotte was willing but on her father’s advice told Samuel to wait a year. She also asked him not to court her during that time, out of consideration for Arabella. They talked only briefly at Church functions, danced at parties, and were rarely if ever alone. Samuel married Charlotte in 1866. He was 35 and Charlotte 17. Arabella, age 42, had given birth to Caroline, her youngest, just a month before. Samuel married Charlotte’s sister Maria two years later, when Maria was also 17. According to George and Caroline, Arabella lived the law of Sarah: “She knew by the revelation from God that her domestic life for time and all eternity was involved in . . . the celestial order of marriage, and upon this conviction she stepped forth and gave her husband these two wives to become the mothers of his children.” Charlotte tended Arabella’s children so Arabella could be present at Maria’s wedding.

Samuel rotated between wives, a week at each. Arabella had a house, and Charlotte and Maria lived for years in separate rooms in another one. Between the three families Samuel eventually had 32 children. The various histories depict Samuel’s homes as happy and say all three wives were peacemakers and devoted to their families. Arabella’s children were having children at the same time as the other wives, which must have meant Samuel’s two younger families got an extra portion of his attention. He had other demands that kept him away as well. He became the manager of the Franklin Co-op, which included a woolen mill and other undertakings besides the store. He served as a counselor in the same bishopric for 30 years, which they figured was a record. In 1873 the Church sent him on an exploration mission to Arizona. He went to prison for polygamy for five months in 1886. Arabella asked if she could send a bed with him, and the marshal said no, just a quilt and pillow. So she made him a quilt with eight pounds of wool. She sent him care packages with cakes, candies, and fruit. She kept the family going and looked over his financial affairs while he was gone.

Arabella was thin, of medium height, with brown, wavy hair and brown eyes. Her children write that “her integrity was unimpeachable and that she was trustworthy in all her social and business transactions in life and has carefully trained her children in habits of industry, economy and strict morality. . . . She could endure long hours and was extremely patient and kind. She rather shunned public notoriety. She was very sensitive in the care of her husband especially when he was suffering with severe headaches.” They note: “She seldom gave a distinct order or made a rule. Her children learned from early infancy, from her attitude of mind, that if a thing were right it must be done and there ceased to be a question about it.”

Arabella made one trip East that we know of, to St. Louis in 1879, 25 years after leaving. Samuel needed to buy equipment for the woolen mill, and Arabella accompanied him. They visited Samuel’s stepfather and brothers and sisters and Arabella’s sister Clarissa.

Samuel built Arabella a large new house in Franklin, and when he got out of prison for polygamy, she had the idea of having a party for all the old folks in town. They issued invitations to all over 60, “regardless of creed or color,” as well as missionary wives, widows, and orphans. The party was such a success they decided to hold them every year. Samuel held weekly “home nights” for his three families and once a month at Arabella’s for all the families. (This was years before the Church adopted the family home evening program.) They’d visit, talk about family problems, have treats, and entertain. As the kids left home, the three families began gathering for an annual reunion at Arabella’s. Samuel used to call them “heaven on earth.” One of Arabella’s last requests was that the family keep her home when she died as a gathering place for the annual reunions.

Arabella developed cataracts as she aged, so her sister-wife Charlotte would send her boys up to get her wood, and her girls to help with her cleaning. She died August 9, 1894. The doctor said she had no disease but that her vital organs had worn out. Samuel died 25 years later at age 88 in 1919.

Notes

1. Clarissa Chandler Alder may have been a member at this time also. We know she was baptized in 1882, but members were often rebaptized as a way to renew their covenants. John Alder died in 1852 in St. Louis. Clarissa then married Thomas Binnington.

Histories

George C. Parkinson and Caroline C. P. Goaslind, “Biography of Arabell Ann Chandler Parkinson.” A very adulatory history written by two of Arabella’s children. My history is largely an abridgment of this one. I have seen this history in at least two versions. One includes family data from a 1935 family reunion. Another brings it forward to 1947 and adds her physical description, etc., but omits important details from the earlier version.
William H. Smart, “Arabella Ann Chandler Parkinson," obituary, Deseret Evening News, 23 Aug. 1894. This is not as detailed but does give the important fact of Arabella’s tracting in Cheltenham.
Benson Y. Parkinson, “Samuel Rose Parkinson (1831–1919)” (Oct 2002). A companion piece to this—numerous details of Arabella and Samuel’s life together. See also sources listed there.
Preston Woolley Parkinson, The Family of Samuel Rose Parkinson (2001). Preston is a grandson. His treatment of Samuel includes many details of Arabella’s life.
Lydia Dunford Alder, “Reminiscences of the Pioneers of 1854”; Improvement Era, July 1908, 708–13; “The Massacre at Fort Laramie,” Improvement Era, June 1909, 636–38. Lydia married George Alder, Arabella’s sister Clarissa’s son. These articles give several of Samuel and Arabella’s experiences crossing the plains.
Thomas Ambrose Poulter, in Utah Pioneer Biographies (1964), 44:139–41, available at the Family History Library. More pioneer experiences by a trailmate.
Samuel Rose Parkinson, Founders’ Day Speech (1911), in Lester P. Taylor, Samuel Rose Parkinson: Portrait of a Pioneer [1977], 77–79. Details of early life in Franklin. 
Chandler, Arabella Ann (I21116)
 
18 In Donald Benson Alder and Elsie L. Alder, comp., The Benson Family: The Ancestory and Descendants of Ezra T. Benson (The Ezra T. Benson Genealogical Society, Inc., 1979), 224
Lucinda West was the widow of Joseph West. She was born 22 Oct 1826 at Ulysses, Seneca, New York, the daughter of William and Elizabeth Barton. Lucinda West received her patriarchal blessing 9 Sept 1845 by Joseph William Smith in Nauvoo, Illinois. Lucinda was endowed by the name of Lucinda West at Nauvoo 21 Jan 1846, and she was sealed to Ezra T. Benson 18 March 1847 at Winter Quarters, Indian Territory. This was solemnized by Pres. Brigham Young, witnesses, Heber C. Kimball and O. Pratt.

Joseph West was born 23 June 1822 in Venango County, New York, the son of Alva West and Sally Benedict. Joseph West became a carpenter on the Nauvoo Temple; also he was set apart as an ordinance worker in the Nauvoo Temple, 7 Feb 1846.

Joseph West died in 1846, place unknown.

Nothing further is known of Lucinda West Benson. It is not known whether she crossed the plains or not.

(http://etb.bensonfamily.org/wives-kids/lucinda-alder.htm) 
Barton, Lucinda (I122735)
 
19 !1787 census of Vejlby, Odense, Denmark GS#039,000

BIRTH: Vejlby Church Rec. GS#050,482 
Madsen, Niels (I2971)
 
20 !1787 Census of Vejlby, Odense, Denmark GS#039,000

Occupation: Small landholder

MARRIAGE: Kavslunde Church Rec. GS#050,249

DEATH: Vejlby Church Rec. GS#050,483 
Jorgensen, Mads (I2964)
 
21 !1787 censusOf Vejlby, Odense, Denmark GS#039,000

BIRTH: Vejlby Church Rec. GS#050,482

DEATH: Vejlby Church Rec. GS#050,484

TEMPLE_WORK: Archives

MARRIAGE: Vejlby Church Rec. GS#050,483 
Madsdatter, Ane Marie (I2945)
 
22 !1787 censusOf Vejlby, Odense, Denmark GS#039,000

BIRTH: Vejlby Church Rec. GS#050,482 
Madsdatter, Karen Margrethe (I2967)
 
23 !1787 censusOf Vejlby, Odense, Denmark GS#039,000

BIRTH: Vejlby Church Rec. GS#050,482 
Madsdatter, Mette Cathrine (I2968)
 
24 !1787 censusOf Vejlby, Odense, Denmark GS#039,000

BIRTH: Vejlby Church Rec. GS#050,482 
Madsdatter, Maren (I2969)
 
25 !1787 censusOf Vejlby, Odense, Denmark GS#039,000

BIRTH: Vejlby Church Rec. GS#050,482 
Madsdatter, Birthe Margrethe (I2970)
 
26 !1787 censusOf Vejlby, Odense, Denmark GS#039,000 Nielsdatter, Ane (I2965)
 
27 !1834 Census of Gelsted, Vends Herred, Odense, Denmark GS#039,074

Occupation: Servant

BIRTH: Gelsted Church Rec. GS#050,220

MARRIAGE: Vejlby Church Rec. GS#050,483

DEATH: Vejlby Church Rec. GS#050,484

TEMPLE_WORK: Archives 
Jensen, Niels (I2944)
 
28 !Also Emma, Ehm on christening records.

!BIRTH: Taarnby Church Rec GS#048,408

!DEATH: Declo LDS Ward Rec. GS#007,436 and Cassia Stake Form E 
Bendtsdatter, Ehm (I2463)
 
29 !Anglo-Saxon Bishops, Kings and Nobles, Eng 104 p. 255; The Royal Line of Succession A16A225 , p. 5; Keiser und Koenig Hist. Gene Hist 25 pt.1 p. 93. Beldegsson, Brand (I14207)
 
30 !Anglo-Saxon Bishops, Kings and Nobles, Eng 104 p. 255; The Saga Library, F Ice 1, "Heimskring la" Vol. 1 p. 16, Vol. 2 p. 148; The Viking Age, Gene Hist 19 Vol. 1 p. 28-68.

Ancestry and Progentry of Captain James Blount - Immigrant, by RobertF. Pfafman, p E-34. 
Frithugarsson, Freawine (I14326)
 
31 !Anglo-Saxon Bishops, Kings and Nobles, Eng 104 p. 255; The Saga Library, F Ice 1, "Heimskringla" Vol. 1 p. 16, Vol. 2 p. 148; The Viking Age, Gene Hist 19 Vol. 1 p. 28-68. There are several different spellings for this person's name. Odinsson, Beldeg King of West Saxons (I13955)
 
32 !Anglo-Saxon Bishops, Kings and Nobles, Eng 104 p. 255; The SagaLibrary, F Ice 1, "Heimskring la" Vol. 1 p. 16, Vol. 2 p. 148; The Viking Age, Gene Hist 19 Vol. 1 p. 28-68.

Ancestry and Progentry of Captain James Blount - Immigrant, by Robert F. Pfafman, p E-34. 
Wig (I14768)
 
33 !Anglo-Saxon Bishops, Kings and Nobles, Eng 104 p. 255; The SagaLibrary, F Ice 1, "Heimskring la" Vol. 1 p. 16, Vol. 2 p. 148; The Viking Age, Gene Hist 19 Vol. 1 p. 28-68.

Ancestry and Progentry of Captain James Blount - Immigrant, by Robert F. Pfafman, p E-34. 
Gewis (Giurs) (I14797)
 
34 !Baptism and endowment performed by Terry R. Whipple.

!Death: U.S., Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014 
Whipple, Orley Keeling (I60)
 
35 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I449)
 
36 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I92184)
 
37 !Birth: California Birth Index, 1905-1995

!Death: U.S., Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014 
Haile, Alton Bertine (I4953)
 
38 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I33)
 
39 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I4711)
 
40 !BIRTH: Copy of birth certificate in the possession of Steven Whipple.

!Death: U.S., Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014

!DEATH: Obituary, Salt Lake Tribune
Edna Bennett Duncan, age 82, died 26 October 1995, in Midvale, Utah.

Born 27 August 1913, in Meadow, Millard County, Utah, to William Hyrumand Elizabeth Bushnell Bennett.

A tribute to a very special lady. Our beloved mother,
grandmother,great-grandmother, sister and friend, Edna Bennett Duncan, passed awaypeacefully at the home of her daughter, Anna Jo Wayne. She is now withher eternal companion, Floyd E Duncan, who preceded h erin death, 4October 1994. It will now be their: "O' be Joyful, Day !"She lived alif efull of service to others. She served as a Prima ryteacher forove r 25years, stake board member, state registrar, pa stmember SegoLil y CampDUP, past member Uintah Chapter DAR. She liv edin the samehom e andLDS Ward for over 50 years.

Survived by four daughters: Floris (Alton B.) Haile, Dayle (Clyde L.)White, Anna Jo (John K.) Wayne and Edna Ruth (Keith L.) Hilton;sister, Leona Besendorfer; brother, Vaun M. (Phillis) Bennett;sister-in-law, Marie Bennett; also 19 grandchildren and tengreat-grandchildren.

Funeral services on Saturday, 28 October 1995 at 12 noon, Salt Lake12th Ward, 630 East 100 South. Friends may call at the LarkinMortuary ,260 East South Temple, Friday from 7-9 p.m. and at the wardon Saturday, 11-11:45 a.m. Interment, Larkin Sunset Gardens.

!MARRIAGE: Copy of Marriage Certificate in the possession of
Steven Whipple

!MARRIAGE: Temple Marriage Certificate in the possession of
Dayle Duncan 
Bennett, Edna (I4697)
 
41 !BIRTH: Copy of birth certificate in the possession of Steven Whipple.

!Death: U.S., Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014

!DEATH: Obituary, Salt Lake Tribune
Floyd E Duncan, beloved husband, father, grandfather, brother and friend passed away October 4, 1994 at the home of his daughter Anna Jo Wayne.

Born October 23, 1911 in Meadow, Millard County, Utah the son of Elmer J and Ethel Stott Duncan. Married Edna Bennett, November 21, 1934 in Salt Lake City. Solemnized May 10, 1956 in the Salt Lake LDS Temple. They lived in the same house and attended the Salt Lake 12th Ward for 50 years.

Attended LDS Business College. Served a Stake Mission, was Bishop ofthe 12th Ward, Bishop's Councilor, 70's President, teacher, temple veil worker and many other church capacities. Member of Junior Chamber of Commerce and life member of Sons of Utah Pioneers. Avid sportsman and gardner. Worked at Garfield Smelter, manager of plumbing and heating for Montgomery Ward and operated own business, Intermountain Sales.

Survivors: his beloved wife Edna, of Salt Lake City; four daughters ,Floris (Alton B.) Haile and Dayle (Clyde L.) White, both of Salt La keCity; Anna Jo (John K.) Wayne of Midvale and Edna Ruth (Keith L. )Hilton of West Valley City; 19 grand children and nine great-grandchildren; sister and brothers, Lola Bushnell of Meadow, Utah; Stanle y(Lou) Duncan of St. George and Stott (Shirley) Duncan of Moab. Preceded in death by parents, infant sister Edna, brother Ken, sister-in-law Gwen and brother-in-law Lee.

Funeral services Saturday, October 8, 1994, 12:00 noon, Salt Lake 12th Ward Chapel, 630 E. 100 South. Friends may call at Larkin Mortuar y,260 E. South Temple, Friday 6-8 pm and at the church Saturday, one hour prior to the Service. Interment: Larkin Sunset Gardens.

!BIRTH: Copy of Birth Certificate in the possession of Dayle Duncan

!MARRIAGE: Copy of Marriage Certificate in the possession of Steven Whipple

!MARRIAGE: Temple Marriage Certificate in the possession of Dayle Duncan 
Duncan, Floyd Elmer (I4698)
 
42 !BIRTH: Date from the Sprague Database (Mail from Dick Weber [REWeber at sprague-database dot org] to Weldon Whipple, received 23 Oct 1997. On the Internet at http://www.sprague-database.org) Jenckes, Abigail (I730)
 
43 !BIRTH: David Jillson, "Descendants of Capt. John Whipple, of Providence, R.I.," New-England Historical and Genealogical Register, 32 (1878): 405, gives birth date of 18 Dec 1696.

!PARENTS: Henry E. Whipple, in A Brief Genealogy of the Whipple Families Who Settled in Rhode Island (Providence: A. Crawford Greene, 1873), p. 58, gives Noah's father as Thomas and Abigail (Jencks) Whipple. Both D. Jillson and Joanne Lahr-Kreischer (in a note dated 20 Nov 1997), identify Noah's father as Noah B. Whipple, Thomas' brother.

!SOURCE: Clara Hammond McGuigan, The Antecedents and Descendants of Noah Whipple of the Rogerene Community at Quakertown, Connecticut (Ithaca, N.Y.: J.M. Kingsbury, 1971), p. 35.

!SOURCE: Will of wife's mother's step mother Mary (Mason) Dexter, dated 25 Dec 1753, proved 18 Feb 1754. In Providence, Rhode Island, Wills, Vol. 5, 1754-1770. Abstracted in Lucille B. Beaman, "Abstracts of Providence, Rhode Island, Wills," Rhode Island Genealogical Register, vol. 4, no. 2 (Oct 1981), p. 158.

!SOURCE: James N. Arnold, Vital Record of Rhode Island, 1636-1850. Vol. 2, Providence, Part 1 (Providence: Narragansett Historical Pub. Co., 1892), p. 57, 198.

!SOURCE: Will of grandfather Samuel Whipple, dated 9 Mar 1710/11, proved 20 Mar 1710/11, p. 181-2. Abstracted in Abstracts Providence Wills, Rhode Island Genealogical Register, vol. 12, p. 151. 
Whipple, Noah Jr (I18031)
 
44 !Birth: England Births and Christenings, 1538-1975

!Immigration: Came to New South Wales, Australia on the "Royal Saxon" 17 Jul 1841. New South Wales, Australia, Assisted Immigrant Passenger Lists, 1828-1896 
Harris, George (I9840)
 
45 !Birth: England, Births and Christenings, 1538-1975
!Christening: England, Births and Christenings, 1538-1975 
Handley, Vera May (I44720)
 
46 !Birth: Idaho, Birth Index, 1861-1912, Stillbirth Index, 1905-1962

!DEATH: , U.S., Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014

!Obituary: Salt Lake Tribune

Don Giles Nelson, 80, of Salt Lake City, passed away Jan. 25, 1985 of natural causes. Born Sept. 15, 1904 Preston, Idaho to Joseph G. and Alemeda Giles Nelson. Married Gladys Benson Dec. 8, 1930 in Evanston, Wyoming; later solemnized in the Logan LDS Temple. He served a mission in the Hawaiian Islands. He learned responsibility early in life, running a farm at the age of 12. He earned an associate degree from Utah State College. Taught auto mechanics and body and fender repair at Utah Tech. He ran his own business for many years. He took great joy in the achievements of his children. He left them a great legacy: The value of honest work. Survived by his wife, Gladys, children, Kaye Fred, Mrs. A. Eugene (Frankie) Whipple, Mrs. John (Lorraine) Brown, all Salt Lake City; 14 grandchildren, nine great-grandchildren; brothers and sister, Scott G., Phoenix, Ariz.; Mrs. Ed (Anna) Laub, Carson City, Nevada; Jarl G., Boise, Idaho; John A., Salt Lake City. Funeral services Monday, 12 noon, Mountain View Memorial Estates, 3115 East 7800 South, where friends may call one hour prior to services. Internment Mountain View Memorial Estates. Funeral directors Memorial Estates Mortuary.

!LDS Mission:
Hawaiian
Sandwich Islands

October 1922–1924
Age Called: 18
Hawaii

Set Apart: 10 October 1922
End Date: 1924
Departed From Home: 7 November 1922
Priesthood office: Elder
Priesthood: Elder
Called From: Preston, Franklin, Idaho, United States
Set apart by: Richard R Lyman 
Nelson, Don Giles (I78)
 
47 !Birth: Idaho, Birth Index, 1861-1912, Stillbirth Index, 1905-1962

!Death: California, Death Index, 1940-1997 
Nelson, Joseph Lynn (I85)
 
48 !Birth: Idaho, Birth Index, 1861-1912, Stillbirth Index, 1905-1962

!DEATH: U.S., Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014

!Obituary: Salt Lake Tribune
Gladys Benson Nelson, 85, died January 27, 1995.

She was born November 12, 1909 in Preston, Idaho to Elizabeth Greaves Eames and Frank Taft Benson. She married Don Giles Nelson on December 8, 1930. The marriage was later solemnized in the Logan LDS Temple.

Gladys earned a teaching certificate from the Utah State Agricultural College and taught for several years, both before and after her marriage. Later she worked for many years at the Shriner's Crippled Children's Hospital, where she gave the most tender care to the children placed in her charge.

Our dear mother devoted most of her energy to her children and grandchildren. She also nursed her husband and two sisters through their last painful months on earth. No one has given more love, more time, and more energy to her family than she. She provided protection and security for all of us.

Next to her family, Gladys best loved books and the study of
history. She was a true scholar.

She is survived by two sisters, Carmen Lewis and Zenda Mabey, a son ,Kaye F., two daughters, Frankie and Lorraine, and their spouses; 14 grandchildren and 21 great-grandchildren.

Funeral services will be Tuesday, January 31 at 12 noon at the Memorial Estates Mortuary, 3115 East 7800 South, where friends may call one hour prior to the services.

MEMORIAL SERVICE
for
GLADYS BENSON NELSON
Officiating: Bishop K.F.Nelson
Family Prayer: Terry Whipple
Prelude Music: Dawn Moschetti
Invocation: Marilyn Nelson
Obituary: K.F.Nelson
Musical Number: The Lord's Prayer....
Terry and Susan Whipple
Memories of Grandmother: read by
Alicia and John (Tig) Brown
Vocal Solo: Amazing Grace.....Lyn Stanton
accompanied by Susan Whipple
Remarks: K.F. Nelson
Vocal Solo: How Great Thou Art....Lyn Stanton
accompanied by Susan Whipple
Benediction: Benson Lewis
Postlude: Dawn Moschetti
Dedication of the Grave: Eugene Whipple 
Benson, Gladys (I79)
 
49 !Birth: Idaho, Birth Index, 1861-1912, Stillbirth Index, 1905-1962

!Death: U.S., Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014 
Nelson, Ephraim Benson (I87)
 
50 !Birth: Idaho, Birth Index, 1861-1912, Stillbirth Index, 1905-1962

!DEATH: U.S., Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014 
Nelson, Scott Giles (I89)
 

      1 2 3 4 5 ... 39» Next»