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1 Arthur James Talbot was born October 24, 1868, at West Jordan, Salt Lake County, Utah, the son of Thomas Benjamin and Margaret Alice Wiggill Talbot. He was the 4th child of a family of nine children, five boys and four girls. Two girls and one boy died in childhood with the dreadful disease of Diptheria. People didn't have the modern methods that science has found of giving antitoxin to prevent and also kill the disease, therefore they just had to doctor them the best they knew how. The two little girls died within a few days of each other, and the boy a few weeks later.
Arthur's parents came from South Africa where his grandparents had been called from England, to help colonize that country in 1820. Arthur's parents were born in South Africa and lived there until about 1861. About the year 1853 or 1854, the Mormon Elders came to their home and they were converted to the Mormon Church. The Elder was a Mr. Walker. They were baptized and later sold their property and came to Utah. They first settled at West Jordan where Arthur was born, then they moved to Kaysville and lived there and in Layton. Things didn't go too smooth there, so they moved to Leamington, Utah, which was just a new country in the making. The Talbot's were well fixed and pretty well to do when they left South Africa, owning a lot of land and cattle. When they sold out there they purchased quite a lot of goods such as cloth and things they could use but by the time they arrived in Leamington, their supply was pretty well exhausted and they were in a new country and had a very hard time there. The children had to work whenever they could to help support the family. Arthur went out to herd sheep. His Father owned a small bunch and Father used to take him and his younger brother, Thomas, over across the river on the foothills and leave them for a week at a time. He left them the wagon box with cover to sleep in and would go out once a week to take food and see if they were all right.
Arthur never had much schooling. There weren't many schools and teachers in those days, and the parents had to pay so much a term, (ten weeks) and they wasn't financially able to send them all, so they took turns, one would go a week then another would go a week, which didn't get them very far. This was in Leamington. After they came to Oak City, the chance for school was a little better in a way, but the boys had grown quite large and had to be in a class with much younger and smaller boys. This somewhat embarrassed them, so they quit school and worked wherever they could to earn a little to help out with the living for the family.
Arthur went to work for John Lovell to get out railroad ties from the mountains, and he paid him 50 cents a day for his work, half wheat and half store pay (that was getting things out of the store for pay). Arthur afterwards took the job of herding sheep for other sheepmen. He also leased them sometimes and for this he done fairly good. But one time the price of wool and sheep went down so low that he went broke and lost real heavy. After this Arthur decided to buy him a farm and start farming, and this he did. He owned a little piece of land in Leamington which he sold and went to Hinckley, Utah, and bought him a forty acre piece of ground with a pretty good house and flowing well on it. But then he had nothing to farm it with, no team, Harness, or wagon or implements to till the soil, so he had a very old friend, William Alldredge by name, who was very good to him. He had earlier run a freight team hauling ore from out west so he had some old wagons, harnesses and horses. He fitted Arthur out with it and told him he could pay for it when he could and not to worry about it, so this is what he did. As time went on and he got raising something on his farm, he paid for it and bought other machinery that was needed to run the farm with.
Still there was something else needed there, as it was lonesome alone and no one to cook his meals for him. He decided he wanted to get someone to keep him company and cook for him and keep house, so he became acquainted and fell in love with Miss Clara Elizabeth Theobald whom he married on May 13, 1896 in the Manti Temple. They built a house later on in Hinckley, Utah. and at this place he had five children born to him. He stayed there for several years working hard to take care of his family, but the grasshoppers got bad and took the crops for two or three years and the land became waterlogged and he became dissatisfied. His Father was getting old and couldn't run his farm much longer so he wanted Arthur to come and take it over and run it. So he moved to Oak City and bought 50 acres of Simeon Walker and put it in to hay as soon as he could get it prepared.


He held several positions in the church. He was instructor of the Deacon's for awhile and also a Ward Teacher.
Things went along fairly well till 1918, when the flu struck the country after the World War I. Arthur took the flu but apparently did not seem to be of a serious nature and got some better and worked on the farm some, but the next year he began to get weaker and very pale and developed leakage of the heart and his blood turned to water. All the red corpuscles were destroyed. He went to the L. D.S. Hospital in Salt Lake City and they gave him blood transfusions from his two oldest sons. This helped for a short time but soon that blood was gone and he was bad again. Dropsy also developed and he finally died May 29, 1922 at Oak City at the age of 54 years.
He was the Father of 13 children, 7 boys and 6 girls. There are now 78 Grand and great grandchildren.
A well respected family remains to call him blessed.

Written by his wife, Clara E. Talbot 1952



Arthur James Talbot
He moved from Leamington to Hinckley. He had a hard time to buy a farm because he didn't have any money. He finally was able to get a farm about a mile east of Hinckley. He didn't have any machinery or team but Uncle Will's father ran the freight line and had horse and harnesses so father went to him and asked if he could help him out. He said I have a team I'll let you have and harnesses and you can pay me when you get the money. Therefore he was able to start his farming.
He had single buggy that he courted Mother in.
How did Grandma Theobald feel about someone so old courting Mother? She seemed really pleased. She went with them to Manti to be married and because Mother was only sixteen years old, had to give her written consent to the marriage.
Father had quite a lot of property in Hinckley. However the ground got water logged. You could dig a hole at night and by morning it would be full of water. Because of this situation, the crops died. Grandfather wanted him to go to Oak City so he sold out in Hinckley and moved to Oak City. It cost too much to drain the land at that time. In later years the ground dried out in a drought and they had to fill the drains that were used to drain the land, with water to be able to grow crops.
We moved to Oak City and Father took over grandfather Talbot's farm.
They were the first ones ever to break ground and clear land for farming north of Oak City. However the rabbits were so bad they had to put wire around the ground to keep them out. This was one of the best Hay fields we ever had. We would get three crops and sometimes four in a summer.
Father was one of the most honest men that ever lived. When he went to borrow money, he would ask what they wanted for security and they would say, "Your word is good enough". Honesty was important to him and he tried to instill that virtue in we children.
We had many good fishing trips with my Father. We would sometimes go to the canyon the night before opening of fishing season, and sleep on the creek bank and listen to the water roll over the rocks all night and could hardly wait till it got light. Quite often Father would say "if we hurry and get this job done, we will go fishing", and the job was soon done and we went up to the canyon fishing.
Father had smoked when he was young, but he said he never wanted his children to see him smoke because he didn't like the habit and knew it wasn't good, so he quit.
He was a very industrious person. He always kept busy and kept we children that way too. Sometimes when it would rain we thought we would get some time off, but we ended up cleaning the stables or something similar.
Father always wanted the best for his children. He wanted to buy land so that his children would have something to start their married life. He loved his children and wanted them to be successful and happy.
He loved the outdoors and liked to fish and to hunt. Most of his boys learned to like these things from being with him.
He knew how to use an awl really well, and used it often cutting posts and hauling wood for himself and others.
Father was a witty man and could hold his own with the best of them. He was with another wise cracker at a dinner table one day, and they were trying to get the best of each other and were talking about eating. The other man said, "You gobble it down like a dog". Father said, "Yes, but I don't belch it up and chew it over like a cow". The man left because he knew he had lost the contest.
He always raised the best potatoes in town and sold them to others. However if there were people in need of them, he just gave them some.
I am glad I had him for a Father. I was glad when he was called to teach the Deacon's Quorum when I was called as secretary.

(Information given by Thomas Reed Talbot - 1989)



Arthur Talbot was born Oct. 24, 1868 in West Jordan, Utah, on the bank of the Jordan River. They lived there some time, then moved down to Leamington, suffering the hardships of pioneering in a new country, putting up with many disadvantages and going without many of the luxuries and conveniences that we have today. He went and worked for $ .50 a day for John Lovell, taking half cash and half store pay for his labor dragging out railroad ties from the canyon. Arthur purchased a small farm in Leamington which he afterwards sold, and purchased a place in Hinckley and started on a farm without either horses, harnesses or wagon. But a very good friend, Bro. William Alldredge (Father of Will Alldredge) came to his rescue and let him have a small team of horses, also a second hand harness on time payments, or pay when he could. It was here at Hinckley that he met his future wife, and was married May 13th, 1892. You can see the results, where we were one, there are 13 children and we have 56 grand ones, 19 great grand ones. We worked very hard to make a livelyhood. We didn’t have a tractor or electric washer until a good share of our family was raised. No bathroom, hot or cold water handy as we have today.

Arthur died May the 29th 1922, the day before Memorial Day, leaving me, his wife, and children, to carry on the work he so earnestly begun. I have done the best I could in my weak way. Not all things are quite as I would like them but perhaps things will turn out better in the future and all will be well.

Given at a family gathering by Clara Elizabeth Theobald Talbot. 
Talbot, Arthur James (I23151)
 
2 Elmo's parents, Jens Peter Alfred Hansen Lund was born in Denmark in 1870 and Julia Anna Christiansen, was born in Ephraim, Utah in 1872. Julia's parent were both born in Denmark. Elmo was the tenth of eleven children; Leo, Le Roy, Caroline, George, Mildred, Novella, Alva, Elvira, Ivan, Elmo, and Ada.

Jens Peter Alfred Hansen Lund (see his life story), commonly called Alfred held a variety of jobs until homesteading some land in Gunnison, Utah as a farmer raising sugar beets and alfalfa. He and Julia were married January 29th, 1892 in Mayfield, Sanpete, Utah. On December 6, 1893 they were sealed in the Salt Lake Temple. Elmo's Grandparents Ramus Hansen Lund and Perrine Jensen settled in Pleasant Grove, Utah, (see their life stories) and Fredrick Christiansen and Elisa Larsen settled in Ephraim, Utah.

The home Alfred and Julia raised their children in was a very small log cabin that barely had room for the family. On warmer nights, the boys slept in the barn. The cabin was located about 12 miles outside of Gunnison. This piece of land later became part of their son Ivan’s farm. Ivan was two years older than Elmo . The original farm was eventually divided between two brothers, Ivan and Alva with a creek separating the two farms when their father no longer farmed. At that time Elmo’s parents moved into a small home in town.

The family was quite poor and most of the children never finished school. His sister Ada told stories of riding into town to school in the winter, when many times, Elmo didn’t have any shoes or a warm jacket. He would arrive at school so cold that the teacher had him sit close to the potbelly stove until he could warm up. Elmo left school around the seventh grade to help on the farm. The entire family was members of the Mormon Church, but their attendance depended on their father; if he was happy about the way things were being done in the ward, the family was all to attend church, but if he was displeased with the Bishop then none of the family was allowed to go to church. Alfred was a very strict father and what he said was the law in the household, no one was allowed to go against it. Being raised that way left only some of their children active in the church.
Elmo’s sister Ada told that their father was not only strict, but on many occasions his actions were very harsh and he didn’t hesitate whipping the boys. For some unknown reason, he never whipped Elmo.

As a young boy Elmo had a horse named Peanuts that he loved very much. One winter he found his horse dead in the mountains, apparently having been killed by a mountain lion.

The family has a picture of Elmo playing basketball with his brother Ivan and a future brother-in-law George Bauer. The uniform had CENTER on their jerseys. Possibly the name of the ward they were living in.

Elmo eventually went to Salt Lake City to find a job, as he didn’t really want to be a farmer. The 1930 Census, when Elmo was 21, shows him living with his sister Mildred and her husband Coy, their new born daughter Dolores, Elmo's sister Elvira and her husband Verl De Mill. Elmo was able to get a job at a gas station in Salt Lake City.

He met his future bride (Ethel) Irene Callister while living with Mildred and Coy. Irene was visiting a friend next door. They would talk over the fence and this led to a courtship and marriage in the Salt Lake Temple on November 28th, 1934. At some point in their marriage he started called Irene “Peanuts”. It was a loving nickname he gave her and it was never used by anyone other than him. Irene gave birth to their first child, Elaine, who was born at St. Mark’s Hospital in Salt Lake City, Utah on April 29, 1936. Sometime after Elaine’s birth there was a robbery at the gas station where Elmo was working and he was knocked unconscious after being hit on the head with a gun.

The young family decided to move to California looking for better employment opportunities. They initially lived with Elmo's sister Ada and her husband George Bauer in Atwater District, California. Atwater lies between the Los Angeles River to the West and Glendale to the north and east. Elmo got a job at a gas station behind the duplex they rented. It was just down the street from where Elmo’s sister Novella and her husband Lyman Sander lived.

Their son, Lynn Elmo, was born at the Glendale Adventist Hospital on May 5, 1939. After Lynn’s birth, Elmo got a job with a Plumbing Company and they moved to the Long Beach area. They only lived there a few months; Irene developed asthma and after a few very bad attacks the doctor told them Irene needed to move to an area that wasn’t so damp. They moved back to Atwater, renting a small house across the street from where Novella and her family lived.

Elmo continued working for the plumbing company, driving a truck that delivered the supplies for their jobs, he eventually started learning the plumbing trade. The owner of the plumbing company was very fond of Elmo, impressed by what a hard worker he was. Knowing that he was a family man he encouraged Elmo to purchase one of the new homes they had done the plumbing for in North Hollywood. He offered to loan him money so they could purchase the house. They paid $5,000 for the house at 5242 Ben Ave., North Hollywood, CA and moved in the summer of 1941. A few years later, they purchased a half a lot next door to their house from his sister Novella Sanders. ------apartments? They lived here until Elmo's death in 1970 and Irene continued to live there until she moved to Rosamond, CA to be closer to her daughter Elaine and husband Bob in 1995 when she could no longer drive and was suffering memory loss.

Although Elmo was not active in the Church most of his life, very few men did more service in their ward and in the neighborhood. Bishop Watts of the Studio City Ward would always call Elmo and some other less active to go the Welfare Farm or to help someone move or to help someone needing some work done. He always said these are the men that I can depend on. When the Studio City Ward building was being built, Max Willard, my Dad and Lynn, a young Deacon did all the plumbing. This meant that Elmo would be there almost every night after work and on Saturdays. Elmo, Max Brenner, Mack, Brownie and Stan Daily worked more hours on the building of the Studio City Ward building than all the other brethren in the ward put together.

If Elmo considered you a friend there wasn’t a thing that he wouldn’t do for you. You knew where you stood with him, he either liked you or he didn’t. Family was very important to him and he taught his children that family would always be there for you. Family and good friends, be loyal and true to them always. He didn’t tell you often that he loved you, but you knew it by his actions and the things that he did for you.

Elmo at some time must have been discouraged with work or his income, telling Irene that he thought they should sell their home and move to Gunnison where he could farm with his brothers, Alva and Ivan. Being a wise supportive wife, Irene suggested that he take a week vacation and they would go to Gunnison so he could farm with his brothers, making sure that was what he wanted to do. Before the week was over Elmo knew that farming wasn’t for him and of how good their life was in California with the job he had at that time.

Unknown to their children, Elmo and Irene struggled some financially. They both took some side jobs to supplement their income. Irene took in ironing and Elmo did a variety of side jobs. He put in yard sprinkler systems (this was before PVC pipes). Elmo would measure and Lynn would cut and thread the pipe then Elmo would put it all together. Of course he and Lynn had to dig the trenches for the sprinklers as well. On the half lot they owned next to their home, Elmo raised rabbits and would butcher, dress and sell to neighbors. He would put the rabbit skin on stretchers and sell them to the feed store. He also had a large vegetable garden that was used for his family and some excess was sold to neighbors. Elmo kept chickens and sold the excess eggs to neighbors as well. Elmo and his son did yard work for neighbors on Saturdays. Included in the yards they did were the Marcy's apartments which covered more than half a block, keeping them very busy on Saturdays. Occasionally they started yards after he got home from work on Fridays as well. Elmo had the best looking yard in the neighborhood including a perfect Dicondra lawn from which you would see him pull any weed that came up. He would be shirtless on his knees pulling weeds almost every night after work.

Elmo and Irene could never afford a new car or even close to a new car. For years they had an old one seat Ford or Chevrolet. Elmo would drive and Elaine would sit in the middle with Irene against the window with Lynn on her lap. This lasted until about 1951 when then bought a 1940 four door Dodge. It had a special light on the top of the front fenders that were used during the War so the light pointed down for blackouts. Years later his sister gave or sold them her Pontiac which they drove for years.

Elmo's knees and neck always seemed to bother him. He had a handheld massager and always worked on his sore knees in the evening. Later it was discovered that it was his hips, eventually leading to hip replacement surgery for both hips. Some of his siblings also had to have hip replacements. He went to the Chiropractor to get an adjustment on his neck that seemed to bother him most of his life.

Elmo loved his family and they were the most important things in his life. He was also a great sports fan. Elmo loved almost all sports and Lynn remembers that on many Saturdays his good friend, Stan Daily and he would watch ice hockey games in their den and eat lunch together. He listened to all the Dodger baseball games and University of Southern California (where Lynn would later attend graduate school) football games and of course watched them on television if the game was televised. Long before the Dodgers came to Los Angeles, Elmo was a big fan of the Los Angeles Angels, a minor league team that was owned by the Chicago Cubs. He would listen to the games on the radio and take his son Lynn to many of the games. Lynn was a big Notre Dame fan (the love for them didn't last long) and he begged Elmo to take him to the game so he could see the great Johnny Lattner play. When they got to the game the tickets were expensive, so Elmo decided he wasn't going to pay. He was about to leave but Lynn was so upset that Elmo gave in and they went to the game. Johnny Lattner won the Heisman Trophy in 1953 and won the Maxwell Award twice, in 1952 and 1953. There wasn't much that Elmo wouldn't do for his two kids. In 1959, while Lynn was attending L.A. Valley College, the Dodgers won the pennant, so Lynn skipped football practice and a scrimmage to drive to L.A. and purchase tickets for him and Elmo. They attended two games and watched the Dodgers defeat the Chicago White Sox for the Championship. It was one of Elmo's fondest moments. The Los Angeles Dodgers moved to Los Angeles in 1958 and played the first few years in the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum. In 1962, they moved to their present home in Chavez Ravine. Elmo probably listened to Dodger games on his little radio from 1958 until his death in 1970.

When his daughter, Elaine, and Bob Thompson started dating and became engaged, Elmo told Bob that he might as well move in and share Lynn’s room since he came right from work every night to help Elmo on the duplex that he was building on the half lot attached to their house by a breeze way. With Bob moving in, he could rent out his home in Sun Valley until he and Elaine got married. This also allowed for him to save money and pay off any of his bills. Bob and Elaine were married .

Elmo was basically very shy, seeming to relate better to kids. When his first grandson, Elaine's son, Bob Thompson was born in 1960, there was nothing Elmo wouldn't do for Bobby. Later, when other grandchildren were born, he wasn't as nice to them as he should be, showing strong favoritism to Bobby. This caused problems and bad feelings for the family.

After graduating from Brigham Young University, Lynn started dating Elaine Eyre whom he noticed while at BYU and later went to her home in Las Vegas to take her on a date. A short time later Elaine moved to West Covina to start teaching. They dated until he went into the Army for six months. After finishing basic training at Fort Ord, CA, Lynn came home for several weeks before finishing his six months at Fort Gordon, Georgia. Lynn wanted to buy something for Elaine as a reminder of him while he was gone. He was concerned because Elaine was writing to an LDS missionary in France who would be coming home while he was in Georgia. Elmo said why don't you just ask her to marry you and give her an engagement ring. Elmo and Irene had become quite fond of Elaine on her visits and they had taken her with them to see Lynn at Fort Ord. Lynn listened to Elmo's advice, and became engaged in December of 1962. They were married in the Los Angeles temple on July 6, 1963.

Elmo eventually went to work for the Southern Pacific Railroad as a pipefitter and worked there until he developed lung cancer. Early in 1970 he wasn’t feeling well and went to see the Southern Pacific doctors. After being examined by their doctors he was sent to their hospital in San Francisco. After spending some time in the hospital his son Lynn convinced Irene and his sister Elaine that the three of them needed to go to San Francisco and visit him. They needed to know what the doctors had decided was wrong with him and they weren’t getting any answers from Elmo. They visited him and he told them the doctor wanted to see them. They were then told by the doctor that he had lung cancer and that it was terminal. The cancer was too advanced for surgery or any treatment other than to keep him comfortable and to drain the fluid as the lung filled. The doctor told us that he was glad that we had come since Elmo didn’t want to be the one to tell us, he wanted the doctor to do it. Elmo's family was shocked. Elmo had told them the doctors wanted him to go to the hospital to check to see if he had TB. They were so upset that Lynn suggested they drive to the Oakland Temple and walked around the grounds until they were calm and ready to talk to Elmo more about what the doctor had told them. They offered a prayer for his recovery and to help them stay strong for him. They stayed there at least one night and returned home. A month later Elaine and her husband Bob (Leonard Robert Thompson) decided to drive up to see him, taking their older four children (Bobby, Ric, Lisa and Ron) with them to cheer him up.

Elmo was sent home over the Christmas holidays to spend time with his family with the knowledge that he would need to be back to the hospital right after New Year’s. The doctors were trying to figure out the origin of the cancer, wanting to check the thyroid, but never getting the chance. The cancer might have come from the fact that Elmo smoked cigarettes, a pipe and cigar for many years. When his oldest grandson Bob was about three years old he told his grandfather that he didn’t want him to smoke or to drink coffee anymore. That’s all it took and Elmo quit smoking and drinking coffee. He hadn’t been active in church while his children were growing up, but when his grandson told him that he needed to go to church, he started attending with Irene. By the time Bob turned eight, Elmo was worthy and baptized him. Elmo had recently had a hip replacement, so his son in-law, Bob, helped him down into the font and was there to steady him. It was a very emotional moment for his family as he had never given his children a blessing and they had never heard him pray. It took the courage of a grandson to tell him what he should do when his own children hadn’t felt they could, they loved their dad so much and didn’t want him to get mad at them. At some time before the baptism, he started wearing his Temple garments.

On New Year's Eve, December 31, 1970, while sitting in his recliner in their family room he had a heart attack and died. The family has always felt that he willed himself to die there at home as he didn’t want to go back to the hospital and be so far away from his family and friends.

Bob and Elaine had gone out for the evening to celebrate the New Year and when they arrived home their dear neighbor, Celesta West, was standing in their driveway waiting to tell Elaine about the death of her father. Celesta felt that it would be easier for her to give them the news than their young babysitter, Steve Nielsen. Lynn and his wife Elaine (nee Eyre) (same first name as his sister) and their young son (Roger) were in Las Vegas visiting Elaine's parents for New Year’s when they got the call, from the daughter of the Davidsons across the street, with the news of Elmo's passing. It was Elaine's mom that suggested they all knee and Grandpa Eyre offered a prayer. Lynn and his family then returned to California the next day.



 
Lund, Elmo Hansen (I4977)
 
3 Lisle Hixson was born April 10, 1899 in a rock house in Wanship, Utah. When she was three years old she moved to Park City where her father worked in the mines, mining for silver, lead and zinc.
The family then moved to State Line, Nevada to work in the mines or the mill there. It was a gold mining town near Cedar City, Utah. They then moved to Salt Lake City where Lisle’s father was a street car conductor. He retired from that job.
Her mother died after they moved to Salt Lake and she took care of her younger brother and her father. She worked in the Utah Woolen Mills store as she grew up. She lived on 4th Ave. and C St. which is near the LDS Hospital. She married Fred Landeen on the 20th of June, 1923 in the Salt Lake Temple.
Her husband was a carpenter and he came to the United States in 1900 from Sweden. Lisle became acquainted with many of the Swedes of the area.
The family moved to Rock Springs, Wyoming in the spring of 1928. It took 5 hours to make the trip of 200 miles from Salt Lake to Rock Springs.
In Rock Springs she became acquainted with many different nationalities and learned many of their ways, especially cooking. Some of her descendants still enjoy recipes she acquired, such as Swedish pancakes, Italian chicken, cabbage rolls, Poteetsas, Swedish Butter Cookies, etc.
She was involved in sewing clubs, and judged county fairs in quilting and other handwork. She was Relief Society President for many years. She did a lot of catering for weddings and other social events. She also gave book reviews to many organizations. She always went on fishing trips with the family, and while they fished, she crocheted. She loved the outdoors and loved to go on car rides to see the countryside. She learned to drive in Salt Lake but when she moved to Rock Springs, she was not allowed to drive again.
Her children consisted of five boys and one girl. She had many Hawaiian friends in her home while growing up and was able to go to the islands to visit them and enjoyed that very much.
She was a widow for many years but made a good life for herself. She fell and broke her ankle which necessitated her moving to Sandy, Utah where she lived the remainder of her years. She wanted to live to the year 2000 so she could say she lived in three centuries. She didn’t make it. She died in 1996 at the age of 97. She started life in the horse and buggy era and lived to see the rocket and computer era of our day.
(Written by Dick Landeen, September 1, 1998)



Obituary: Lisle H. Landeen, 97, died at about 3:30 p.m. Thursday, July 25, 1996 at the Sandy Regional Convalescent Center (90th South 50 East, Sandy, Utah), where she had been a resident. A resident of Sandy, Utah and former longtime resident of Rock Springs. Mrs. Landeen died following a lengthy illness.

Born April 10, 1899, at Wanship, Utah to Vantyle Mack Hixson and Mary Edith King.In growing up, she has lived in Wanship, Stateline, Park City and Salt Lake City. In Salt Lake City, she lived up on 4th Avenue "C" Street.

She was married to Fred Landeen on June 28, 1923, in the Salt Lake Temple. They lived out in East Millcreek on 33rd South and 23rd East.

Their first three children were born at this residence and then, in 1928, they moved to Rock Springs, Wyoming and lived at 1143 Vermont Street until 1937, when they moved into their own home at 422 "P" Street.

She has been active in the LDS Church all her life and has held many positions in the auxiliary organizations.

She has belonged to a sewing club, participated in quilting projects, and has been active in community doings. For many years she gave book reviews to various clubs and organizations.

With the help of Mrs. Fae Grove, she ran a successful catering service for all kinds of celebrations. She became well known in the community for her miniature open-face sandwiches.

In the span of her lifetime, she was born in the horse and buggy era, and lived to see the space age come upon us.

In 1987, she sold her home at 422 "P" Street and moved to a retirement community in Sandy, Utah.

In late August of 1990, she returned to Wyoming and has been living at Castlerock Convalescent Center in Green River. In January 1992, she returned to Utah to live at the Sandy Regional Convalescent Center.

Her husband preceded her in death in January of 1969.

She had four brother, of which Sterling K. Hixson, of Bountiful, Utah is the last surviving member of her family. In addition to her parents and husband, Mrs. Landeen was preceded in death by three brothers and one grandchild, Ted Landeen.

Her immediate family consists of five sons and one daughter, all living; they are Dr. Fred H. of Tucson, Ariz.; Robert D. of Rock Springs ; G. Richard of Draper, Utah; Karin Landeen of Thomson, Georgia; Dr. Donald V. of Tucson, Ariz.; and Dr. James M. of San Antonio, Texas.

She is survived by 4 daughters-in-law, and many nephews, nieces, grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

Funeral services will be conducted at 11 a.m., Tuesday, July 30, 1996 at the LDS Stake Center, 2055 Edgar Street, Rock Springs. Bishop Allen Knight will conduct the services. Interment will be in the family plot in Rest Haven Memorial Gardens, north of Rock Springs. Friends may call at the Vase Funeral Chapel in Rock Springs, Monday afternoon and evening until 8 p.m. and Tuesday morning at the LDS Stake Center, one hour prior to the services.

 
Hixson, Lisle (I4666)
 
4

AFN: Merged with a record that used the AFN 40M5-V8 
Butterworth, Sara (I6864)
 
5

BIRTH: Also shown as Born 30 Jul 1616 
Stanton, Thomas (I99352)
 
6

BIRTH: Also shown as Born Cal 1581 
Olsdatter (I49557)
 
7

BIRTH: Also shown as Born Tårnby, Tårnby, Hovedstaden, Denmark. 
Diderichsdatter, Sidse (I38691)
 
8

GIVEN NAMES: Also shown as Jep 
Hansen, Jeppe (I550)
 
9
William Clayton Partridge was born October 2, 1862 at Farmington Davis County, Utah, to Edward Partridge Jr. and Sarah Lucretia Clayton. He was the third child born in a family of eight children. He was, as I have heard say, just a rough and ready Mormon boy. He was called to fill a mission to the Hawaiian Islands when he was still in his teens. His father before him had served as the President of this mission. His testimony of the gospel was indeed strengthened and grew during these years. He used to tell of these wonderful experiences, and vivid answers to his fervent prayers. I remember he and his wife, Sarah Jane Stott, kept a coconut on the floor by the front door of their home in Cowley, Wyoming, a keepsake from his missionary years in Hawaii.
He answered a call to colonize the Big Horn basin in Wyoming in the year 1900. Taking his wife, Sarah Jane Stott, and his three children, he settled in Cowley and became it’s first bishop. Later he became the President of the stake and in later life was very active in genealogical work.
He passed away May 3 1938 at the age of 76. William was a very industrious man and desired to be in debt to no man. At his death he had no debts. He felt that it was dearer to borrow by far than to buy. He said at one time that it wasn’t where we were buried that counted but how we lived. Also that it wasn’t so much how proud we were of our ancestors but how proud they would be of us; that each of us owed it to the family name to make it a good name. He worked very hard and made a good living and home for his family and was revered by all who knew him.
Note: The above account was written by my mother, Geniel Lillie Jacobson Partridge. Grandpa passed away before I was born. I remember mother often telling me stories of Grandpa W. C. Partridge and how very kind he was to her as a daughter-in-law. I heard that he had a great sense of humor and dry wit. She loved and respected him highly. 
Partridge, William Clayton (I19786)
 
10 Thero Eames Tippets, son of Arthur and Sarah Eames Tippets, was born on April 25, 1911 in Preston, Idaho. He had three brothers and one sister.
In 1912, Thero’s family moved to Driggs, Idaho where his father, Arthur opened a hardware store. There Thero spent his days growing into a young man. He went through school in Driggs, Idaho. He played in the pep band and on the basketball team.
In his teenage years, Thero became very interested in scouting. He used to spend many weekends out camping and hiking.
Thero spent time working with his father in the hardware store. However, during the depression of 1929, the hardware store went broke, and so Arthur closed his store and moved his family from Driggs, Idaho to Pocatello, Idaho. Thero was a senior in high school at that time, and had just been elected Student Body President, so he stayed in Driggs to finish school. He graduated with honors. He was awarded a scholarship to Ricks College, but decided to go to college in Pocatello because he could live at home for free.
When Thero turned 19, he worked for the Forest Service and built trails all over the Teton Mountains. One summer he worked on the beetle infestation which included a group of fellows climbing the mountain and marking the trees that needed to be cut down. Another group would follow close behind, spray kerosene on the downed trees, and then burn them.
While in college, Thero took an active part in the seminary program, and also was on the Stake Board for Mutual. He attended college for 3 years and studied business and school teaching. He also played the trumpet in the college band and orchestra and participated in lots of school plays. While in college, he worked for Safeway Stores, and was transferred to Idaho Falls in the summer of 1937 to work for them.
He was married to Ruth Ida Ruchti on November 8, 1937 in the Salt Lake City Temple and then moved to Idaho Falls to live. They bought their first home on 315 7th Street in the spring of 1938 and lived there until he died.
In November of 1942, Thero entered the army. He trained in the U.S. for year and then went to Europe. He was a part of the 92nd Signal Corps of General Patton’s 3rd Army group. He had 5 battle stars, and ended the war at Hitler’s Buthargarden. He spent 3 years to the day in the army. While in the army, Ruth gave birth on July 25, 1944 to their first child, Thero Richard Tippets.
When Thero came home from the army, he went back to work in the grocery business. He later worked at Ashton’s Glass & Paint Company until he retired. Following retirement, he spent much of his time following, researching and investing in the stock market.
Thero and his son Richard built a cabin up in Island Park and spent many weekends up there fishing, boating, and enjoying the outdoors.
He had a strong testimony of the truthfulness of The Church of Jesus Christ Of Latter-day Saints. He was an active member of the church and served as a High Priest’s secretary, home teacher, and in the MIA and Scouting programs.
Thero died December 6, 1980 in Idaho Falls at the hospital following a stroke. He was 69 years old. At the time of his death, he was survived by his wife Ruth, 2 children, and 5 grandchildren.

Added by his grandson, Jared Tippets (Son of Richard). I got this life history in 2002 from some old records I found at my parents. 
Tippets, Thero Eames "Tip" (I392)
 
11 ARABELLA ANN CHANDLER was born February 27, 1824, in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, England, the fourth child of George Chandler and Esther Glover. The family group sheets give her name as Arabella, though in her history her children George and Caroline call her “Arabell Ann,” so maybe that’s how she pronounced her name. Arabella’s parents had thirteen children, of which seven died in childhood. George and Caroline describe their grandparents this way:
“George Chandler was an unusual character, being high-minded, strict in his habits, exacting in his discipline, and immaculate in his dress and personal appearance. Everything about him, both in private and in public, must conform to his social ambition. He would not recognize his own children until they were up to his standard in personal appearance.
“. . . Esther Glover, was of modest disposition, highly refined, naturally artistic, scrupulously clean, and possessed of unusual executive ability. Arabell Ann inherited these characteristics from her parents.”
The Chandlers went to church and read the Bible in the home. Arabella’s family was prosperous. She went to school, studied literature, and spent a lot of time horse back riding. But then her father suffered a financial reversal. Much of their property was tied up in litigation and was never recovered. Arabella learned dress-making and millinery (women’s hat making) to help support the family. George died in 1839, when Arabella was about 15. Before long, Arabella was supporting her mother and brother Frederick, who was only 5 when their father died.
In 1842, Esther, Arabella, and Frederick were baptized into The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints. Arabella was 18 at the time. Arabella did missionary work by distributing tracts door-to-door in Cheltenham. In 1849, when Arabella was 25, her mother died. Arabella’s sister Clarissa and her husband John Alder, a member of the Church since 1842, emigrated to St. Louis in 1850.1 Arabella saved her money and earned enough for her and Frederick to follow them in 1851. They sailed with a company of Saints on the George W. Bourne to New Orleans and then by riverboat to St. Louis. Arabella worked at dressmaking and millinery to try to earn enough money to continue on to Zion. She met a recent convert, Samuel Rose Parkinson, also English, and married him on January 1, 1852. She was 27 at the time, and he just 20.
Samuel was doing well as a drayman (someone who hauls things for a living), owned his teams, and had money in the bank. Their first child, Samuel Chandler, was born February 23, 1853. The Parkinsons left their home and business in 1854 to come to Utah, bringing Frederick as well as Samuel’s little sister Lucy with them. Arabella had to cook over buffalo chips, and once they saw a buffalo stampede. They encountered Indians, including a party of 350 fresh from raiding, whom the pioneers fed and gave gifts. The Parkinsons and their company narrowly escaped a massacre at Fort Laramie.
Arabella and Samuel moved first to Kaysville. Samuel built her a log house with a dirt roof and a dirt floor. On August 1, 1855, she had a girl, Charlotte, and the next day, August 2, Charlotte’s twin brother, William. Arabella was in bed with them when a storm blew a part of the roof off the house, drenching mother and babies with rain and mud, but they pulled through. Samuel gardened, raised stock, ran a threshing machine, and worked on the fort. Arabella kept house and sewed for her family and for hire. Their son George was born July 18, 1857. Samuel was called up in the Utah War and spent much of that winter on guard duty in the cliffs in Echo Canyon. On July 7, 1859, they had another son, Franklin. Arabella’s brother Frederick got restless in Utah and, contrary to the counsel of Brigham Young, left for California to look for gold. He wrote for a while but then stopped, and though they tried to find him and reestablish contact, they never could. Arabella sorrowed over him as long as she lived.
In the spring of 1860, the Parkinsons joined 12 other families who moved to Cache Valley and settled along the Muddy River. They called their village Green Meadows. When President Brigham Young visited in July to organize the ward, he asked them to change the name of the river to Cub Creek and the name of the town to Franklin, after Apostle Franklin D. Richards, and they obliged. For the first few years they thought they were in Utah, but when the surveys came through, Franklin proved to be the oldest town in Idaho. Samuel farmed, hauled goods to Montana, and started a store in their house. Arabella made soap, molded candles, cured meat, made the buckskin shirts and trousers that her husband and sons wore, wove the linsey-woolsey cloth (a course mixture of wool and linen or cotton) and sewed the dresses that she and her daughters wore. Often she used horsehair for thread.
Samuel worked on ditches, helped build the school, and served as constable and as a minuteman-they rode out in response to Indian raids every year. Arabella was tending store one day when an Indian man came in and threatened to kill her if she didn’t give him liquor. She kept cool and ordered him from the store, and he obeyed. Arabella’s and Samuel’s second daughter, Esther, was born February 2, 1862.
In 1863 the U.S. Army attacked the Shoshoni on Bear River, 12 miles north of Franklin, killing many hundreds of men, women, and children. The Mormons helped care for the survivors on both sides. Arabella and Samuel took in a Shoshoni boy who survived the massacre and raised him, giving him the name of Shem Parkinson. Shem was by some accounts an angry boy, hard for Arabella to handle, and even pulled a knife on Samuel once. But he joined the Church and became a deacon. He died of quick consumption in 1881. Arabella’s son Albert was born
Arabella during her trip to St. Louis, 1879 consumption in 1881. Arabella’s son Albert was born August 8, 1863 but died at 9 months. Arabella’s children write: “This caused her great sorrow. However, there were so many responsibilities crowding on her that she was forced to dismiss her sorrow as much as possible to carry out her duties.” Clara was born April 18, 1865 and Caroline November 10, 1866, making five boys and four girls born to Samuel and Arabella.
Samuel was doing well now at farming, freighting, and managing the store. According to his daughter Vivian, Samuel and Arabella discussed plural marriage even before they married. Samuel told Arabella: “You know, I know that’s true, that church. And if I join it I’m going to join it whole hand or none. And that means if there ever comes a time I think I should take another wife, I’m going to do it. So now you make up your mind because that’s what I’m going to do.
” After getting Arabella’s consent, Samuel made cautious inquiries about marrying Charlotte Smart, the daughter of his friend and business partner Thomas S. Smart. Charlotte was willing but on her father’s advice told Samuel to wait a year. She also asked him not to court her during that time, out of consideration for Arabella. They talked only briefly at Church functions, danced at parties, and were rarely if ever alone. Samuel married Charlotte in 1866. He was 35 and Charlotte 17.
Arabella, age 42, had given birth to Caroline, her youngest, just a month before. Samuel married Charlotte’s sister Maria two years later, when Maria was also 17. According to George and Caroline, Arabella lived the law of Sarah: “She knew by the revelation from God that her domestic life for time and all eternity was involved in . . . the celestial order of marriage, and upon this conviction she stepped forth and gave her husband these two wives to become the mothers of his children.” Charlotte tended Arabella’s children so Arabella could be present at Maria’s wedding.
Samuel rotated between wives, a week at each. Arabella had a house, and Charlotte and Maria lived for years in separate rooms in another one. Between the three families Samuel eventually had 32 children. The various histories depict Samuel’s homes as happy and say all three wives were peacemakers and devoted to their families. Arabella’s children were having children at the same time as the other wives, which must have meant Samuel’s two younger families got an extra portion of his attention. He had other demands that kept him away as well. He became the manager of the Franklin Co-op, which included a woolen mill and other undertakings besides the store.
He served as a counselor in the same bishopric for 30 years, which they figured was a record. In 1873 the Church sent him on an exploration mission to Arizona. He went to prison for polygamy for five months in 1886. Arabella asked if she could send a bed with him, and the marshal said no, just a quilt and pillow. So she made him a quilt with eight pounds of wool. She sent him care packages with cakes, candies, and fruit. She kept the family going and looked over his financial affairs while he was gone.




Arabella was thin, of medium height, with brown, wavy hair and brown eyes. Her children write that “her integrity was unimpeachable and that she was trustworthy in all her social and business transactions in life and has carefully trained her children in habits of industry, economy and strict morality. . . . She could endure long hours and was extremely patient and kind. She rather shunned public notoriety. She was very sensitive in the care of her husband especially when he was suffering with severe headaches.” They note: “She seldom gave a distinct order or made a rule. Her children learned from early infancy, from her attitude of mind, that if a thing were right it must be done and there ceased to be a question about it.”
Arabella made one trip East that we know of, to St. Louis in 1879, 25 years after leaving. Samuel needed to buy equipment for the woolen mill, and Arabella accompanied him. They visited Samuel’s stepfather and brothers and sisters and Arabella’s sister Clarissa.
Samuel built Arabella a large new house in Franklin, and when he got out of prison for polygamy, she had the idea of having a party for all the old folks in town. They issued invitations to all over 60, “regardless of creed or color,” as well as missionary wives, widows, and orphans. The party was such a success they decided to hold them every year. Samuel held weekly “home nights” for his three families and once a month at Arabella’s for all the families. (This was years before the Church adopted the family home evening program.) They’d visit, talk about family problems, have treats, and entertain.
As the kids left home, the three families began gathering for an annual reunion at Arabella’s. Samuel used to call them “heaven on earth.” One of Arabella’s last requests was that the family keep her home when she died as a gathering place for the annual reunions.
Arabella developed cataracts as she aged, so her sister-wife Charlotte would send her boys up to get her wood, and her girls to help with her cleaning. She died August 9, 1894. The doctor said she had no disease but that her vital organs had worn out. Samuel died 25 years later at age 88 in 1919.

Notes
1. Clarissa Chandler Alder may have been a member at this time also. We know she was baptized in 1882, but members were often rebaptized as a way to renew their covenants. John Alder died in 1852 in St. Louis. Clarissa then married Thomas Binnington.

Histories

1. George C. Parkinson and Caroline C. P. Goaslind, “Biography of Arabell Ann Chandler Parkinson.” A very adulatory history written by two of Arabella’s children. My history is largely an abridgment of this one. I have seen this history in at least two versions. One includes family data from a 1935 family reunion. Another brings it forward to 1947 and adds her physical description, etc., but omits important details from the earlier version.

2. William H. Smart, “Arabella Ann Chandler Parkinson," obituary, Deseret Evening News, 23 Aug. 1894. This is not as detailed but does give the important fact of Arabella’s tracting in Cheltenham.

3. Benson Y. Parkinson, “Samuel Rose Parkinson (1831-1919)” (Oct 2002). A companion piece to this-numerous details of Arabella and Samuel’s life together. See also sources listed there.

4. Preston Woolley Parkinson, The Family of Samuel Rose Parkinson (2001). Preston is a grandson. His treatment of Samuel includes many details of Arabella’s life.

5. Lydia Dunford Alder, “Reminiscences of the Pioneers of 1854”; Improvement Era, July 1908, 708-13; “The Massacre at Fort Laramie,” Improvement Era, June 1909, 636-38. Lydia married George Alder, Arabella’s sister Clarissa’s son. These articles give several of Samuel and Arabella’s experiences crossing the plains.

6. Thomas Ambrose Poulter, in Utah Pioneer Biographies (1964), 44:139-41, available at the Family History Library. More pioneer experiences by a trail mate.

7. Samuel Rose Parkinson, Founders’ Day Speech (1911), in Lester P. Taylor, Samuel Rose Parkinson: Portrait of a Pioneer [1977], 77-79. Details of early life in Franklin.


Biography by her son George C Parkinson and her daughter Caroline C Parkinson Goaslind
Arabell Ann Chandler Parkinson, the daughter of George Chandler and Esther Glover, was born February 27, 1824, at Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, England. Her parents were of the substantial middle class. While they may not be classed among the aristocracy, they were highly refined, well educated, honest, industrious and thrifty.

They were the parents of thirteen children, seven of whom died in infancy. The other six on record are as follows: Caroline Matilda, Clarissa, Arabell Ann, Emily Sarah, Margaret Eliza and Frederick.

George Chandler was an unusual character, being high-minded, strict in his habits, exacting in his discipline, and immaculate in his dress and personal appearance. Everything about him, both in private and in public, must conform to his social ambition. He would not recognize his own children until they were up to his standard in personal appearance.

Her mother, Esther Glover, was of modest disposition, highly refined, naturally artistic, scrupulously clean, and possessed of unusual executive ability. Arabell Ann inherited these characteristics from her parents.

The education they received consisted of their home environment, along with the school advantages in their locality at that time.

She was naturally artistic and original, a student of literature, humorous and kept up with her social surroundings. As was the customary sport at that time, she indulged in horseback riding and became quite expert.

Because of their industry and thrift, the family became prosperous and was considered among the well-to-do class. However, they were overtaken with misfortune and lost their property, part of which, if not all, went into chancery and was never recovered. The family was therefore forced to live by strict economy and industry. It was during this period that Arabell learned the art of dressmaking and millinery, and by this means she rendered valuable assistance to the family.

The family were Christian people and associated with the Protestants of their time. They read the scriptures and believed in Jesus Christ.

Under this influence the subject of this sketch grew to womanhood.

In 1839 her father died. Soon after his death, her two sisters married. Caroline married a man by the name of Ghent and moved to London. Clarissa married John Alder.

We have no information as to what became of the other two sisters. We do know however that Arabell proved to be the main support of her widowed mother and her brother Frederick. It was during this experience that they became acquainted with the "Mormon" missionaries. In 1842, she, her mother and her brother Frederick joined the church and became active members in spreading the tidings they so joyfully received.

In 1849 her mother died and her little brother Frederick was left to her sole care and protection. In the meantime, her sister Clarissa and her husband, John Alder, joined the Church and emigrated to St. Louis in 1850.

Arabell struggled on. Through her industry she was able to maintain herself and her brother and to save means so that in 1851, they were able to emigrate to St. Louis. They left Liverpool January 9, 1851, on the steamship "George W. Hourne." This company was in charge of William Gibson, Thomas Margetts and William Booth. They arrived in New Orleans and were taken by riverboat up to St. Louis. Here she engaged in her profession as dressmaker and milliner in an effort to acquire the necessary means to continue their journey to Utah.

It was here that she made the acquaintance of Samuel Rose Parkinson. After a brief courtship they were married on January 1, 1852. They remained in St. Louis until after the birth of their first child, Samuel C. Parkinson, who was born February 23, 1853.

They continued to accumulate means with which to pay their way across the plains, and, early in the spring of 1854, they joined the St. Louis company. His sister Lucy and her brother Frederick accompanied them on this journey. Most of the company had oxen, but he was among the few who had a mule team.

Trip Across the Plains

Notwithstanding their effort and care in arranging for this journey, it required almost super-human courage and determination to face the enterprise, and, above all, it required faith in God. Each day brought forth new difficulties to be overcome, not only the desert and the wilderness but also the wild beasts and the savage Indians.

On their way, they encountered herds of wild buffalo, and at one time witnessed a stampede among them. Her husband went on several buffalo hunts. While riding on one occasion, he killed a buffalo and the meat was used for food. No doubt many of the children and grand children can remember her husband, in after years, taking them on his knee and telling them the story of the buffalo hunt and then singing to them the song, "We'll Chase the Buffalo."

She performed her full share of camp duties by caring for her child, then a year old, and her brother who was but a lad. We have no record of any sensational experiences.

The company traveled on from day to day until they reached Salt Lake City some time in October, 1884. Here the company was disorganized and each family determined on its own location. They chose to locate at Kaysward, where a few of the Saints had settled. Here they began building a new home under pioneer circumstances. Her first home was a one-room log hut with a dirt floor and dirt roof. It was very hastily built because of the lateness of the season, with little or no regard for household conveniences.

Winter was soon upon them. As there had been no time in which to provide food for the animals, they had great difficulty in securing food for the winter. Her husband would often take the grass from under the snow on the side hills, bring it home in sacks and feed it to the animals, thus saving their lives.

With her usual tact, Arabell fixed up her little home with conveniences available. Thus they spent the winter.

In August, 1885, she gave birth to twin babies. She named them William and Charlotte after her husband's father and mother. While she was in bed with these babies, they experienced one of those terrific east winds which blew the rood partially off immediately above her bed, allowing the rain and wind to come in on her. Not only her life but the lives of her children were endangered, but by the providence of God, they were saved.

Her husband, became a leader in the development of the ward and its surroundings. The chief means of support was derived from gardening, farming and stock-raising. She did the sewing for her own family and for others, besides taking care of her household duties. Thus they managed to live for the next five years, during which time two more children were born: George in 1857 and Frank in 1859.

Her husband was one of the minute men during the Johnson's army experience in 1857, and was also one of the rescue party of the Salmon river missionaries, which of course took him away from home a great deal of the time.

Her brother Frederick, now about 20 Years of age, became dissatisfied with his future prospects, and, because of the gold excitement in California decided to go there and seek his fortune. For some time he kept in touch with her by letter, but finally ceased to write and was never heard from again. Every effort was made to discover his whereabouts, but without avail. This was one of the greatest sorrows that ever came into her life, which sorrow lingered with he as long as she lived.

Move to Franklin

In 1858 there was considerable speculation as to the advantages in Cache Valley. Her husband decided to make a trip to investigate. He was impressed with the locality and decided to locate at a place afterward known as Franklin. He made some slight improvement to establish a "squatter's" claim and then returned to Kaysward (Kaysville) and spent the winter.

In the early spring of 1858, they gathered together all of their belongings and made their way to Cache Valley, and they with twelve other families, located where Franklin now stands, on April 13, 1860. This was then supposed to be in Utah, but was afterward known to be the first white settlement in the State of Idaho.

These thirteen families lived in their wagon boxes for several months, and meanwhile built their log houses in formation to protect themselves against the Indians.

They immediately began their gardening and farming in preparation for the coming winter. During the summer they built the school house which they used for public worship as well as for school. This was the first school house built in Idaho.

While her husband was engaged in the outside responsibilities, she was busily engaged in the care of her children, for she did all of their sewing by hand and often used horse hair for thread. He meals were prepared with the most primitive utensils and bare necessities of food. She manufactured the soap, moulded the candles and cured the meat.

Because of additional immigration the settlement made rapid progress and was soon organized into a ward.

In the year 1862, her daughter Esther was born, and, in the meantime, her husband began the operation of a small store. He handled such commodities as the community needed, using part of their home for the store. She, with her many other duties, assisted in caring for the store.

On one occasion, while thus engaged, an Indian entered the store and demanded some liquor, threatening her life if she refused to give it to him. With a calm presence of mind and great courage she ordered him from the store thus averting what might have been a tragedy.

War at Battle Creek

In 1868, the government troops made war upon the Indians at Battle Creek, on Bear River, 12 miles north of Franklin. Most of the adult Indians were killed in the battle, leaving a great many children alive. These Indian children were distributed among the white settlers. An Indian boy whom Arabell took to raise, they named Shem. He was of a savage, suspicious nature and was very difficult to manage. This added much to her responsibility.

During this year her son Albert was born. He lived only nine months. This caused her great sorrow. However, there were so many responsibilities crowding on her that she was forced to dismiss her sorrow as much as possible in order to carry on her duties.

In 1865 her daughter was born. In 1866 her ninth child, Caroline, was born. This made a family of five boys and four girls, and one Indian boy they raised from childhood. This of course meant great industry and good management.

Plural Marriage

We approach this phase of her life with a desire to do full justice to all concerned. Plural marriage was a tenet of her faith and then all worthy men were required to accept and obey this law. Her husband, also a firm believer, felt it was his duty to obey this law. In 1865 he married Charlotte Smart and in 1867 he married her sister Maria Smart.

It required supreme faith and confidence in God to undergo this experience. She knew by the revelation from God that her domestic life for time and all eternity was involved in this order of the priesthood, or the celestial order of marriage, and upon this conviction she stepped forth and gave to her husband those two wives to become the mothers of his children.

She did not court notoriety but was content to live a domestic life in her own home. She believed in doing right for the love of right and not through fear of punishment, and she instilled this principle into her children.

In her there was an atmosphere of goodness. She seldom gave a distinct order or made a rule. Her children learned from early infancy, from her attitude of mind, that if a thing were right it must be done and there ceased to be a question about it. By this course of life, she commanded the respect of the three families and of all who made her acquaintance. She was honest, just and charitable, and in the promotion of these characteristics it was truthfully said of her at her death, "She was the peace-maker," thus exemplifying the instructions of our Savior, "Blessed is the Peace-Maker."

As would be expected, when these new members were added to the family more house room became a necessity and these were provided as fast as circumstances would permit. The conveniences and house environments were kept abreast of the other families in the community.

The children were taught to be industrious and self-supporting. They were believers and promoters of education and as they obtained all the education afforded locally the children were sent to more advanced schools for higher education. The four boys filled foreign missions and the girls became efficient as schoolteachers and homemakers.

Arabell's husband was the leading merchant and was a successful businessman. He was a member of the bishopric of the ward and in keeping with the growth of the settlement he built a spacious new home and here she entertained her many friends among whom were many of the general authorities. At the time the raid was being made on the polygamist families her husband was arrested and served six months in the Boise penitentiary for this offense and paid a three hundred dollar fine.

It was Arabell who conceived the idea of providing some social pleasure for the aged and unfortunate and to this end it was decided to have such a gathering in her new home. Invitations were sent out to all over sixty years of age and to the widows and the orphans. This was regardless of creed or color. She provided refreshments and a program was arranged. This gathering was a pronounced success and many expressed appreciation and good will. Because of the success it was decided to make it an annual occasion and was so continued for the rest of her life. It was out of this that the idea of family gatherings was introduced. She sponsored the idea and among her last requests was one that her home be kept as a family gathering place for the family reunions. A number of years before her death a family organization was effected and reunions of the three families were held once a year in the home. These reunions were very successfully carried out and were enjoyed by all. She was liberal with her contributions and when the Relief Society of the church adopted the policy of storing wheat she became a strong advocate of the move and was very strict in paying her allotment. Hers was a strenuous life. She is now approaching the end. Let us review in brief some of her rich experiences.

She had a family of nine children, thirty-four grand children and one great grand child. From the time she joined the Church in England until the time of her death she has been a leading figure in the pioneer experiences of the Church. Without the least show of vanity we can truly say of her that her integrity was unimpeachable and that she was trustworthy in all her social and business transactions in life and has carefully trained her children in habits of industry, economy and strict morality. She has given to them the best facilities for education that the country in her day afforded.

After an illness of nine days duration she passed peacefully away on August 9, 1894. She was a true wife and a loving mother, a safe and wise counselor and lived to see the fruits of her maternal labors in that her children are all faithful Latter-day Saints and are respected members of society. She had a firm testimony of the gospel and the highest aim and ambition of her life was to observe its teachings and to establish an example that her children might emulate.

Among her last admonitions to her family was to be united and to perpetuate the sentiments of love and family reunion in their homes. On April 6, 1935 there were eighty-five of her descendants met in her honor at the 20th Ward Relief Society Hall in Salt Lake City. A suitable program was given and refreshments served. On this date her descendants numbered as follows: nine children, 66 grand-children, 167 great grandchildren, 55 great great grandchildren and 87 in-laws. Total 382.

At the family reunion held July 21, 1947 her descendants numbered as follows:

Children 9
Grand Children 68
Great Grand children 184
Great Great Grand children 175
Great Great Great Grand children 18

Total 454
In-laws 144
---------------
598

An account of the descendants of Samuel Rose Parkinson, July 21, 1947.

Descendants In-laws
Arabell Ann Chandler Parkinson 454 144
Charlotte Smart Parkinson 280 79
Maria Smart Parkinson 204 76
----------------
938 299

Grand total 1237

Description and Other Details

Arabell was of slight build, medium height, fair complexion with brown curly hair and brown eyes. She was easy to become acquainted with and an interesting conversationalist. She was a splendid cook, a good economist and executive. She was not robust but wiry and active, could endure long hours and was extremely patient and kind. She rather shunned public notoriety. She was very sensitive to the care of her husband especially when he was suffering with severe headaches. When her husband was sentenced to prison at Boise, Idaho for his religious belief, she asked the officers if she might send a good bed with him. The answer was: "No. You may send one quilt and one pillow." She manifested her thoughtful devotion by providing an unusual quilt, having eight pounds of wool in it, also sent a nice soft pillow and would also send a box of fresh fruits, cake, candies, etc. occasionally.

In his absence she looked to the care of his numerous family and guarded carefully his financial interests. She had good health up to the time of her death. The doctor said she had no disease but her vital organs had worn out. She was sick nine days and passed away with but very little pain or suffering.



Biography by Benson Y. Parkinson
Arabella Ann Chandler was born February 27, 1824, in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, England, the fourth child of George Chandler and Esther Glover. The family group sheets give her name as Arabella, though in her history her children George and Caroline call her “Arabell Ann,” so maybe that’s how she pronounced her name. Arabella’s parents had thirteen children, of which seven died in childhood. George and Caroline describe their grandparents this way:

“George Chandler was an unusual character, being high-minded, strict in his habits, exacting in his discipline, and immaculate in his dress and personal appearance. Everything about him, both in private and in public, must conform to his social ambition. He would not recognize his own children until they were up to his standard in personal appearance.

“. . . Esther Glover, was of modest disposition, highly refined, naturally artistic, scrupulously clean, and possessed of unusual executive ability. Arabell Ann inherited these characteristics from her parents.”

The Chandlers went to church and read the Bible in the home.

Arabella’s family was prosperous. She went to school, studied literature, and spent a lot of time horse back riding. But then her father suffered a financial reversal. Much of their property was tied up in litigation and was never recovered. Arabella learned dress-making and millinery (women’s hat making) to help support the family. George died in 1839, when Arabella was about 15. Before long, Arabella was supporting her mother and brother Frederick, who was only 5 when their father died.

In 1842, Esther, Arabella, and Frederick were baptized into The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Arabella was 18 at the time. Arabella did missionary work by distributing tracts door-to-door in Cheltenham. In 1849, when Arabella was 25, her mother died. Arabella’s sister Clarissa and her husband John Alder, a member of the Church since 1842, emigrated to St. Louis in 1850.1 Arabella saved her money and earned enough for her and Frederick to follow them in 1851. They sailed with a company of Saints on the George W. Bourne to New Orleans and then by riverboat to St. Louis. Arabella worked at dressmaking and millinery to try to earn enough money to continue on to Zion. She met a recent convert, Samuel Rose Parkinson, also English, and married him on January 1, 1852. She was 27 at the time, and he just 20.

Samuel was doing well as a drayman (someone who hauls things for a living), owned his teams, and had money in the bank. Their first child, Samuel Chandler, was born February 23, 1853. The Parkinsons left their home and business in 1854 to come to Utah, bringing Frederick as well as Samuel’s little sister Lucy with them. Arabella had to cook over buffalo chips, and once they saw a buffalo stampede. They encountered Indians, including a party of 350 fresh from raiding, whom the pioneers fed and gave gifts. The Parkinsons and their company narrowly escaped a massacre at Fort Laramie.

Arabella and Samuel moved first to Kaysville. Samuel built her a log house with a dirt roof and a dirt floor. On August 1, 1855, she had a girl, Charlotte, and the next day, August 2, Charlotte’s twin brother, William. Arabella was in bed with them when a storm blew a part of the roof off the house, drenching mother and babies with rain and mud, but they pulled through. Samuel gardened, raised stock, ran a threshing machine, and worked on the fort. Arabella kept house and sewed for her family and for hire. Their son George was born July 18, 1857. Samuel was called up in the Utah War and spent much of that winter on guard duty in the cliffs in Echo Canyon. On July 7, 1859, they had another son, Franklin. Arabella’s brother Frederick got restless in Utah and, contrary to the counsel of Brigham Young, left for California to look for gold. He wrote for a while but then stopped, and though they tried to find him and reestablish contact, they never could. Arabella sorrowed over him as long as she lived.

In the spring of 1860, the Parkinsons joined 12 other families who moved to Cache Valley and settled along the Muddy River. They called their village Green Meadows. When President Brigham Young visited in July to organize the ward, he asked them to change the name of the river to Cub Creek and the name of the town to Franklin, after Apostle Franklin D. Richards, and they obliged. For the first few years they thought they were in Utah, but when the surveys came through, Franklin proved to be the oldest town in Idaho. Samuel farmed, hauled goods to Montana, and started a store in their house. Arabella made soap, molded candles, cured meat, made the buckskin shirts and trousers that her husband and sons wore, wove the linsey-woolsey cloth (a course mixture of wool and linen or cotton) and sewed the dresses that she and her daughters wore. Often she used horsehair for thread.

Samuel worked on ditches, helped build the school, and served as constable and as a minuteman—they rode out in response to Indian raids every year. Arabella was tending store one day when an Indian man came in and threatened to kill her if she didn’t give him liquor. She kept cool and ordered him from the store, and he obeyed. Arabella’s and Samuel’s second daughter, Esther, was born February 2, 1862.

In 1863 the U.S. Army attacked the Shoshoni on Bear River, 12 miles north of Franklin, killing many hundreds of men, women, and children. The Mormons helped care for the survivors on both sides. Arabella and Samuel took in a Shoshoni boy who survived the massacre and raised him, giving him the name of Shem Parkinson. Shem was by some accounts an angry boy, hard for Arabella to handle, and even pulled a knife on Samuel once. But he joined the Church and became a deacon. He died of quick consumption in 1881. Arabella’s son Albert was born August 8, 1863 but died at 9 months. Arabella’s children write: “This caused her great sorrow. However, there were so many responsibilities crowding on her that she was forced to dismiss her sorrow as much as possible to carry out her duties.” Clara was born April 18, 1865 and Caroline November 10, 1866, making five boys and four girls born to Samuel and Arabella.

Samuel was doing well now at farming, freighting, and managing the store. According to his daughter Vivian, Samuel and Arabella discussed plural marriage even before they married. Samuel told Arabella: “You know, I know that’s true, that church. And if I join it I’m going to join it whole hand or none. And that means if there ever comes a time I think I should take another wife, I’m going to do it. So now you make up your mind because that’s what I’m going to do.” After getting Arabella’s consent, Samuel made cautious inquiries about marrying Charlotte Smart, the daughter of his friend and business partner Thomas S. Smart. Charlotte was willing but on her father’s advice told Samuel to wait a year. She also asked him not to court her during that time, out of consideration for Arabella. They talked only briefly at Church functions, danced at parties, and were rarely if ever alone. Samuel married Charlotte in 1866. He was 35 and Charlotte 17. Arabella, age 42, had given birth to Caroline, her youngest, just a month before. Samuel married Charlotte’s sister Maria two years later, when Maria was also 17. According to George and Caroline, Arabella lived the law of Sarah: “She knew by the revelation from God that her domestic life for time and all eternity was involved in . . . the celestial order of marriage, and upon this conviction she stepped forth and gave her husband these two wives to become the mothers of his children.” Charlotte tended Arabella’s children so Arabella could be present at Maria’s wedding.

Samuel rotated between wives, a week at each. Arabella had a house, and Charlotte and Maria lived for years in separate rooms in another one. Between the three families Samuel eventually had 32 children. The various histories depict Samuel’s homes as happy and say all three wives were peacemakers and devoted to their families. Arabella’s children were having children at the same time as the other wives, which must have meant Samuel’s two younger families got an extra portion of his attention. He had other demands that kept him away as well. He became the manager of the Franklin Co-op, which included a woolen mill and other undertakings besides the store. He served as a counselor in the same bishopric for 30 years, which they figured was a record. In 1873 the Church sent him on an exploration mission to Arizona. He went to prison for polygamy for five months in 1886. Arabella asked if she could send a bed with him, and the marshal said no, just a quilt and pillow. So she made him a quilt with eight pounds of wool. She sent him care packages with cakes, candies, and fruit. She kept the family going and looked over his financial affairs while he was gone.

Arabella was thin, of medium height, with brown, wavy hair and brown eyes. Her children write that “her integrity was unimpeachable and that she was trustworthy in all her social and business transactions in life and has carefully trained her children in habits of industry, economy and strict morality. . . . She could endure long hours and was extremely patient and kind. She rather shunned public notoriety. She was very sensitive in the care of her husband especially when he was suffering with severe headaches.” They note: “She seldom gave a distinct order or made a rule. Her children learned from early infancy, from her attitude of mind, that if a thing were right it must be done and there ceased to be a question about it.”

Arabella made one trip East that we know of, to St. Louis in 1879, 25 years after leaving. Samuel needed to buy equipment for the woolen mill, and Arabella accompanied him. They visited Samuel’s stepfather and brothers and sisters and Arabella’s sister Clarissa.

Samuel built Arabella a large new house in Franklin, and when he got out of prison for polygamy, she had the idea of having a party for all the old folks in town. They issued invitations to all over 60, “regardless of creed or color,” as well as missionary wives, widows, and orphans. The party was such a success they decided to hold them every year. Samuel held weekly “home nights” for his three families and once a month at Arabella’s for all the families. (This was years before the Church adopted the family home evening program.) They’d visit, talk about family problems, have treats, and entertain. As the kids left home, the three families began gathering for an annual reunion at Arabella’s. Samuel used to call them “heaven on earth.” One of Arabella’s last requests was that the family keep her home when she died as a gathering place for the annual reunions.

Arabella developed cataracts as she aged, so her sister-wife Charlotte would send her boys up to get her wood, and her girls to help with her cleaning. She died August 9, 1894. The doctor said she had no disease but that her vital organs had worn out. Samuel died 25 years later at age 88 in 1919.

Notes

1. Clarissa Chandler Alder may have been a member at this time also. We know she was baptized in 1882, but members were often rebaptized as a way to renew their covenants. John Alder died in 1852 in St. Louis. Clarissa then married Thomas Binnington.

Histories

George C. Parkinson and Caroline C. P. Goaslind, “Biography of Arabell Ann Chandler Parkinson.” A very adulatory history written by two of Arabella’s children. My history is largely an abridgment of this one. I have seen this history in at least two versions. One includes family data from a 1935 family reunion. Another brings it forward to 1947 and adds her physical description, etc., but omits important details from the earlier version.
William H. Smart, “Arabella Ann Chandler Parkinson," obituary, Deseret Evening News, 23 Aug. 1894. This is not as detailed but does give the important fact of Arabella’s tracting in Cheltenham.
Benson Y. Parkinson, “Samuel Rose Parkinson (1831–1919)” (Oct 2002). A companion piece to this—numerous details of Arabella and Samuel’s life together. See also sources listed there.
Preston Woolley Parkinson, The Family of Samuel Rose Parkinson (2001). Preston is a grandson. His treatment of Samuel includes many details of Arabella’s life.
Lydia Dunford Alder, “Reminiscences of the Pioneers of 1854”; Improvement Era, July 1908, 708–13; “The Massacre at Fort Laramie,” Improvement Era, June 1909, 636–38. Lydia married George Alder, Arabella’s sister Clarissa’s son. These articles give several of Samuel and Arabella’s experiences crossing the plains.
Thomas Ambrose Poulter, in Utah Pioneer Biographies (1964), 44:139–41, available at the Family History Library. More pioneer experiences by a trailmate.
Samuel Rose Parkinson, Founders’ Day Speech (1911), in Lester P. Taylor, Samuel Rose Parkinson: Portrait of a Pioneer [1977], 77–79. Details of early life in Franklin. 
Chandler, Arabella Ann (I21116)
 
12 For some time I have been thinking about and would like to write a little about what I remember about my paternal grandfather Anthon F. Andreasen. I knew Grandpa probably better than most of the grandchildren so that is why I wanted to write a little about him.
My father, Elmer Andreasen, who was the only son, wrote a short history of his father, and my Aunt Martha, one of four daughters also wrote a history of her father. Both of the histories are interesting but also are very different, enough so a person wonders if they are talking about the same person. I think this may say more about the writer than about the subject they are writing about. I am sure that the impressions and remembrances that I have of Grandpa will probably tell as much about me as they do about him. (
Grandpa was born in Denmark in 1876, the year of Custer’s Last Stand. When his family moved from Denmark, they settled in Ogden Valley in the town of Eden. He had a Shire stallion while he lived in Eden. He continued to live in Eden for quite a few years after he was married and then he moved to Farr West. His old farm is on the old highway that goes past Smith and Edwards. An old shed is all that remain of the buildings they had when they lived there.
Grandpa was 60 years old when I was born so my remembrances are of his older life. He had a gray horse named “Cap” as long as I could remember. It was his pride and joy.
Grandpa was a difficult person to get to know. I used to work in the fields with him while I was growing up. I think he liked me but he was not one to express how he felt about people. I remember he went to see me off, with my folks, when I went into the service [in December 1954]. He had a bit of advice he gave me as I left, it was part of a poem I think but the line I remember was “learn to labor and to wait” which when I think about it , is pretty good advice for someone going out to conquer the world. I didn’t realize until years later how significant it was for Grandpa to see me off. He didn’t do that sort of thing for very many people that I know of and that is one reason that I think he liked me even though I used to wonder because of some of the things he would say.
As long as I can remember Grandpa was hard of hearing. He could still hear until I was 8 - 10 years of age (1946-1948) but when he was in his late 60’s he got sick and lost almost all of his hearing. After that he couldn’t really associate with others. When everyone would talk at once he couldn’t hear what was being said. That made it hard for him to socialize and caused some people to not like him. I think one of the reasons he seemed anti-social or aloof was because he had such a difficult time hearing what was being said.
From then on he had to wear a hearing aid to hear anything at all. His hearing aid sat in his pocket and the amplifier was attached to his ear. The background noise from the hearing aid used to be irritating to him, so he only used it when he needed too. Most of the time when he was working in the field, he would take the hearing aid out of his ear and put it in his pocket. If Grandpa didn’t want to hear someone, especially Grandma, he would turn off his hearing aid. That would make Grandma angry.
He was quite a handsome young man and probably got a little spoiled because he was the only boy with several sisters. He did have a half-brother, Charlie Jensen, by his mother’s first marriage, who was nine years older than he was.
He served a mission to Denmark for the LDS Church when he was in his 20’s.
Grandpa married my grandmother when he was about 30 years old and she was 20. They made quite an attractive couple. Aunt Martha told me that she thought theirs was a marriage made in heaven. From what I saw while I knew them it was anything but. I thought it was a marriage of two very different people. I can’t remember of them ever going anywhere or doing anything together just for fun. Seems to me they argued more than they did anything else. Grandma loved to go visit people and had friends everywhere, Grandpa did not share this at all. I remember Grandma telling me that one of the big dreams of her life was to retire from the farm and travel, but when she told this to Grandpa he wanted nothing to do with it. I know this was a frustrating thing to her but I often wondered why they never talked of such a thing until they were old enough to retire.
Grandpa, helped build the road down Ogden Canyon from Huntsville to 12th Street in Ogden. He had a team of horses so they paid him more. Fred) He also had a scraper that he used to help build the road.
Note: We had a neighbor who’s father, Charlie Thurston,
came to live with him. He had worked on the road with Grandpa Anthon and he told us a little about what they did. He told us that years later he saw President McKay sitting and he went up to him and slapped him on the knee and said, “Dady….” President McKay said that it had been a long time since he had heard that.
Grandpa was the builder in our family. He built everything with hand tools, mainly a hammer and hand saw. When I was sixteen he bought a circular saw from Sears. I think that was the only power tool he ever owned.
He did all of the building in our family. He was always building or remodeling something. Thanks to him we had a house. Grandpa would only build in the fall and the spring when all the farm work was done. When spring came he would stop building so he could be out in the fields.
He helped my Dad build the out buildings on our farm. He was the one who remodeled and added two rooms and a bathroom onto the two room house I grew up in. He was pretty good at taking some old materials and making something serviceable out of it, not necessarily pretty but usually serviceable. He wasn’t bothered by building codes. The foundation under the addition he put on our house was only about 8 inches wide and I don’t think it was even a foot deep. I didn’t realize until years after why the doors didn’t work and the floor slanted. No thought of putting footings down below the frost line or any of the practices that are required today.
When I was a little kid the old plaster in our kitchen fell off the ceiling, it was a miracle it didn’t kill Mary Lou who was a baby at the time. Grandpa was the one who redid the plaster.
Grandpa built houses with old materials. In 1924 the red brick house he and his family lived in was destroyed by fire, he built another house for them. He also built the house he and Grandma lived in, the one called “the Gingerbread house”, when he was 75 years old. He mixed by hand, in an old wheelbarrow, all of the concrete that went into the house. He used whatever materials he could get his hands on. Some of the lumber and items had been used before, the rest he bought.
He was always a faithful churchgoer but he did not instill in all of his children the same values that he had. They did not live lives of full activity in the Mormon Church like Grandpa thought they should. I think his family was a big disappointment to him and perhaps one of the reasons he used to loose himself in his farm work. I have wondered if the Church had the emphasis on families that they do now if things would have been any different, Grandpa being the faithful obedient person he was.
Grandpa did have a temper and sometimes it went wild. His way of showing love for his family was to do “To Do Lists” that would help them. Grandpa was a good example to others, he led a clean life, he worked hard and people respected him for the kind of person he was.
Once when Grandma was on her way home from Utah, she picked up a hitch hiker and brought him home to stay. Grandpa was very concerned about what could happen to her.
Grandpa was a quite a preacher. I heard him at a Sacrament meeting when he gave a right smart sermon. I was impressed. My Dad said his Dad always felt good when he was asked to speak. Grandpa used to read a lot and was well versed in Church Doctrine. He would speak with no notes. They did not have the block program, as a result there was no time limit for Sacrament Meeting. If he wasn’t asked to talk and was asked to pray it would be a 15 minute prayer. He was invited to speak at funerals and other meetings. There were three guys called upon, back then, to preach at funerals, Elton Hatch, Leland Woodbury and Grandpa.
My Dad used to talk about the way his father used to enjoy speaking but he (my Dad) thoroughly disliked it. I sometimes wonder why someone who didn’t talk to people much would enjoy talking before a congregation but I think part of it was because hearing and listening to others was not a factor when you are the speaker. Another thing, it is quite different to be able to prepare and organize your thoughts ahead of time than to be a spontaneous conversationalist.
When Grandpa lived in Farr West, he was drafted during the 1st World War. They signed the peace treaty before he served.
In 1920 Grandpa moved from Farr West to Idaho. My Dad said that he came to Idaho to get rich. Grandpa grew hay, grain and potatoes (everyone grew potatoes back then). He had milk cows, one riding horse and several teams over the years. Grandpa owned a gray horse team. When they died he brought another gray team. He never owned a tractor. His last team he bought a brown horse team.
Grandpa was a hard worker and expected others to work hard too. My Dad worked pretty close with Grandpa. He thought my dad was kind of lazy because he liked to go fishing and do things with his horses and other things.
Edward Johnson, a grandson, lived with Grandpa and Grandma for several years. As he got older he fell into disfavor with grandpa partly because he didn’t come and help in the fields like Grandpa thought he ought too.
Grandpa struggled with farming. He was known as the “Weed King” in View. One year the threshers cut his beans but refused to thresh them because of the red root weeds in them. Grandpa went through his beans by hand and took out all the red roots so they could be threshed. This was in the days before combines.
He struggled with knowing when to sell his crop. Sometimes he missed the best price because he was hoping for a little more. Farmers were poor. They scrabbled for a living. During the depression he almost lost his farm. My Dad sold his little band of sheep and used the money to save the farm. He was given half of the farm to pay back the money.
One year Grandpa hired three guys from Utah to help him pick potatoes. One of them said his name was Ted Williams. One night they took his saddle and other stuff including a tap and die set and left. He never reported it. They got away “scott free”.
Grandpa was always out in the fields working. When the relatives would come from Utah he wouldn’t come in from the fields to visit, he always claimed to be too busy.
He farmed his farm well past the age when most people retire. When he was 82 years old he had an accident when he was plowing the plow tipped over in the mud, he broke his hip and crawled to the house. He was taken to the old Burley Hospital. My classmate who was a nurse took care of him. She said he was hard to work with. He told her, “No young wiper snapper is goin’ take my pants down”. Grandpa rarely went to doctors.
He recovered enough to run his farm for a few more years before he sold it to Jess Searle and sat down to wait to die.
If something had happened to Grandma before he died, someone would have gotten some cheap dogs. He hated those things. They were miniature blood Pomeranian and Maltese that she raise to sell. They were all over the house and porch and some of them were in the bottom kitchen drawers where they raised their litters.
Grandpa, Anthon Fredrick Andreasen, died September 29, 1965 when he was 89 years old.
Grandpa is part of all of us. There is some of him in me, some of it is good and some of it is bad. Our Ancestors are our Ancestors and we need to appreciate them for what they did.
Written by Frederick James Andreasen 1980's,
added to in 1999 and June 2017
Typed September 2017






"One Sunday, in the year 1888, as my father and mother were taking us home from Sunday School, he stopped the carriage in front of a tent a photographer had set up for a few days there in Eden, Utah, and had our pictures taken. My youngest sister, Emma, then five years old, sat for the picture on a little chair in front center between father and mother, also seated on chairs. She had her little doll sitting beside her on the floor. My father's name was Jens Peter Andreasen while my mother's name was Ingeborge Catherine Mouritzen. In the rear of father and mother stood the other four children, I, Veta Elfreda Patra, then eleven years old, stood on the right of my father with my hand on his right shoulder, while my brothers, Charles Jensen, (the only child by my mother's first husband Frantz Jensen) and Anthon Andreasen stood on my left with my sister Inga Catherine on their left. The suit my father was wearing was made by hand by my mother. She owned one pair of scissors, one thimble and two needles. Always, while she was sewing, she would sing the song that went like this: "Tomorrow the sun may be shining although it is cloudy today. Why worry or fret, complaining, there will be a way open if you will." Father was about 48 1/2 years old when this picture was taken. He was the ward clerk and president of his priesthood quorum. He would read out loud to my mother every night. Mother was 46 1/2 years old. She made the dress she was wearing by hand. She was the secretary of the Relief Society of the L.D.S. Church in the Town of Eden and took care of music. Her voice had a perfect pitch. When I was fourteen years of age I was the organist. Anthon, then 12 1/2 years old, later went to Weber college (Acadamy) in Ogden, Utah, and filled a mission to Denmark when he was 24 years of age. The dress I was wearing was made by Rozella Ferrin Larkin's mother, Mrs. Moroni Ferrin, while the dress my 7 1/2 year old sister Catherine was wearing, as well as the one my five year old sister Emma was wearing was made by my mother."

When my brother, Charles Jensen, was twenty-one years old, he left home for Nevada, where he drove a stage coach from Wells to Elko, carried the mail, using four horses on the coach. He was a wonderful person with horses. Later he married Bertha, Rudolph Klinkie's sister, whom he lost at the birth of her second child. Her first child was named Alma Jensen (Murphy - John) She was my daughter Mary's age. She lives one hundred miles south of Wells, Nevada, in a town named Arthur. One year after the family picture was taken, Jens Peter Andreasen, my father, went to Denmark on a two year mission. While on his mission my mother became very ill with an abscess on her chest. We three sisters sat up all night taking turns in treating of the abscess with oatmeal poultices and seeing to it that she got good food. She was bed-ridden for two months. Old Adam Peterson came over three or four times during that winter with a basket of delicious food. My brother Anthon was about fourteen and one-half years old and it was my responsibility to help him with the milking."
By Elfreyda Andreasen Malan 
Andreasen, Anthon Frederick (I21785)
 
13 Some of the most meaningful memories I have of my dad, Gordon Everett Nielson, are those involving his providing medical care to friends, family, and even complete strangers, in very unlikely places.
From my early childhood, while we were living in a home on the beach in Laie, Hawaii, I remember there being a knock on the door at some point in the evening. I know it was after Dad had already spent the day in his small clinic there in Laie, and that it was after dark, although I don't have any recollection of what time it actually was. (And this was not an isolated, one-time occurrence.) At the door were a couple of members of a local Polynesian family. They were in need of medical care and although there were medical services available at a small hospital in a nearby town, everyone in the village knew, and expected that, Dad would take care of them and make them well. He was "their" doctor. One evening I remember that as the evening progressed, others kept showing up and at a time that was well past my bed-time, the "lanai" (our covered patio), was crowded with residents of the community and their families, being taken care of by Doc Nielson.
Dad had a "call bag" that he took everywhere with him. Sometimes you will still see a doctor that has a call bag, but they're typically just little bags, no bigger than a medium-sized women's purse. Dad's call bag was enormous, like a small suitcase, probably weighing 15 pounds or more. Whenever he left home for more than just a short time, particularly if he was going out of town, he carried that with him. I remember many times while growing up at home, helping him go through the contents, making sure all the medications and supplies were fresh and refilled. Dad had the capacity, with that call bag, to even perform minor surgery or care for a heart attack patient.
I've seen him, and even helped him, do both. Even on vacations such as when visiting the Mayan ruins at Tikal in Guatemala; or while on the island of Roatan off the coast of Honduras; or when on hunting trips as in the malpai country near Bagdad, Arizona...Dad was providing medical care and relief to those who needed it, just because he could........and because that's what his heart told him to do. 
Nielson, Gordon Everett (I182)
 
14 In Donald Benson Alder and Elsie L. Alder, comp., The Benson Family: The Ancestory and Descendants of Ezra T. Benson (The Ezra T. Benson Genealogical Society, Inc., 1979), 224
Lucinda West was the widow of Joseph West. She was born 22 Oct 1826 at Ulysses, Seneca, New York, the daughter of William and Elizabeth Barton. Lucinda West received her patriarchal blessing 9 Sept 1845 by Joseph William Smith in Nauvoo, Illinois. Lucinda was endowed by the name of Lucinda West at Nauvoo 21 Jan 1846, and she was sealed to Ezra T. Benson 18 March 1847 at Winter Quarters, Indian Territory. This was solemnized by Pres. Brigham Young, witnesses, Heber C. Kimball and O. Pratt.

Joseph West was born 23 June 1822 in Venango County, New York, the son of Alva West and Sally Benedict. Joseph West became a carpenter on the Nauvoo Temple; also he was set apart as an ordinance worker in the Nauvoo Temple, 7 Feb 1846.

Joseph West died in 1846, place unknown.

Nothing further is known of Lucinda West Benson. It is not known whether she crossed the plains or not.

(http://etb.bensonfamily.org/wives-kids/lucinda-alder.htm) 
Barton, Lucinda (I122735)
 
15 VR is much loved in Cedar City because of his tremendous sense of humor. He was a popular professor on campus because his lectures were so much fun. Comments by Kerry Jones, President of the State Bank of Southern Utah. Degree in Agricultural Science. He would have preferred being a farmer, but his wife wouldn't live on the farm in Monroe. Fairly quiet, but a great dry wit. Loves to tell jokes. Loves animals. He got a horse at age 16 in Monroe and said to his mother, "I'm going down to the Arizona strip to visit my uncles." and he left. Also maintains a home in Beaverdam, Arizona. Magleby, Villyar R (I5330)
 
16 !1787 census of Vejlby, Odense, Denmark GS#039,000

BIRTH: Vejlby Church Rec. GS#050,482 
Madsdatter, Karen Margrethe (I2967)
 
17 !Died: U. S. Navy Aircraft Carrier, USS Bunker Hill, Pacific Ocean Kimball, Vaughn Roberts (I108020)
 
18 !Immigration: Departed 16 Jul 1839 Sydney, New South Wales, Australia on ship MEDWAY with mother Alice Briggs. Arrival 20 Aug 1839 Hobart, Tasmania, Australia. Briggs, Sarah Elizabeth (I80546)
 
19 !Obituray: August 25, 1929 - March 6, 2013

Ralph C Duncan passed away on March 6, 2013, at age 83. Ralph was born in Fillmore, Utah on August 25, 1929 to Joseph Clem Duncan and Retta Lund Duncan.

He graduated from Millard High School in 1948. He was drafted during the Korean War and served in the U.S. Army Military Police Force from 1951- 1953 in Japan. After army duty he drove for the Wycoff Co. Later he worked for the Utah State Road Dept along with his farming on the side. He retired from the state job and then worked full time on his farm. He was an excellent welder skilled at repairing and building new equipment for use on the farm.

Ralph was playful and fun. The 4th and 24th of July holidays "at dawn's early light" were greeted by the sound of the cannon blast – everyone awoke and celebrated.

Ralph is survived by his brother David (Joan) Duncan, Kernersville, NC. Preceding him in death were his parents, sister LaVeda, and brothers Melvin W and Claude L .

Funeral services will be held Friday, March 15, 2013 at 1:00 PM at the Meadow Ward LDS Chapel. Friends and family may call at 12 noon prior to the service. Interment will be in Meadow City Cemetery under the direction of Olpin Stevens Funeral Home, Fillmore, Utah. 
Duncan, Ralph Clem (I33569)
 
20 !Obituray: Norma Stewart Pate 1915 ~ 2004 Our beloved Mother and Grandmother, Norma Stewart Pate, passed away Feb 9, 2004 in Lehi, Utah. She was born Oct 13, 1915 in Hinckley, Utah to George Lyle and Clara Mae Walker Stewart. She was the second of 11 children. She graduated from Hinckley High School, Excelcis Beauty College, and Utah Technical College. Married Bud W. Pate, Aug. 15, 1936 in Holden Utah. In her younger years she participated in musical productions and drama. While attending Beauty School in Salt Lake City, she sang with the Mormon Tabernacle Choir. She had a beautiful voice and sang many years with the American Fork City Choir. She had a wonderful talent of playing the piano. She is a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. She is the mother of five children; Patricia Rae (William) Fox of Sandy; Bud Duane (Joan) Pate of Holladay; Kay L. (Jane) Pate of American Fork; Cynthia (Lynn) Durrant of Pleasant Grove; Julianne (Melvin) Blaney of Payson. She has 23 grandchildren and 32 great-grandchildren. Survived by her five children and brothers and sisters George Lyle Stewart, Florence Stewart Smith, Mary Stewart Abbott, Melba Jean Stewart Caldwell, Reed Murdock Stewart, Joy Stewart Christensen, Duane Walker Stewart, Carl Don Stewart. Preceded in death by parents, brother Walker Duncan Stewart, sister Delna Stewart Arthur and grandson Christopher Bud Pate. Funeral services will be held at 11 am Saturday, Feb. 14, 2004 in the Anderson & Sons Mortuary Chapel, 49 E 100 N, American Fork. Friends may call Friday evening from 6-8 p.m. and one hour prior to the services. Stewart, Norma (I33424)
 
21 !Obituray: Richard Michael Labrum was born July 19,1974 in Delta, Utah to Robert E. and Arlene Edwards Labrum. Preceded in death by his father, he is survived by his mother, brother Jeremy, his grandmother Mary Gene Edwards and a host of aunts and uncles. Labrum, Richard Michael (I21189)
 
22 !Ocupation: Cotton Twiner Stott, Abraham (I80531)
 
23 "I was born on a farm in a log house in Dwight Township, Huron County, Michigan on June 29, 1872. I worked on my father's farm until the spring of 1896 when I left home to do for myself. I went to Gladstone, Michigan and worked in a store and saw mill until October of the same year. I then went to work for the Soo Line Railway at Gladstone, Michigan. I worked in the Round House for 20 months as an engine wiper, fire builder, storehouse keeper until I was promoted to locomotive fireman from about June 1898 until March 1903 when I was promoted to locomotive engineer and have been running an engine of the largest type ever since. October 11, 1899 I married the sweetest little girl in Wisconsin and if you don't think so just ask our 3 boys. Her name was Cora Estelle Maxfield of Plover, Wisconsin, Portage County."

Charles was a very large and strong person. When in his prime he weighed 195 pounds. He was 5'11" tall and was very large boned. He had a reach from finger tip to finger tip of 84" (7 feet). He could chin himself 20 times with one arm. As a young man he helped with the chores on his father's farm. He often told how he would crawl under a colt every day and lift the colt on his back. He continued to do this until the colt became a full grown horse weighing approximately 1000 lbs. until one day he missed. After that day he was no longer able to lift the horse.

He was a very kind person and was good to everyone. He was very thoughtful of his Cora and often brought her gifts for no special reason. He enjoyed being engineer on the special picnic train that went to Buffalo, Minnesota. Walter remembers well riding in the engine on that train and also on the train that went to Rhinelander, Wisconsin. On that train they would go from Minneapolis to Rhinelander, stay overnight and over Sunday, then return on Monday to Minneapolis. When Charles was growing up there was no radio and no television. For fun he participated in seeing who could go hand over hand on a rope from the ground to the top of the 2 1/2 story barn and back down in the shortest length of time. Every Sunday he would wrestle with his brother Dave out behind the barn. Dave was 5 1/2 years older. Dave was always able to pin his brother. Finally one Sunday Charles pinned Dave and after that Dave would not wrestle his brother.

When he was sixteen, Charles worked in the lumber camps during the winter. One time to get to the camp he had to walk 30 miles in a snow storm with a fifty pound pack on his back. His normal walking speed was about 4 miles per hour.

In his later years, Charles was never more than 15 lbs. above his prime weight of 195 lbs.

Charles Robert Whitchurch died in his sleep October 26, 1942 and was interred in the wall of the Sunnyside Cemetery in Long Beach, California. When placed in the casket he had to be placed partly on his side because his shoulders were so broad that he couldn't be laid flat.

One of the remarks he used to make was: "Always push yourself away from the table when you are still a little hungry." We should all be following this good advise.

From the papers of Walter and Phyllis Whitchurch. 
Whitchurch, Charles Robert (I122846)
 
24 "I, Orson Nephi Bangerter, was born in a two-room adobe house with a dirt roof. About seventy yds south of the house was a large hollow and a large barn was built on the north side. Then, about 150 feet north was a irrigating ditch, which at times had fish in it. When I was five years old, I made a net of burlap sack with a hoop, catching about five dozen fish on my fifth birthday. Feb 1890, I with my parents, moved to Bountiful, also joined the different auxiliary organizations. I was baptized in the old Mill pond Mar 28, 1893 [by Heber Holbrook] and was confirmed the same day. In 1899 and 1900 I attended the LDS College in Salt Lake City, Utah. In 1903 I was ordained an Elder by Hyrum Sessions and joined the 2nd Quorum of Elders in the Davis Stake in 1904. I worked in the Temple for the dead.

In Feb 1904 I received a call to go on a mission to Switzerland, leaving Feb 24, 1904 for Europe, where I was successful in learning the language of my mother tongue. After twenty eight months, I again returned home July 16, 1906. July 17, 1905, I went outsight [sic], seeing in different parts of Switzerland and Italy.

Sept 26, 1906, I was married to Edith White in the Salt Lake Temple. Oct 15, 1906, I joined the 28th Ward in Salt Lake City and was a ward teacher from Nov 1, 1906 to June 1907. In July I moved back to Bountiful, Utah, where I continued as a truck gardener until this time. There were six children born to us."

--from the Genealogical Record of Orson Nephi Bangerter  
Bangerter, Orson Nephi (I4708)
 
25 "In the year 1842 President Joseph Smith sought an interview with me, and said, ‘I have a message for you, I have been commanded of God to take another wife, and you are the woman.' … He asked me if I believed him to be a Prophet of God. … He fully Explained to me the principle of plural or celestial marriage … that it would prove an everlasting blessing to my father's house. … [Joseph encouraged her to pray] 'that the grave would kindly receive me that I might find rest on the bosom of my dear [recently deceased] mother … Why Should I be chosen from among thy daughters, Father I am only a child in years and experience.' And thus I prayed in the agony of my soul. … [The marriage] was not a love matter—at least on my part it was not, but simply the giving up of myself as a sacrifice to establish that grand and glorious principle that God had revealed to the world." Walker, Lucy (I88156)
 
26 "One Sunday, in the year 1888, as my father and mother were taking us home from Sunday School, he stopped the carriage in front of a tent a photographer had set up for a few days there in Eden, Utah, and had our pictures taken. My youngest sister, Emma, then five years old, sat for the picture on a little chair in front center between father and mother, also seated on chairs. She had her little doll sitting beside her on the floor. My father's name was Jens Peter Andreasen while my mother's name was Ingeborge Catherine Mouritzen. In the rear of father and mother stood the other four children, I, Veta Elfreda Patra, then eleven years old, stood on the right of my father with my hand on his right shoulder, while my brothers, Charles Jensen, (the only child by my mother's first husband Frantz Jensen) and Anthon Andreasen stood on my left with my sister Inga Catherine on their left. The suit my father was wearing was made by hand by my mother. She owned one pair of scissors, one thimble and two needles. Always, while she was sewing, she would sing the song that went like this: "Tomorrow the sun may be shining although it is cloudy today. Why worry or fret, complaining, there will be a way open if you will." Father was about 48 1/2 years old when this picture was taken. He was the ward clerk and president of his priesthood quorum. He would read out loud to my mother every night. Mother was 46 1/2 years old. She made the dress she was wearing by hand. She was the secretary of the Relief Society of the L.D.S. Church in the Town of Eden and took care of music. Her voice had a perfect pitch. When I was fourteen years of age I was the organist. Anthon, then 12 1/2 years old, later went to Weber college (Acadamy) in Ogden, Utah, and filled a mission to Denmark when he was 24 years of age. The dress I was wearing was made by Rozella Ferrin Larkin's mother, Mrs. Moroni Ferrin, while the dress my 7 1/2 year old sister Catherine was wearing, as well as the one my five year old sister Emma was wearing was made by my mother."

When my brother, Charles Jensen, was twenty-one years old, he left home for Nevada, where he drove a stage coach from Wells to Elko, carried the mail, using four horses on the coach. He was a wonderful person with horses. Later he married Bertha, Rudolph Klinkie's sister, whom he lost at the birth of her second child. Her first child was named Alma Jensen (Murphy - John) She was my daughter Mary's age. She lives one hundred miles south of Wells, Nevada, in a town named Arthur. One year after the family picture was taken, Jens Peter Andreasen, my father, went to Denmark on a two year mission. While on his mission my mother became very ill with an abscess on her chest. We three sisters sat up all night taking turns in treating of the abscess with oatmeal poultices and seeing to it that she got good food. She was bed-ridden for two months. Old Adam Peterson came over three or four times during that winter with a basket of delicious food. My brother Anthon was about fourteen and one-half years old and it was my responsibility to help him with the milking."
By Elfreyda Andreasen Malan 
Andreasen, Jens Peter (I21777)
 
27 "One Sunday, in the year 1888, as my father and mother were taking us home from Sunday School, he stopped the carriage in front of a tent a photographer had set up for a few days there in Eden, Utah, and had our pictures taken. My youngest sister, Emma, then five years old, sat for the picture on a little chair in front center between father and mother, also seated on chairs. She had her little doll sitting beside her on the floor. My father's name was Jens Peter Andreasen while my mother's name was Ingeborge Catherine Mouritzen. In the rear of father and mother stood the other four children, I, Veta Elfreda Patra, then eleven years old, stood on the right of my father with my hand on his right shoulder, while my brothers, Charles Jensen, (the only child by my mother's first husband Frantz Jensen) and Anthon Andreasen stood on my left with my sister Inga Catherine on their left. The suit my father was wearing was made by hand by my mother. She owned one pair of scissors, one thimble and two needles. Always, while she was sewing, she would sing the song that went like this: "Tomorrow the sun may be shining although it is cloudy today. Why worry or fret, complaining, there will be a way open if you will." Father was about 48 1/2 years old when this picture was taken. He was the ward clerk and president of his priesthood quorum. He would read out loud to my mother every night. Mother was 46 1/2 years old. She made the dress she was wearing by hand. She was the secretary of the Relief Society of the L.D.S. Church in the Town of Eden and took care of music. Her voice had a perfect pitch. When I was fourteen years of age I was the organist. Anthon, then 12 1/2 years old, later went to Weber college (Acadamy) in Ogden, Utah, and filled a mission to Denmark when he was 24 years of age. The dress I was wearing was made by Rozella Ferrin Larkin's mother, Mrs. Moroni Ferrin, while the dress my 7 1/2 year old sister Catherine was wearing, as well as the one my five year old sister Emma was wearing was made by my mother."

When my brother, Charles Jensen, was twenty-one years old, he left home for Nevada, where he drove a stage coach from Wells to Elko, carried the mail, using four horses on the coach. He was a wonderful person with horses. Later he married Bertha, Rudolph Klinkie's sister, whom he lost at the birth of her second child. Her first child was named Alma Jensen (Murphy - John) She was my daughter Mary's age. She lives one hundred miles south of Wells, Nevada, in a town named Arthur. One year after the family picture was taken, Jens Peter Andreasen, my father, went to Denmark on a two year mission. While on his mission my mother became very ill with an abscess on her chest. We three sisters sat up all night taking turns in treating of the abscess with oatmeal poultices and seeing to it that she got good food. She was bed-ridden for two months. Old Adam Peterson came over three or four times during that winter with a basket of delicious food. My brother Anthon was about fourteen and one-half years old and it was my responsibility to help him with the milking."
By Elfreyda Andreasen Malan 
Andreasen, Inga Catherine (I21787)
 
28 "One Sunday, in the year 1888, as my father and mother were taking us home from Sunday School, he stopped the carriage in front of a tent a photographer had set up for a few days there in Eden, Utah, and had our pictures taken. My youngest sister, Emma, then five years old, sat for the picture on a little chair in front center between father and mother, also seated on chairs. She had her little doll sitting beside her on the floor. My father's name was Jens Peter Andreasen while my mother's name was Ingeborge Catherine Mouritzen. In the rear of father and mother stood the other four children, I, Veta Elfreda Patra, then eleven years old, stood on the right of my father with my hand on his right shoulder, while my brothers, Charles Jensen, (the only child by my mother's first husband Frantz Jensen) and Anthon Andreasen stood on my left with my sister Inga Catherine on their left. The suit my father was wearing was made by hand by my mother. She owned one pair of scissors, one thimble and two needles. Always, while she was sewing, she would sing the song that went like this: "Tomorrow the sun may be shining although it is cloudy today. Why worry or fret, complaining, there will be a way open if you will." Father was about 48 1/2 years old when this picture was taken. He was the ward clerk and president of his priesthood quorum. He would read out loud to my mother every night. Mother was 46 1/2 years old. She made the dress she was wearing by hand. She was the secretary of the Relief Society of the L.D.S. Church in the Town of Eden and took care of music. Her voice had a perfect pitch. When I was fourteen years of age I was the organist. Anthon, then 12 1/2 years old, later went to Weber college (Acadamy) in Ogden, Utah, and filled a mission to Denmark when he was 24 years of age. The dress I was wearing was made by Rozella Ferrin Larkin's mother, Mrs. Moroni Ferrin, while the dress my 7 1/2 year old sister Catherine was wearing, as well as the one my five year old sister Emma was wearing was made by my mother."

When my brother, Charles Jensen, was twenty-one years old, he left home for Nevada, where he drove a stage coach from Wells to Elko, carried the mail, using four horses on the coach. He was a wonderful person with horses. Later he married Bertha, Rudolph Klinkie's sister, whom he lost at the birth of her second child. Her first child was named Alma Jensen (Murphy - John) She was my daughter Mary's age. She lives one hundred miles south of Wells, Nevada, in a town named Arthur. One year after the family picture was taken, Jens Peter Andreasen, my father, went to Denmark on a two year mission. While on his mission my mother became very ill with an abscess on her chest. We three sisters sat up all night taking turns in treating of the abscess with oatmeal poultices and seeing to it that she got good food. She was bed-ridden for two months. Old Adam Peterson came over three or four times during that winter with a basket of delicious food. My brother Anthon was about fourteen and one-half years old and it was my responsibility to help him with the milking."
By Elfreyda Andreasen Malan 
Andreasen, Emma Elvera (I21788)
 
29 "Painter of the American Revolution"; aide-de-camp of General George Washington for 19 days in 1775. Trumbull, John (I98232)
 
30 "Tell it Again."
By Harriet J. Greaves

For some time Carol has been urging me to write up some of the interesting things I have told my children experiences I have had. My grandchildren have thrived on them as well. I suppose it is natural that they should. My grandmother is an interesting subject to me too.

When I was a child she used to arrange our ten day summer vacation to her home in Hyde Park. She would have all the girls of the approximate age go down at the same time. We would go on the train. It was the highlight of our summer when we would board the train with the old valise full of clothes. The conductor seemed to want to disguise the names of the towns. In his nasal twang he would sing out "Franklin Richmon Smithfiel Hyde Par ." And Grandpa would be there in the old surrey with the fringe on top to meet us. What a fun ten days we would have. Grandma would let us go down (to the) cellar and get a bowl full of whatever preserves we wanted out of the huge crocks. She made the best preserves in the world. She always invited the cousins our age who lived in Hyde Park to sleep there. When we would go upstairs to bed Settie, the deaf person who lived with them and loved us all so dearly, would come in to see that we were surely covered up. Such a loving service in 100 degree weather. Then in the night we would hear her coming in again to see that there was sure a "thunder mug" as she called them in her halting language, under each bed. Children who have been raised without a grandmother have missed half their lives.

I remember when I first discovered grandpa had another wife. The first time I went down and was old enough to notice, he got up out of his easy chair and put on his shoes and hat and sort of reluctantly started out the door. I said, "Where are you going, Grandpa?" And he said, "Over yonder." After he went out I asked Grandma where he had gone. She answered, in a tone that didn't invite further questioning, "Over to Susan's."

Father went on a mission to Denmark when I was three years old and Hazel was eleven months. Mother had eight children. I often say it was at least as much her mission as his because times were so hard and she and the boys worked so hard to keep the family and send money to him. Mother homesteaded one hundred and sixty acres of dry farm in the clay hills in Winder. She had to spend the summer months there. A lot of the time she and the three smaller children were there in the shanty alone. We hauled the water for all purposes in cans from our well at home. Aunt Julia and Uncle Joe Roper were proving up on a quarter section joining ours and of course he helped out a lot especially with the lonesome part. Aunt Julia was a remarkable woman. Even though she had only a small board shanty she always had a braided rug on the floor and a table cloth and a nice looking quilt or spread on her bunk. She said any place she had to live had to be fixed up home like as much as was possible. She was President of the Relief Society in our ward and always had a single horse buggy and a bay mare called Snap. This was entirely for her own use. I remember one day we went over to her shanty and a large rattlesnake was lying curled up under this buggy which she had left in the shade in front of the shanty. We called to her so excitedly ¬- my mother was more emotional about things of that nature than she was. She came out and gave the buggy a quick shove onto the rattler which pinned it down while she ran and got the axe and chopped it to bits. What a frightening experience for us! We knew that rattlers were deadly, although I have always been just as terrified of any harmless snake.

My father was in Denmark three winters. He and my uncles had a saw mill up in Birch Creek a few miles east of Mink Creek. Each winter the men folks worked in the canyon getting out logs and bringing them to the mill for sawing. Mother went up there and cooked for the men. We had a one room cabin for cooking and eating in. Also mother and the children slept in it in wall bunks.

Because I was too little to go out in the snow and cold and the money was needed for warm clothing for the boys, I didn't have any shoes. My feet became frozen and for years after as soon as cold weather would come I would start suffering from chill blains. To this day I haven't enjoyed canyons. I suppose I got such a horror of them as a little child. I told my sister Edna once that I didn't care for canyons and she said, "I don’t wonder after those winters in Birch Creek." Snow was even with the top of the house and my brothers had cut steps from the door up to the level and then down to the creek so they could dip up water. One day I cried to go out and see the outside and Lou said, "Hell, I'll bet this kid hasn't been out for days." So he picked me up and carried me with him to dip up a bucket of clear, cold water. At evening Lou spent the time carving out bob sleighs for Floyd and Howard. They were very small but exact replicas of the regular sleigh we used to go up to the canyon and home. I remember how much fun those two little boys had playing with their sleighs. Their job was to keep enough fire wood for mother. As I remember it they must have been good little fellows, entertaining themselves and helping out whenever needed. Always cheerful and enjoying the canyon as if it were a lark. A few years before father died Howard, Selma, Father, Todd and I went up to the old mill site. We could see some of the saw dust and father showed us where the mill and the barn and the cabin all had stood. I will always remember how thrilled father was to go back there.

One night Mother woke up and found Hazel awfully sick. She was taking convulsions and had a high fever. There was nothing there with which to doctor a sick baby and we were thirty miles from town in the dead of winter. Mother sent Laurence out to the bunk house and he called Uncle Joe. He hitched up the team on the sleigh and we started for home. It was so cold and there was a bad blizzard. We had an old dog, Smiler, that we just loved. He was trudging along behind the sleigh and as we passed a farm house in Glencoe a dog came out and fought with our dog. He was pushed under the runners and killed. As we started away I cried and said we couldn't leave him there in the snow. So Lou got off and threw him on the sleigh. After while I went to sleep and so as we were coming down the Davis dugway they rolled him over the hill. This Davis dugway was always a nightmare to me. It is so narrow and steep and such a drop off at the side. Many a vehicle has tipped over and rolled down the hill. My brothers and father used to haul lumber down there and have had many a near tragedy on it. It was with a feeling of relief when the new road to Mink Creek by passed the Davis dugway. I will never forget how sad I was and how broken hearted Howard was at old Smiler’s death. He has always loved dogs. We get home in time to get a doctor and medical aid to Hazel so that she recovered in a few weeks.

It seems that my mind is dwelling on the things that happened while my folks had the saw mill in Birch Creek. Truly they were frontier times. When father’s brother was about twenty, he stayed at the mill to run the saw while father came to town for the 24th of July. While he was greasing the works Mr. McQueen who was the engineer started up the saw and it cut almost through Uncle Ren’s leg. They brought him to town in a wagon. He bled every bit of the way and when they got him here he was almost gone. However they got a doctor and he trimmed up the wound and sewed it up. But he was so weak from shock and loss of blood that it appeared he was dead. In fact the doctor said, "He is gone." My Aunt Olive, who was always very emotional, screamed and Uncle Ren opened his eyes and said, "What's the matter with Olive?" The doctor said it was that scream that saved his life. Some time later, after he was married he had to have his leg amputated.

All my life I remember him as he walked on his cork leg. He learned to handle it very well and always earned a good living for his large family of children. He had a coal yard and was very successful. He was bishop of the Preston Second Ward for a good many years.

When I was a young girl I used to go to the farm with my brothers to cook for them. One day about the time they came in to lunch a thunder storm came up. I have never seen such lightning excepting one other time that I will tell about later. It seemed that a ball of fire came through the phone and exploded all over the room and such a roar of thunder along with it! I was surely thankful the boys were in the house. Afterwards when they went out they discovered that the telephone in our yard was shattered to slivers. The other time was after I was married and had Melvin. We were on the farm. Dad and Melvin and I were sleeping on the screen porch and Clue and Maree and Karma in the room. The range was in there and they said a ball of fire came down and seemed to dance around on the stove until it sort of wore itself cut. Seymour and Don were sleeping in the attic room. We called to them and they didn't answer so we thought they must have been struck. Clue jumped out of bed and out the door and up the ladder in a flash. They were OK but he had them come down as they were scared stiff. They were all soaking wet when they got down, it was pouring so hard. It just kept up that awful thunder and lightning all night long. The next day Emer Miller our neighbor came up. He said, "That is the only night like the battle of the Marne that I have ever experienced."

When I was cooking for my brothers they always teased me because I was a poor fire maker. Lou declares that he came in once and I had pies in the oven and was so disgusted because they wouldn't cook so he looked in and I didn't have a sign of a fire. The big fibber!
My father, James Johnson and dad’s father, Thomas C. Greaves, went on a mission from the Preston Ward at the same time. There were four other missionaries leaving too. They had a party for them and the donations amounted to less than eight dollars each. My father went to Denmark and Grandpa Greaves to England. They went on the same ship from Portland Maine. While Dad’s father was gone he plowed and did other work on the dry farm up on the hill straight north of town about two and a half miles. They lived on their lower farm where Garland Kidd lives now. Dad was eleven years old the year his father was gone and was too small to throw the harness on the horses so he rigged up some pulleys and ropes to pull the harness up and then let it down on the horses’ backs. He says many a time when he worked until dark and then started home he would meet his mother walking up there to see if something had gone wrong. He surely worshipped his mother. She died when he was twenty years old and to this day he can hardly talk about her, his grief at her death was so keen. He was a great one to fix up things like the harness pulleys. After they moved to town in the house next to us which by the way was built on the dry farm and then moved down here he wired up a bell in his room upstairs with a string by his mother’s bed so she could call him mornings. He always got up early and made the fire so it would be warm when his mother and the little children got up.

Melvin must have inherited this characteristic. When he was a scout he fixed up a tin box containing oiled rags, flint, and steel to pass the test of making a fire without matches. For over a year he got up made the fire every morning and didn't use a match once. We bought him a little alarm clock so he could get up in time.

When Grandpa Greaves was or his mission he baptized Wm. George Jay and sent him here. He lived with the family quite a long while. Poor fellow had to put up with a lot of ridiculing and pranks because he was a queer immigrant. Dad’s Aunt Nellie Greaves (later Spidell) taught school out there in the "Yellow Jacket" and lived with the family too. One night Billy Jay called out, "There is a coyote on me." So Aunt Nellie went in and he had a wood tick. He had heard them talk about both of them and got mixed up.

Years later he had some sort of job with the Union Pacific railroad and lived in Ogden. He always led us to believe his job was quite high up in the company. But others said he was just a flunky. When Levean and I went to San Francisco to the World’s Fair we found out. On our way out there I talked to the train master in the Ogden depot and he said we would have to come home on the train that would get in Dayton about 2 am. We would like to come on #29 that got in Dayton at 9 pm. But they wouldn't stop "29 in Dayton. So I wrote and told dad to meet us on the later train. When our train got in the Ogden yards we saw Billy coming through the train. When he spotted us he said, "hurry and get your things ready to get off as soon as the train stops at the depot. You will only have five minutes to catch 29." I told him we couldn't go on it because it wouldn't stop in Dayton. He said, "0 yes it will. I have made arrangements." I told him Todd wouldn't be there to meet us and he said, "Yes he will. I was up there Sunday and told him to be there because I would see that you were on it. I have held 29 a little late purposely." He had a porter to move our bags and hustle us onto the other train and told the conductor, "Take care of these folks and get them off at Dayton. They are my relatives." The conductor said, "Yes, Mr. Jay." So when we were nearing Dayton he came and said, "Are you the ones I have orders to let off at Dayton? It seems a shame to stop this long train on a steep hill." I said, "There is no hill in Dayton." But he just had to gripe a little. Mad because an official had given a few orders. Anyway when we got off the train dad wasn't there. So I went in and phoned and he said, "Where are you?" I said, "In Dayton. Billy said you would be here to meet us." He said, "Well the old rascal. I didn't believe he could do it. I guess he has more authority than we have given him credit for." He came right over and got us.

A few years later when he retired there was a big spludge in the papers about him and we found that what he had told us was true. He had told me once that he was special representative of the managing vice president. "I'm the guy that hires and fires them.."

In his youth he married a girl, Emily Povey, who had immigrated from England. They didn't hit it off and so wanted a divorce and also a church annulment. They met with the bishopric in our front room. In order for the folks to go upstairs to bed it was necessary to go from the kitchen through the front room. The hearing went on and on so long and Edna and the boys wanted to go to bed. Edna had a spoon in her hand. She said, "If they don’t soon go I am going to throw this spoon at the door." Lou said, "You wouldn't dare." So of course she let it fly. Afterwards father told us that when they heard the noise someone said, "What was that?" And Bishop Carver said, "Oh! It is just some of Edna's tom foolishness." I guess he knew Edna. Maybe I have forgotten to mention before this that George H. Carver was our bishop and my father was first counselor and Grandpa Greaves the second.

Before Edna started going with Harrison, she went with Tom Stokes a few times. One Sunday he came with his horse and buggy to take her for a ride. While he was in the house calling for her I got in the buggy determined to go with them. When they came out he pleasantly told me if I would get out they would be on their way. But I said no I was going with them. Edna said, "You little silly, you aren't either." But I was determined. Finally in desperation Tom took a nickel out of his pocket and gave me if I wouldn't go with them. Years later when I was working on the Stake Sunday School board with him I told him about giving me a nickel if I wouldn't go buggy riding with him and it surely embarrassed him.

Lou was a great one to help mother with the kids and the things around home such as kindling wood, wood chopping, keeping the water bucket and reservoir full. How well I remember the Christmas that mother and Edna had made me and Hazel such lovely princess style dresses mine a sort of blue grey and Hazel’s pink. Then she had dressed dolls for us like our dresses. A while before Christmas Hazel came up missing and finally mother found her in the clothes closet. She said, "What are you doing in there?" Hazel said, "Playing with those pretty dolls." Mother went and re hid them and on Christmas morning Hazel said, "These are the dolls I played with." I couldn't figure it out for some time. Anyway on that Christmas morning Lou got up early and made a fire and carried us in to see our things. He has always been such a kind brother.

One Christmas when Melvin was little we were so undecided what to buy for him as he hadn't made any requests. A few days before the big event I was up town doing my shopping and saw a large toy fire engine on the shelf among the groceries in the Greaves store. I thought, "Surely he would like that." So I took note of where it was and came home. I said, "Oh, I wanted a can of salmon for supper and forgot it. Will you run up and get one for me, brother?" So he went and in a few minutes was back without the salmon, and all out of breath. "Mother there is the grandest fire engine up in the store all painted red, with ladders and everything. I want it for Christmas!" You see it was on the shelf above the cans of salmon. He got the fire engine.

'When Melvin and Wayne Gibson were little chaps they used to be the worst climbers. Across the street from us was a row of Lombardy poplars. One summer they spent the whole time up there with one of dad’s saws, sawing off limbs. When they figured they had enough they trimmed and peeled them, they built a log cabin. It was surely a cute little thing. It was about three by four feet and maybe four feet high to the top of the gable end. It was used one year in the 24th of July parade. Verna, dressed in a pioneer costume, stood beside it on a truck. Mrs. Gibson used it for a Primary Stake Festival. It is a wonder though that we lived through the cutting down of the logs. I still remember the horror I would feel when I would look over there and see those two little boys up in those trees two or three times as high as the house.

Speaking of little houses, dad built a darling play house over at the Academy when he was taking shop in high school. He was 17 years old at the time. It was built exactly to scale and style of the houses at the time. It has always been one of Preston’s show pieces. Little kids adore it. When Carol built her house in Preston we let her put it in her back yard. People dad’s and my age who were raised in Preston but have moved away often ask about it when they come back to visit their people.

When Melvin and Tom Robinson were in their early teens they built a row boat. It took them quite a long while. They were so particular to get it just right. Finally it was pronounced "Bear River" worthy by them and their fathers so we loaded it on the trailer and drove up toward Mink Creek where the road is right at the rivers edge. Dad backed the trailer into the river until they could float the boat. Then they jumped in and grabbed the oars. This was about ten o'clock on a Sunday morning. We had instructions to meet them at the Battle Creek bridge at six that evening. We got down there early thinking they would surely be there before that. But no boys nor boat and not even in sight. We waited a while looking up the river. It got six and six thirty. Still not in sight. I walked back to Seamon’s place and phoned the Robinsons to see if they had got home and we had missed them. But they hadn't. I walked back to the bridge. Robinsons came down then too. We knew it would soon be dark. So dad started to walk up along the river and calling. I stood on the bridge looking down and expecting to see their bodies floating along. I could hear dad calling frantically, "Melvin! Tom! Melvin!" And getting more excited all the time. Finally when it was quite dark we heard a faint answer, "We are alright dad, don’t worry." I sank down and sobbed until they got there. You see the river had more bends than we had expected and it just took longer. But what a day. I said, "Never again," but you shall see that determined kids prevail.

The next year they spent a lot of time during the winter making plans and specifications for a motor boat. As soon as they could in the spring they went to the canyon and picked out a nice tree, then sawed it up in the Robinson mill. That summer was spent making a motor boat. We went on our first trip to the Yellowstone Park that summer but Melvin couldn't go because he was so busy on the boat. They wanted to have it ready to go to Bear Lake before the season was over. Along at the last even the neighbors were here giving instructions and a hand at painting. They launched it first on the north lake of Twin Lakes. For the 24th of July they took it to Bear Lake on the trailer behind our car. Verna and Carol and I went too. We had about 9 or 10 punctures and blow outs on the car and trailer. I suppose it was because the lead was so heavy and such bad roads up through Strawberry Canyon. I had a cabin for me and the girls and the boys had expected to sleep out but at night they were so weary that they were glad to roll their bedding out on the floor and sleep there. I cooked the meals of course. We stayed several days.

Verna felt she just had to have a pony. She was crazy about riding. So her first pony was a black horse named Duke. We got her a saddle and bridle and cowboy boots and riding pants and so forth. She had this horse for several years. Each year on April Fools Day her dad went into her room and said, "Duke has a colt." She would jump out of bed so excited and run out to the barn and then dad would say, "April fool!" Each time she would be so disappointed and cross about it. Later on we sold Duke and bought a little bay mare for her. She named this mare Gypsy. After we had kept her around here for a while and Verna had fed her and made friends, she and her dad decided it was time to break her to ride. So one Sunday we had a sort of rodeo out in our field. All the neighbors sat on their fences and dad helped her saddle and bridle the pony. Then Verna got in the saddle and was the first to ride her. She bucked some but Verna stayed on. Was she proud and happy! Every day she came home from school and rode a while. She always rode a lot. During rodeo times she participated always riding in the parade and in the grand entry. One year I made her a red satin blouse and the first day of the rodeo she went over to the park in her new blouse. After while she came rushing back and had one of the trick and fancy riders Mrs. Monty Montana with her. She came in shedding the blouse so happily and said, "Mother, I've sold my blouse to Mrs. Montana!!...for $2.00." The material had cost me $2.25. I have never seen any one so thrilled as she was to think such a grand person had wanted her blouse. I had to hurry and go up and get material and make another one in time for the parade that evening at six. We got a lovely rust color and I told her not to be selling it below cost. She sold her horse after she went to Salt Lake to the University and her saddle after she was married.

When Carol was little she had a hard time to talk plain. LaVeade Evans now Gervais lived near us and she helped her a lot. Carol always called Ralph Evans “Roud Eddy”, and LaVeade “Middy Eddy”, and Leslie, “Weddy Eddy.” Cemetery, “Temeteddy” "Middy Eddy will you go up to the temmeteddy with us?" and so on.

One Christmas when she was three or four years old she took a streak of not wanting to go to bed in decent time. So one night I said, "It's getting pretty close to Christmas. If Santa Claus should peek in the window and see you up he is apt to think to himself, ‘There is no good in going there. That little girl wont be in bed anyway.’" Carol said, "I wish that old (fart) wouldn't always be around peeking in windows." It happened that Levean had bough a nice doll for her gift that year so we didn't bother to get her one. We got a nice telephone and various articles of clothing and a fancy package of raisins. On Christmas morning when she got up there was the phone and raisins and clothing by her stocking. She was so disgusted and said, "Well, I should have thought he would have brought me something besides raisins." I said, "Why there is that nice phone." She said, "He didn't bring me that, you gave it to me. I found that in your cedar chest a long time ago." The little rascal! Anyway we told her maybe it was because she called him a bad name. She was pretty worried and a pretty good girl the next year.

It was a habit of Carol’s that each year at rodeo time, she and Margaret Bingham had a stand to sell things from, out in front of our place. At first it was just lemonade. However, each year it became more of a store until at last they sold home made root beer, candy, cookies, punch, balloons and hobby horses. The last named were fancy things with horses’ heads sawed out of paneling on Carols jig saw, then the features burned with her wood burning set. I don’t know how much the material cost dad but the kids would work all summer on them. They sold them for 75 cents. The last year Mrs. Bingham and I each bought a half dozen tall pink glasses for them to sell their drinks in. They held a pint and sold for a nickel. That year they came running in after they had sold everything and said, "We have cleared $2.50 each besides our tithing." Ralph and LaVeade were here and he was surely amused about the tithing part. He wasn't a member of the church.

When Verna was a little girl she said to me, "I want some magic jeans." I said, "Magic jeans, what are they?" "magic jeans!" She kept being so provoked because I couldn't understand. Finally I said, "Show me." She went and got a magazine. It was unusual for she talked so plain so young.

Carol was born July 9th. I didn't get along so well on account of albumen, so stayed in bed twelve days. On that day there was a circus and they always used to haul the wagons past our place. Verna was so excited and kept running in for me to come and see. Finally she came and said, "Mother come and see the anifals.” So I went on the porch. They were pulling the cages with the elephants and so her “anifals.” When she was grown and Melvin was in Panama he still remembered and on Carol’s birthday sent a card he had made with pictures of circus cages being pulled by elephants. Isn't it queer how these little happenings get imprinted on our memories and shall we say our hearts.

In February after the war II ended Levean and dad and I went to Pittsburgh for a visit with Melvin and his family. Melvin took several days off - he was working for Bethlehem steel at the time so he and his father could go around together. So we had tickets for the stage play, "The Late George Apley" at the Nixon. Melvin and dad went to town in the morning and agreed to meet us at the Nixon at show time. When we got there we couldn't see them so waited and waited. Just as it was curtain time they came legging it up the street as fast as they could, with a guilty look on their faces. We said, "Where in the world have you been?" "To the burlesque show," they answered. When we got home we were talking about it and little Melvin asked what a burlesque show was. His dad said, “Oh, it is a show where the girls come out and dance in their panties." Later we heard Melvin Jr. telling Tom that grandpa and daddy went to a show and the girls came out and danced in their garments.

During the war while Bertha and the children were here a man from Weston got severely burned. Selma was nursing in the hospital at the time and she came from work and over here to tell me about it. She said, "Mr. Kohler from Weston was burning weeds with gasoline and he caught fire and ran a half mile to his home. He is terribly burned all over his back and legs. He is there in the hospital with his bare hinder up in the air." When Levean came home from work little Melvin said, "Aunt Selma came and told us about a man who was burning weeds, using gasoline. He is burned awful bad on his back and legs and is in the hospital. He looks awful. He is lying there with his bung in the sky."

Carol made him a pair if short pants from some tweed material left from Verna's coat. So in the summer Bertha put them on him without a shirt so he could get a sun tan. In a few minutes he came in tugging at the suspenders and said, "I can’t wear these. They hurt my hearts." Bertha said, "Your hearts! What are your hearts?" He pointed to his nipples. Bertha said, "They aren't your hearts." "0, yes they are. That’s where the doctor always tests my hearts."

When Janet was born I was in Haddonfield, New Jersey with Verna. Charles was born three days before Janet. Bertha had phlebitis and needed my help. So as soon as Melvin called me I came back to Pittsburgh. Melvin and the boys met me and on the way home Melvin was telling me what a beautiful little thing she was and said as soon as she was born the doctor said, "It's a little girl, see." Tom said, "Did the baby have clothes on when she was born?" His dad said certainly not and Tom very disgustedly said, "Then how could they tell it's a girl?"

Before she was born the family passed the hospital on their way from town and talked about when Bertha would be going there for the baby to be born and so forth. Tom said, "What kind do they have there, boys or girls?" His dad said, "Why, both of course." Tom said, disgustedly, "That's a heck of a hospital! Why don't you go to one where you will know what you are getting?"

On my 50th birthday my whole family were home. Verna and Newell were here from Salt Lake and Melvin and his family were here from Pittsburgh. The men were harvesting so we had the birthday dinner at night. In the afternoon we fixed the table and little Melvin came in and said, "Are we having a party?" I said, "No, it's my birthday." In a few minutes he and Selma came across the street. He said, "I have been and invited the people to the party." I hadn't counted on any one but my family but he figured if we were having anything Howard and Selma would surely be invited. Tom said, "How old are you, grandma?" I said, "Oh, awfully old 50 years." He wanted to know if that is very old. I said, "It surely is, honey." He said, "Then you will soon be going down to heaven won’t you?" I told him he had the right direction but the wrong destination.

When Janet was about two they came up from Logan one Sunday. I had dinner about ready for the three of us but when they came I had to fix something extra, so it was about one thirty when we were ready to eat. Janet always put her stool right by her grandpa. They sat there and waited during the last preparations, then when we sat down dad asked the blessing. When he was about half through she pulled his hands from his face and said, "That’s enough."

Verna was home for several weeks at the time they moved from New Jersey to New Mexico. We spent several hours each day picking raspberries. Little Charles who was less than two years old had to be out there with us. Usually he followed us along in the patch or sat down and rested. But one day he went out into the play house yard and played for a while. Presently I heard him crying and went to see. He had started through the gate, which had a strong spring on it. His head was caught in the gate and he was pushing on the gate. The harder he pushed the tighter his head was squeezed. Poor little kid! He likes raspberries especially well but sometimes I wonder why.

When we visited them in Alamogordo when Karen was born Charles had a nice truck his grandfather Aldous had got him for his birthday. It had a trailer and he used the box it came in for a garage. Each time the trailer came undone from the truck he would come fussing and say, "Boke a tuck," over and over until we fixed it. They had him sit on the kitchen stool to have his hair cut. So after while when he sat up to eat he sat on the "hair cut."

Janet helped build their house in Logan. They started it about the time she was a year old. Bertha was going to school to get her degree and of course the boys were in school, so as soon as the roof was on dad would take her up there and she would sit in the buggy all day and watch him work. She was the cutest thing. When they would get home to the apartment she would just run back and forth was so tickled to get out of the buggy. I used to tell them they had a high priced baby sitter; but she enjoyed it and I suspect grandpa did too. Later after they moved into the house and dad would be down there working at the finishing, he would often go out to get in the truck to come home and she would be sitting there with her packed suitcase ready to come with him. We were always so happy when they would let her. We have always so enjoyed having our grand¬children here.

Verna and Newell and the children came home from Alamogordo on vacation when Charlie and Janet were three. When they stopped in Logan for a little while then went out to the car to come on, Janet and Charlie were there in the car and Janet had her suit case packed. Bertha said, "You can’t go dear. I'm not going." She said, "Yes, I am going. Charlie is my age." They surely had a good time together. When they left she was willing to go back home.

Dad’s aunt Sadie Kidd lived with us the last six years of her life. She had been crippled since she was a young girl having fallen from a horse. She suffered from curvature of the spine until her death at 46 years. She was in bed ten days her last sickness. I was busy taking care of her in the morning about twelve hours before she died. Melvin came in and said, "Mother may I have a dime?" I spoke rather sharply to him not to bother me because I was busy. She opened her eyes and said, haltingly, "Couldn't he just have it?" It was the last she spoke. Needless to say he got the dime. He was about eight and a half years old at the time.

When Melvin was two months old we went to Long Beach, California, to spend the winter. Clue, Levean, Sadie, Seymour and Don had gone down in the car earlier. While we were on the train we went into the diner to eat. The Negro porter was very friendly and seemed so taken up with our baby. He said, "Boy or girl?" We told him a boy and he said, "Another little soldier, eh!" We were at war with Germany at the time the war to end wars! So I just laughed and thought there won’t be any need for him to be a soldier. But he has been. Spent four years 1942 43 44 45 in the Canal Zone. Now he has two boys and it is quite probable that they will be soldiers too.

One day down on the Pike we bought a little monkey. It had springs for legs, arms, neck and so on, so that if you held it by a string it sort of danced almost as if it were alive. We took it home and fastened it to a light globe. The house we lived in was a two story affair and when we walked around upstairs it sort of shook. So dad said, "I'll bet if we go upstairs and jump a little the monkey will look as if it is jumping." So he went up and made a little commotion and said, "Is it dancing?" Levean gave it a pull and said, "Yes." So he ran down and was so pleased with it. He sent me up to do the jumping but of course it didn't move. So a time or two he went back and eventually took me to show me how to do it right. Each time he left Levean pulled the string. He was quite disappointed when he found how we had pulled his leg.

Before grandpa Greaves died he bought a pair of goats. Why, we will never know. Soon there were four then six then eight. When this house was being built and the foundation was in, they used to march around on it. Where the openings were left for doors and windows they would each come and pause briefly and hop over. It was rhythmic almost as if to music. One day on the farm we were having a bad wind storm. We and Clue kept our cars in the machine shed with the doors securely fastened because the goats' main delight was to be on top of the cars. Clue had just paid $60 to have a new top on his car. When the wind was at its height Maree and I heard a quick honk. I said, "What was that?" Then Maree jumped up and ran and said, "Those damn goats!" Sure enough the wind had blown the door open. When we got out there eight goats were lined up on our car and facing Clue’s. His new top was in ribbons. If it had been possible for her to do it Maree would have seen them all dead then and there. She cried and beat at them until we got them back cut of the shed. Our top was strong enough to stand them. We sold the goats several times but each time got them back. Finally dad gave them to some one who lived a long way from here, and good riddance it was.

The first few years after dad and I were married we used to dress up on Halloween and tom cat around a little. Clue and Maree were married a week or so before Halloween and rented two rooms in Andrew Larsen’s house. They got it pretty well fixed up that day but still were going to sleep here at his fathers. Todd and I put on our sheets and masks and I put on a pair of his shoes so we looked like two fellows. We got down there and knocked just as they were ready to leave. It quite startled them when we walked in. We all stood around a few minutes, then dad sort of pushed against Clue. Sort of belligerently Clue said, ''Don't get funny here.." It amused us so that we burst out laughing and so gave ourselves away.

In July 1942 dad went to Brigham to work on the army hospital - Bushnell. I was with him part of the time. Carol wanted a Halloween party, so I made chili and pies and so on down there and bought her a monstrosity of a lion mask. We brought them home in time for her party. So just before her friends came dad put the mask on and went over to Howard’s and knocked on the door. Selma came and opened it. When he held out his hand and said, "Trick or treat." She said, "Well things are coming to a pretty pass when old men are out asking for treats." She had looked at his toil worn hands. So he didn't give himself away and came home greatly squelched. Afterwards she came over to look in on the party. When she saw Carol’s mask it dawned on her who had worn it over there. She said, "Darn you Todd for fooling me that way."

Little Carol Jean has such sparkling brown eyes. When I say to her, "Where did you get those pretty brown eyes?" she answers, "In the hospital."

When Melvin Jr. went to Cleveland after spending 15 months with us he stayed to help with the farm work while his father got his doctor’s degree at Carnegie Tech in Pittsburgh he knew I was worried about him making the depot change in Chicago. So after he had got moved over he sent a card telling us so. It had a picture of such a complete moron and under it ME WORRY? When Carol and the children came over I told them to come in and see what we had received from Melvin. Jeanie came running in asking what it was. I said, "His picture" and showed it to her. She just grinned and ran out. Her mother said, "What was it?" Jean said, "His picture, but it doesn't look much like him." Carol said, "Well who does it look like?" Jeanie answered, "More like daddy." We all get such a kick out of it.

When I went to Verna’s in Alamogordo to be with her at the birth of her third child Susan, Karen and the Dachshund, Dobey, were both so jealous of the baby it was sad. Charlie and Karen and I went with Newell to the hospital to bring Verna home. He brought the suit case and flowers and so forth out to the car and when he went back in Karen jumped out of the car and ran after him. He said, "You stay here while I go in and get mamma and the new baby." She just screamed "Leave that baby here." All evening she sat on her mother’s lap with her two fingers in her mouth. Dobey cried all night. Newell tried every way to console him. He coaxed him and whipped him and finally put him in the garage. After a few nights he get over it though and has been loved by Susan more than by the other children I think.

Carol and Wayne visited Verna and her family in June 1956. They told me Verna was entertaining her bridge club. She got some of her Madeira luncheon napkins out to use. Karen saw them and said, "Cloth napkins! Well isn't that a good idea. You can wash them and use them over."

All of the children have been intrigued with my dental plates. They tug at their teeth and try to take them out. Karen said, "Grandma, are they your play teeth?'' One day Toddy said, "When I get to be a grandma I am going to take my teeth out."

When Verna’s family were here in the summer of 1956 Karen said, "You are my prettiest grandma." Ha! They are sweet kids. I am just sad that I can’t be around all of my grand children oftener so they will say complimentary, cute things to me. A good thing though; the parents say I spoil them.

I cooked chickens the first day Verna’s family was here and the next day we used cold roast chicken for lunch. Charlie took a leg when we passed it around. He ate it in nothing flat and asked for more. Newell said, "What part would you like now?" He said, "That other leg." Bless his little heart! It reminded us of the "One legged goose."

After they had bought their lot in Ladera they went over often to survey and decide about the house. Charlie would always say, "Are we going out to our land?"

On little Todd’s 2nd birthday Levean gave him a little brown and yellow coat sweater. She put it on him and he preened so cute. He said, "Coat." I asked him where he got it and he said, "Ween."

Judy sucked two fingers the same as Karen used to do. When she was sleepy she would hug her blanket and put those two fingers in her mouth. While she was still sleeping in her crib bed and Jean in her twin bed they decided to trade one night. So as Carol was helping her with her prayers she prompted her to ask the Heavenly Father to help her so she could quit sucking her fingers. But as soon as she was through with her prayer in went the fingers. Carol said, "Now look here Judy, you asked the Heavenly Father to help you. You need to work at it too. Besides, if you are going to sleep in this big bed you must not suck those fingers." Immediately she jumped out of bed and ran to her own. "Me'll sleep in my own bed."

Susie went into my bedroom while they were here in 1956. Her mother was on her trail every minute because she was such a mischief bag. When she found her the little toad had my bottle of liquid make up and used for a lotion. Her hands, face, hair, the dresser scarf, the upholstery on the chair, and the rug all had a thick flesh color coating on. Verna almost cried and said, "We shouldn't have come." I told her not to cry over spilt milk. Newell and Verna got busy and cleaned it up. I don’t want my kids and grandkids to think they can’t come. They are worth more to me than material things, much more. The very happiest days of our lives are when they visit us. I will always remember that little make up covered face and hands. Bless her sweet little heart. Susan and Judy and Janet all have nice singing voices. When Susan was very little she used to sing, "Mine Bunny lies over mine ocean, Mine Bunny lies over mine seed."

A night or two before Toddy was two, Carol phoned over to see if the girls were here. I told her no. Before long I heard someone at the dining room door. I went to it and there was Toddy way after dark too. I said, "Where are Jeany and Judy?" He said, "I don’t know, " with his cute inflection on the "know". I phoned and told Carol. She said Wayne went to find the girls and Toddy followed him. When Wayne came back from Emily's where he had found the girls he hadn't known Toddy went out. When he came over to get him he was shoveling his supper in. The cute thing!

When Toddy was three Carol was doing her work at the hospital and the children were here playing in the basement. Toddy came up looking so sad and said . "I won’t play with Jeanie and Judy, because they won’t." The next morning when they came over I had dad’s lunch ready for the farm. There was a banana. Judy said, "Gwama, can I have that banana?" I said, "No dear, that is for grandpa’s lunch." She said, "Oh." So I told her she could get one out of the cupboard and share it with Jeanie and Toddy. Jeanie didn't want any. After while I was in the bed room sewing and Judy and Toddy each came in with a whole banana. I said, "I thought you were going to share one." That rascally Todd said, "I wanted Judy to have a whole one."

One day when Carol left the two little boys while she went to hospital Toddy said, "Grandma, do you wish you had some children?" I said, "I do have." He said, "I don't mean us kids; I mean some of your own." I told him I do have some of my own. Then he was surprised and wanted to know who they were. I told him Uncle Melvin, Aunt Verna and his mother. "Are they your children?" he asked. I told him they are. "Are you their mother?" I said yes. He thought a minute then said, "Well, who's their father?"

Judy was so anxious to go to Primary but there was a ruling that they couldn't go until they were four. One Primary day I went down there and she was sitting in the driveway so dejected. I said, "Why aren't you over to Primary?" She said, "I'm not foa."

One day I needed to say something to Carol. She had just left here but I figured she would have had time to get home so called. Judy answered. She said her mother wasn't home. I told her to look out and see. Then I heard her say, "Moddo, your Muddo wants you."

Verna and family came home from Menlo Park in August 1960. They and Carol’s family and Tom went to Yellowstone Park. They took tents and camped in a primitive camp. One day they drove around the loop to Old Faithful, etc. At night Verna and family and Tom wanted to go to the lecture. She suggested they buy hot dogs for supper but Carol said, "I have been to the lecture a number of times. We will hurry and eat then I will clean things up and you and Newell and the boys can go." So they did. After while Carol said, "Where are Jean and Karen?" Judy said, "They have gone to the bath room,” an outside toilet that served their camp. So after while Carol walked over and no girls, and darkness had set in. She came back alarmed andsaid, "Judy, they aren't there." Judy said, "Oh, they went to the next camp where there is a two holer."

Little Danny is a joy to us. Last year when he was only two he went with his mother and me to help move grandpa and the truck and tractor from the Moore place to Melvin’s field. He got to ride on the tractor then home in the truck. That night just before he went to sleep he said, "I helped move Bampa!" He would rather ride in that fifteen year old Dodge truck than a Cadillac or even a jet.

This last winter 1960, 61 dad and I spent three months in Cleveland with Melvin’s family. A while before we left there we got a letter from Carol’s kids. Jeanie wrote, "Dear grandma and grandpa we miss you. When are you coming home?" Judy, "I love you grandma and wish you would hurry home." Toddy, “Dear grandpa, when will you be home? We miss you. I love you." Bertha said, "Well, even if Danny can't write, he could at least have made a cross." When we came home Carol and Wayne met us in Ogden and we told them what Bertha had said. Dad said, "We brought a little gift for each of them but I guess we can’t give Danny his since he didn't write to us." It was too late to see them that night but the next morning before daylight I was fixing breakfast and I heard the kids. I looked out and they were way down the block running up here, Danny on lead and saying over and over, "I love you Gwama."

We love our ten grandchildren, from big over six foot Melvin who is in college and so artistic; Tom in high school and a radio ham; Janet, an accomplished pianist; Charles with his toads, frogs and snakes and literary ability; Karen with her art work and clarinet; Susan the singer and with the million dollar smile; Jeanie so good at the piano, and at helping her mother; Judy and Toddy both good singers; and little Dan who is a real character and lovable.

When dad and I were kids we both had outdoor plumbing as did everyone else. I remember how I hated to go out there after dark, and especially when it was cold. One of my most treasured memories of my sister Edna is that she was always willing to go with me. Never complained about it.

Dad says one night when he was going out to theirs a ghost loomed up in front of him. He stopped in terror and was about to turn back but in determination went on and was glad he had because when he came closer it was their old white horse. He seems to have had a horror of ghosts. Says as he was walking past the Yellow Jacket (the school just east of their home where all of the north end kids went to school) he could see a woman sitting there so still with her skirt waving gently in the breeze. He knew it was a ghost. He rounded up all the kids he could and when there was quite a bunch they took hold of hands and walked softly to the door. Some one had laid a class room dividing curtain over a bench. It was the "woman."

Dad’s father and his boys bought a Reeves steam engine and plows. After they had used it on the school land a while they moved it to the land they owned out in Hansel Valley, Utah. Dad and Clue and a couple of hired men took it out. It took them about ten days. They broke down almost every bridge between Winder and the valley. When night would come they would camp where ever they were. They camped one night north west of Tremonton on the hill side. They turned the horses out to graze. Before going to bed dad walked up the hill side to check on them. He stepped on a sort of softish object. He thought, horrified, "I have stepped on a dead man. Some one has killed him and left him here." He was too frightened to call but being a pretty determined character he struck a match and found a dead sheep.

When Ethel was first married she lived in a house that had an upstairs. She had one of these steel cots that had a leaf on each side to let down for a divan or raise to make a double bed. If you rolled over on the leaf it tipped the bed over. One time dad was in Salt Lake and she had him sleep upstairs on this cot. Ervin was a rail roader and was away. In the night dad rolled over and the cot tipped him onto the floor. He fixed it back and had just quieted down when he heard her call in a stage whisper, "Todd!" He said, "What do you want?" She said, "Come here." So he crawled out of bed and went to the head of the stairs. She whispered again, "Did you hear that noise?" "Hell yes," he said, "I fell out of bed."

Another time while Ethel lived there dad, Clue, and Than Eames went to California for a couple of weeks. They had stopped there on the way down. As they came back Clue and Than came on home but dad stayed in Salt Lake overnight. He went up to Ethel’s. She wasn't home so he went upstairs and slept on the same cot. When he got up in the morning and came down there was a strange woman. Ethel had moved to another furnished apartment while they were gone. You can imagine dad’s embarrassment.

Melvin suggested that I put a little history of our ancestry in my book. So I will add the following.

Ancestry of Thomas Kidd Greaves.

His grandfather, Joseph Greaves, was born in England in 1832. Since his father was a tailor it was decided that he should learn this trade too. His parents both died while he was a boy. At the age of 17 he made his home with a Latter Day Saint family and learning of their church he recognized the principles as the way to the attainment of the desires of the soul. He was baptized in 1852. Was married to Sarah Priscilla Cluley three months later on board the ship and left the day after for America and a home at the headquarters of the church. Their journey was a hard one. Joseph Greaves was 21 years of age at the time he left England, and eight of those years had been spent at tailoring, sitting on a table with legs crossed, in a stuffy tailor shop. And the months of travel across the ocean to New Orleans and up the river had not developed the muscles for walking. He walked a good deal of the way from Winter Quarters since he was appointed to help take care of and drive the cattle. Arriving in Salt Lake destitute, he had to accept any kind of available work. In the winter of 1862 63 they brought their family to Logan from Provo where they had gone with the Saints at the time the Johnson’s Army came to the valley.

Thomas Cluley Greaves was born in Provo Nov. 2, 1860. Was two years old when the family moved to Logan. Three years later his mother died. For the following three and one half years, with the help of his boys aged 11, 7, 5, Joseph did the farm work and took care of the two little sisters taking them to the fields with them. Life became easier for them. Each year as it passed showed something accomplished. Property improved and more land purchased. He worked as a mason on the Logan Tabernacle and stone cutter on the Salt Lake Temple, while the boys attended to the farm work. Life had fewer hardships for them now. Joseph Greaves went back to England to perform a mission and obtain names for genealogical work in 1881. He did some tailoring for the church members while there, so very little money was needed from home. His son Thomas was left in charge of the farm and family at home. He had grown from childhood to manhood at Logan and was educated in the public schools of the town. In the spring of 1882 he moved to Preston, Idaho and took up land two miles north of town. In 1886 he married Hannah Kidd, a native of England.

Her parents, Samuel Kidd and Mary Jane Small and children had joined the church in England. They came to Logan in 1873. Mary Jane Kidd passed away soon after the marriage of her daughter Hannah to Thomas C. Greaves. She left a newborn baby and three other little children besides those grown. So father and mother (T.C. and Hannah ) took one little boy, Hugh, to raise. Later they took Sadie who had been injured by a fall from a horse. She was always crippled curvature of the spine. These two were raised as their own children.

In 1890 he went to work for his brother, John C. Greaves in his general merchandising establishment at Preston. He worked there for nine years, carrying on at the same time his farming and stock-raising, steadily improving his farm and home. In 1903 after his return from his mission to England he formed a mercantile association with his brother J. C. Greaves and T. W. R. Nelson, under the firm name of J. C. Greaves and Co. They erected a fine business block, housing their large store, the bank of Preston and several offices. He was usually busy in some sort of business: Real Estate, Livery stable, Ford dealer and so on.

After the death of Hannah Kidd Greaves, Thomas C. married Alice Jensen George, a widow with one son, Leonard. They were married Dec. 5, 1912.

Thomas C. Greaves died at Logan May 12, 1920
Hannah Kidd Greaves was born at Jarrow on Tyne, England, March 22, 1863
and died at Preston, IdahoNov. 29, 1910

They were the parents of the following children¬:
Ethel Greaves KunzBorn May 11, 1888
Thomas KiddBorn Jan. 1, 1890(m. Harriet Johnson Oct. 12, 1916)
LeveanBorn April 20, 1892
Cluley KiddBorn Oct. 19, 1894
Seymour KiddBorn July 29, 1903
ThelmaBorn May 11, 1906Died Jan. 22, 1908
AledaBorn April 8, 1908Died July 20, 1908
Donald KiddBorn Jan. 20, 1910

Children of Thomas C. and Alice J. Greaves
VaughanBorn Dec. 20, 1913
LeoBorn March 21, 1916
ElsieBorn Nov. 6, 1919

My father was James Johnson. His parents were Danish. They heard the gospel in Denmark and were converted by Erastus Snow. They emigrated to America were the only ones in either family to join the church. One of their children died and was buried at sea. My grandfather was James Johnson. Born in Denmark March 14, 1820. Died at Hyde Park, Utah May 16, 1891. My grandmother was Mary Nielsen. Born in Denmark June 11, 1830. Died at Hyde Park March 18, 1886. They stayed in St. Louis a while to earn enough money to make the journey across the plains. But some one got their money away from them so they secured a hand cart and came with a hand cart company in 1857. My grandmother walked every bit of the way. A few days after arriving in Salt Lake she gave birth to a child. Later they moved to Brigham City. My father was born there Nov. 20, 1859.

When he was a young boy of nine or ten he had a thriving business. For a certain amount per head he herded the cattle for the whole village of Brigham; calling for the cows after milking; taking them down along the shores of the great Salt Lake and returning them to their respective owners in time for the evening milking.

Because more people were moving into Salt Lake valley the saints started branching out, and as good homesteading land was offered in Cache Valley many of these people moved there. The Johnson’s chose Hyde Park. At this time father was twelve years old. He and his eight year old brother Joseph were given the job of driving their cattle across the mountains into Cache, or Hidden Valley. Of course at that time there were no roads, nor was the land fenced or any survey lines on it. The two little boys drove the cattle through the mountains crossing passes they thought would be the easiest to get through. It took several days to make the trip and at night some kind settler along the way would give them something to eat and a place to sleep.

When my father was only nineteen years old he took his first contract for building a railroad up to Montana. He did this for three years then went to Hyde Park to marry his old sweet heart, Harriet Emaline Lamb. Her parents had come to Hyde Park from Lehi when she was a small child. She was born at Lehi, Utah Feb. 23, 1862. She was the daughter of Suel E. and Elizabeth Zimmerman Lamb. They had come to Utah from Nauvoo in the very early days of the migration.

My great grandfather, George Gottlob Zimmerman was born July 3, 1781 in Ludwigsburg, Germany. He was educated in German Universities. He spoke German, English, and French so perfectly that he could pass as a native of all three. He was also a master of the Latin tongue. During the Napoleonic wars he was drafted into service but was taken prisoner and sent to France. He was treated so kindly that he resolved not to re enter the army against the French. When he was exchanged he managed to escape on a vessel bound for America. Having no money to pay for his passage, he was sold as an indentured servant for one year to a tanner in Philadelphia. After serving his time he remained several years with this tanner then drifted into a little Dutch settlement near Harrisburg, Pa. Here he took up his profession of school teacher his life’s work. There he met and married Juliana Hoke. She was born in Wurtenburg,Germany, Nov. 25, 1798. Her father Lawrence Hoke, a carpenter, thought to better their condition financially by coming to America in 1804. He invented and patented the first threshing and winnowing machine in the United States while Thomas Jefferson was President.

George G. Zimmerman and Juliana Hoke were married April 4,1816 and lived in Franklin Co. Pa. for 27 years. The family joined the church in 1843. The next year they moved to Nauvoo, Ill. Their daughter Elizabeth, my grandmother, was born Oct. 24, 1831 in Franklin Co. Pa. Died at Hyde Park, Utah June 30, 1911. She met Suel Lamb for the first time at Garden Grove. He was the son of Erastus and Abigail Mindwell Lamb. (Descended from John Lamb who came from England with Governor Winthrop’s party.) Born in Huron Co. N.Y. March 1, 1833. While a small boy his folks joined the church and moved to Nauvoo. He helped with work on the Nauvoo Temple. He saw a great deal of the Prophet Joseph and was at the meeting when the Prophets mantle fell upon Brigham Young. One day while gathering hazel nuts he was bitten between the thumb and fore finger by a rattlesnake which nearly caused his death. He was taken to the temple and baptized and soon got well. He always bore testimony that his life was saved through faith. He crossed the plains in 1852. His father died and was buried by his family on the plains. He and Elizabeth Zimmerman were married Nov. 30, 1854 in Lehi, Utah. They moved to Hyde Park in 1865. He died there Feb. 10, 1913.

My father and mother were married Dec. 23, 1880 in the Salt Lake endowment house. They went to Montana and he contracted building on the Great Northern railroad. He was the boss of about 50 men. Mother cooked for them. After three years they came back to their little home in Hyde Park. In1884, they moved to Preston, Idaho and bought land. He was active in the Republican Party. Served as Representative and Senator in the early days of Idaho State Legislature. We are proud of his record while in the Legislature when Idaho was young and was first getting accustomed to the difficulties involved in running a new state. He helped build several canals and irrigation systems and for many years served on the board of directors of them. His last public office was as Probate Judge in Franklin County, He served two terms and retired when he had never been defeated in an election.

My father and Todd’s father were made counselors to Bishop Carver when the Third Ward was organized. They worked hard to help build the meeting house. My father and his brothers and brothers in law got out the logs and sawed them in the Chapman mill. Later father stayed and sawed for Chapman to pay for having used his mill.

When we were married my father was the Studebaker dealer and Todd’s father was the Ford dealer here in Preston.

In 1910 my father was made first counselor in the Oneida Stake Presidency. He served ten years. He died at Preston Oct. 18, 1940. Mother died at my home in Preston Feb. 19, 1933.

They had the following children:
James ErastusBorn Sept. 25, 1881
LaurenceBorn Nov. 5, 1883Died Nov. 30, 1960
Edna (Mrs. H . R . Merrill) Born May 19, 1886
LouisBorn Sept. 2, 1888
GloydBorn Sept. 8, 1892Died Oct. 16, 1892
FloydBorn Sept. 8, 1892Died June 8, 1951
HowardBorn Feb. 21, 1895
Harriet (Mrs. T. K. Greaves) Born Aug. 14, 1897
Hazel (Mrs. M. J. Christensen) Born Nov. 5, 1899
OreneBorn Oct. 12, 1904

Thomas Kidd Greaves was the oldest son of Thomas C. and Hannah Kidd Greaves. He was born at Logan, Utah Jan. 1, 1890. His folks were living at Preston, Idaho at the time, his father having homesteaded land two miles north of Preston. When he was ten years old in 1900, his father went on a mission to England. Being the oldest boy, a lot of the responsibility of the farm work fell on his shoulders. His mother was very frail. He says he often met her coming to meet him if he plowed too late. She would get worried and walk a mile or more. No wonder a ten year old boy with heavy work horses to handle.

When he was in high School he took the carpentry course and built a play house. It is true to scale and the architecture of the day. At present it is over 50 years old but still very good looking. It is in Carol’s back yard. It has always been a drawing card for children. Harriet Johnson, who later married Thomas K., used to play in it when she was a little girl. Before he was twenty years old he took his first job for a carpenter. He earned a dollar a day and worked 10 hours a day six days a week. Later he former a partnership with Hans Jensen, Contracting. They built many, many houses in and around Preston. In July 1942 during the Second World War they went to Brigham City, Utah to work on the army hospital. Thomas K. stayed six months then came back to Preston where he carried on his contracting until poor health forced him to give it up. Hans didn't came back. After he finished in Brigham he went to Ogden where he worked with his son until retirement. Both are dead now.

All of this time Thomas K. or Todd as h 
Greaves, Melvin J (I22015)
 
31 (as told to her daughter Margaret Catherine Packer Wood, compiled March 1968)

Florence Peck Packer was born May 1, 1901 in Whitney, Idaho, at her grandmother Benson's home. Her parents were Leo Peck and Adeline Benson Peck.

Brothers and sisters later born to this couple were Effie, Leo B, Maurine, Beth, Garth, and Ollie Lou.

Grandfather Peck had come in his buggy three times before Florence was actually ready to come and be his little girl. He got there just in time for Dr. Cutler to tell him they couldn't save both the Mother and the baby. Grandfather said to save the Mother of course. Grandmother Benson spoke up and said, "We'll save them both." She rolled up her sleeves (she was a midwife and knew what she was doing) and they did save both Mother and baby. Addie and Leo took their baby home to Thatcher, Idaho, in the Gentile Valley.

When Mother (I'll call her this from now on) was five the family moved to Fielding, Utah, and built a little white house that is still standing. She went to school there through the fifth or sixth grade and then made the next move out to Holbrook, Idaho (Curlew Valley). This is the place that holds some of the happiest memories of her childhood.

Grandpa Peck hired a Bother Mann to come once a month from Salt Lake City and teach to those in the valley who were interested. Effie and Mother both took from him. Grandfather also organized parents and got two teachers from Salt Lake High School to come and teach High School in Holbrook.

Effie and Mother went to Salt Lake for their first year of High School. Effie got homesick and went home a little before it was over. They were both very homesick the whole year. They lived with Aunt Rachel Campbell one block from Temple Square. The last two years of high school were in Logan, Utah, at B.Y.C. The family moved to Logan at this time and bought a home in the 300 block of East 4th North.

Mother started at the A.C., finished one semester, and had signed up to go into nurses training when she got a call to go to the California Mission.

She met her husband to be when he was playing on the basketball team for the A.C. Ezra T. Benson was also playing on that team. Mother said her interest in that team was very keen. It got to more than that because she got her diamond the Christmas before her mission call. The one drawback was that a fiancée didn't come with the ring. Dad never came to see her through the entire holidays. He called on New Years and that is the only word she had. She couldn't believe he could love her and not come to see her, so she gave the ring back. (Dad was earning money so he could get back into school and that was his big worry). When she left for her mission, she had no attachment or tie with "Grant". She didn't write or hear from him during her entire mission.

Her first mission address was 153 W. Adams, Los Angeles, California. During the summer she went to San Bernardino, the first lady missionaries to stick out the hot summer in that area. At the end of the summer, Mother's health became a problem with fainting spells and blackouts. Before it became necessary to send her home, she spent some time at Ocean Park in the L.S district. Finally, it was evident she would have to go home. The doctors in Los Angeles were the first to tell her she could never have a family.

She spent three months at home and was baptized in the temple for her health. She returned and finished her mission. When she returned from her mission, she was again in bad health. As soon as she could she went to work in a department store and met Margaret Catherine LeRoux, a catholic lady, and started a friendship she never forgot and a conversion that neither ever made, though they both tried very hard.

She returned to Logan to report her mission and saw Dad, and realized she really loved him. Effie wrote to him when they went home and said Mother had changed her mind, she thought, and if he still felt the same he should come and see her. He wrote back saying that Mother had promised if she ever changed her mind she'd let him know. Then Grandmother Peck made Effie show Mother the letter and Mother wrote Dad-- which was all Dad needed.

They were married December 20, 1923. They went back to Logan and Dad got his B.S. Degree from the A.C.

The young couple's first summer was spent in Wyoming selling knit goods. Then Dad accepted a principal's job in Eden, Utah. Their first baby, Grant Jr., was born the day school let out, May 21, 1925.

The following summer Mother spent with Lenore Petersen and her baby in an apartment in Logan while their husbands went on the road selling knit goods. The letters were almost worth the loneliness, Mother said.

Dad came back and taught one more year at Eden. Mother went early in the spring up to St. Anthony with Grandpa Packer. "That's when life really started", Mother remembered. The home had been used as a rest room for the cattle. The floor had holes in it and was anything but a honeymoon cottage. She put clean sheets on the bed and cried all night wondering what she was going to do.

They worked very hard during the summer. Mother cooked for men and changed the "rest room" into a home. They bought 25 registered Holsteins from Cache Valley to make their start. Some start, quoth Mother. The potato crop was a failure.

Leo was born (breech) November 13, 1927, in the little house down by the river. Dr. Kelly, a special nurse, Grandma Peck, Grandpa Packer and Uncle Vaughn helped welcome him. Grandpa Packer and Uncle Vaughn were there to sell the cows to make payments on the farm to try to save it. "We hung on like grim death, after that", Mother said.

Leo was five weeks old when the flood came. It was December 15, 1927. Mother waded out in freezing water above her knees. Big blocks of ice were everywhere. Mrs. Burt lost a baby that was not found until spring. Mrs. Ellingson took them and sheltered them and warmed them until Sol Hillman and Dad came and took them to town, (Dad had been teaching school). They stayed in town in an apartment until spring, then moved back in the home Mrs. Burt had occupied. There was still water in the house, the roof was sagging, and it was damp and cold. That summer they rented the farm and went out on the road again to earn enough to go back to the farm.

The Packers started out with $6.00, a tepee, a model T Ford, and two babies to make their fortune, or at least help.

This summer held many different, lonely, dangerous, and funny experiences. They would stop and camp in a clearing, often not knowing geographically where they were. Daddy would go out to sell and Mother would stay with Grant and Leo at the camp. One time Mother smelled cigarette smoke and knew there was a man or men watching her. She was alone-- alone-- in the woods with her boys. She sang to keep from being afraid. Dad finally came home and she was unharmed. She says it was from a dear lady that summer that she learned to make meringue, (for which she is now famous, at least with her family).

That fall Daddy put Mother in an apartment in Ogden and went up to move the house on the hill for her away from the danger of the river, but not far away from the beauty of it. The next summer Mother stayed at the farm but Daddy went on the road again.

In the summer of 1930 Margaret Catherine (named after Mother's dear friend Margaret Catherine LeRoux) was born into a plastered, stuckoed little house that was moved up from the river's edge.

Ossian Leonidas was born in a blizzard in Blackfoot that was so severe they had to go meet the doctor in a sleigh and the school children had to stay at the school because they couldn't get them home. Daddy was teaching in Thomas. Mother rode on top of the furniture on the trailer while moving to Blackfoot. She thinks it must have been quite a sight because she was expecting Ossian and very big.

Mother was singing a lot and had been on the Stake Relief Society board and Counselor of M.I.A. She was a favorite funeral soloist. In Thomas, Idaho, she taught Glee Club in the school. Garth came up and played his trumpet on one of their special programs.

Don Peck was Mother's first hospital baby, born in St. Anthony hospital (when it was by the river) on July 22, 1935.

When Leo was about three, he fell out of Mr. Bassett's car on the way home from June Conference between Rigby and Rexburg. The doctor scraped his skull to get the rocks and bone out. They watched him and took him to the doctor often to abstract the pieces that worked out. The doctor said if the pieces ever worked in instead of out - it would be very serious.

After the barn burned down they lost the farm and moved to Idaho Falls in the summer of 1937. They rented a home on 6th street and Mother went to the hospital in the fall. The doctor wanted to make it so she couldn't have any more children because of her poor health and he supposed this to be a good time while he was doing the other repair work. Mother said "no" and later had a dream where her sister Maurine (who had died two years ago in childbirth) had a baby and when Mother asked if it was her baby she said that the baby was Mother's. Mother's next baby was a little girl who was named Maurine, and she looked just like the baby Mother had seen in her dream.

The next year they bought a house at 508 E. 13th Street. A big old home. This is still the family home.

Mother worked in Relief Society in many stake and ward positions. Music was an important part of her life. she directed several outstanding musical programs, and directed choruses and singing mother groups for years. She soon became a popular soloist and sang for many, many funerals in the area. 
Peck, Florence (I340)
 
32 10th President of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

Joseph Fielding Smith, Jr. (July 19, 1876 – July 2, 1972) was the tenth president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) from 1970 until his death in 1972. He was the son of Joseph F. Smith, who was the sixth president of the LDS Church, and grandson of Hyrum Smith, brother of LDS Church founder Joseph Smith.

Smith was named to the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles in 1910, when his father was the church's president. When he became president of the LDS Church, he was the oldest person to hold that office until Gordon B. Hinckley reached Smith's equivalent age in June 2006 (Hinckley continued as president for another 19 months). Smith's tenure as President of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles from 1951 to 1970 is the third-longest in church history; he served in that capacity during the entire presidency of David O. McKay.

Smith was born in Salt Lake City on July 18, 1876, as the first son of Julina Lambson Smith, the second wife and first plural wife of Joseph F. Smith, then a member of the Quorum of the Twelve. By agreement between his parents, Smith was given his father's name, even though Joseph F. Smith's third and fourth wives had previously had sons. Growing up, Smith lived in his father's large family home at 333 West 100 North in Salt Lake City, Utah Territory. The house was opposite the original campus of the University of Deseret (name changed in 1892 to the University of Utah), on a site now occupied by the LDS Business College. He also often worked on the family farm in Taylorsville, Utah, as a child.

In January 1879, when Smith was two years old, the U.S. Supreme Court in Reynolds v. United States upheld the constitutionality of the Morrill Anti-Bigamy Act of 1862, which had criminalized the Latter-day Saint practice of plural marriage. Due to aggressive federal enforcement of this ruling, the Edmunds Act of 1882, and the Edmunds-Tucker Act of 1887, many LDS Church leaders, including Smith's father, were either imprisoned or forced into hiding and exile during most of the 1880s. Smith's father, as the keeper of the records of the Endowment House, felt a special need to avoid capture since the records could allow the federal authorities to easily prove polygamy charges against certain Latter-day Saint men. In January 1885, Smith's parents and his younger sister, Julina, left for the Sandwich Islands (modern Hawaii), where Smith's father had served a mission as a teenager in the 1850s. In their absence, Smith continued to live in the family home with his brothers and sisters and his father's other wives, whom he "lovingly called 'aunties'". Smith's mother returned to Salt Lake City in 1887, followed later by his father. Even after his return, Joseph F. Smith was unable to openly visit and care for his wives and children until receiving a pardon from U.S. President Benjamin Harrison in September 1891.

Smith's mother worked as a midwife to help provide for the family; she delivered nearly 1000 babies in her career without ever having a mother or infant die in childbirth. As a boy, Smith often drove his mother by wagon to the various deliveries that she attended in Salt Lake City. Smith's primary schooling took place in "ward schools", which in the 19th century were semi-formal schools run by members of each ward which taught the traditional "three R's": reading, writing, and arithmetic. As a teenager Smith completed two years of study at the Latter-day Saint College, an institution equivalent to the modern U.S. high school, which provided courses in the basic areas of mathematics, geography, history, basic science, and penmanship. After leaving the college, Smith began working as a stock clerk doing manual labor at ZCMI to supplement the family's income. Smith was present in the large assembly room of the Salt Lake Temple for its dedication on April 6, 1893, by church president Wilford Woodruff. 
Smith, Joseph Fielding Jr (I51589)
 
33 11th Governor of New Hampshire. Pierce, Governor Benjamin Jr (I90940)
 
34 11th President of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

He was eleventh president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) from July 1972 until his death in December 1973.

Lee was born in Clifton, Idaho to Samuel Lee and Louisa Emeline Bingham and was the second of six children. The Lee family lived the rural life and Lee and his siblings spent most of their youth doing farm chores. During his childhood, his mother saved him from several near-death experiences. When he was eight, he was sent to get a can of lye from the shelf and spilled the deadly product all over himself. His mother opened a vat of pickled beets and poured cup after cup of the red vinegar all over him, which neutralized the lye. When Harold was a teen, he punctured an artery on a broken bottle. His mother cleaned it, but it became badly infected. She burned a black stocking to ashes and rubbed it in the open wound and it soon healed.

Lee was fortunate to receive a good education. He finished eighth grade at a grammar school in Clifton and his parents allowed him to continue his education at Oneida Stake Academy in Preston, Idaho. The first few years, Lee focused on music and played the alto, French, and baritone horns. Later, he played basketball and was a reporter for the school newspaper. He graduated in the spring of 1916.

The summer following his graduation Lee worked to receive his teaching certificate from Albion State Normal School at Albion, Idaho. After two summers of study in 1916 and 1917, Lee passed the state's fifteen-subject test to receive his second- and third-class certificates.

Lee held his first teaching position in the fall of 1916. He taught a class of 25 students, grades one to eight, in Weston, Idaho. His salary was $60 a month. When he was eighteen, he became principal of a school in Oxford, Idaho.

In September 1920, then church president Heber J. Grant called Lee on a mission to the western states, with headquarters in Denver, Colorado. He was twenty-one and served until December 1922.

In 1930, Lee was called as president of the LDS Church's Pioneer Stake in Salt Lake City. He became the youngest stake president in the church, at that time, when he was set apart. The 1929 Great Depression in the United States left more than half of its members without jobs. He established a welfare program to aid members in distress that became a model emulated by the entire LDS Church. As part of the program, he helped organize the Pioneer Stake bishop's storehouse in 1932. The storehouse provided members with basic food necessities. Bishop's storehouses remain part of the church's welfare program today. In 1936, Lee became managing director of the Church Welfare Program. Although he also pursued a political career, he began full-time church service when he was called to the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles in 1941.

From the time he became an apostle, Lee's eventual succession to the church presidency was seen as largely inevitable, as he was almost twenty years younger than any other apostle and succession to the presidency traditionally relies on length of service among the Twelve. Spencer W. Kimball and Ezra Taft Benson soon became apostles as well, followed by Mark E. Petersen in 1944, but Lee was the senior member of the new generation.

Early in his service as an apostle, Lee served on a committee, along with two senior members of the Quorum of the Twelve, with the assignment to simplify church organization and functions. For two decades Lee studied the subject and prepared proposals, but he learned patience while awaiting the right time to implement the reorganizational concepts. The appropriate time came twenty years later when, under the direction of LDS Church president David O. McKay, the Priesthood Correlation Committee was introduced, with Lee as its chairman. Through this committee, a complete restructuring of the church organization occurred in the 1960s, with auxiliary organizations assigned a supporting role under priesthood direction.

According to some historians, Hugh B. Brown petitioned McKay to rescind the policy of excluding people of African ancestry from the priesthood. However, McKay had not felt spiritual impressions that the time was right to do so. Historians observe that Brown continued to seek to reverse the ban "administratively”, but Lee was among those who noted that it was a matter of God making his will known through revelation. In December 1969, Lee initiated a release to church leaders, signed by Brown and N. Eldon Tanner, both serving as counselors in the First Presidency, a statement that supported equal opportunities for civil rights, and that indicated priesthood policy would not change until God revealed it through revelation.

When McKay died in 1970, Joseph Fielding Smith became church president and Lee was called as First Counselor in the First Presidency. He continued to gain practical experience for what was expected to be a long presidency of his own, given the fact that he was twenty-four years younger than Smith. In 1972, Smith died and Lee became the church's president. Later that year, he organized the Jerusalem Branch and presided over the church's second area conference, held in Mexico. 
Lee, Harold Bingham (I89574)
 
35 12th President of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

He was an American business, civic, and religious leader, and was the twelfth president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church). The grandson of early Latter Day Saint apostle Heber C. Kimball, Kimball was born in Salt Lake City, Utah Territory, but spent most of his early life in Thatcher, Arizona, where his father, Andrew Kimball, farmed and served as the area's stake president. He served an LDS mission from 1914 to 1916, then worked for various banks in Arizona's Gila Valley as a clerk and bank teller. Kimball later co-founded a business selling bonds and insurance which, after weathering the Great Depression, became highly successful. Kimball served as a stake president in his hometown from 1938 until 1943, when he was called to serve as a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles.

Like most LDS Church apostles, Kimball traveled extensively to fulfill a wide variety of administrative and ecclesiastical duties. Early in his time as an apostle, Kimball was directed by church president George Albert Smith to spend extra time in religious and humanitarian work with Native Americans, which Kimball did throughout his life.

In late 1973, following the sudden death of church president Harold B. Lee, Kimball became the twelfth president of the LDS Church, a position he held until his death in 1985. Kimball's presidency was noted for the 1978 announcement ending the restriction on church members of black African descent being ordained to the priesthood or receiving temple ordinances. Kimball's presidency saw large growth in the LDS Church, both in terms of membership and the number of temples. There was also a large increase in the number of full-time LDS missionaries, as Kimball was the first church president to publicly state that the church expected all able-bodied male members to serve missions in young adulthood.

Spencer Woolley Kimball was born on March 28, 1895, in Salt Lake City, Utah Territory, to Andrew Kimball and Olive Woolley, sister of Mormon pioneer and eventual Mormon fundamentalist John W. Woolley. In 1898, when Kimball was three years old, his father was called as president of the St. Joseph Arizona Stake, and his family relocated to the town of Thatcher in southeastern Arizona's Graham County.

During his childhood, Kimball experienced a number of medical problems, including typhoid fever and facial paralysis (likely Bell's palsy), and once nearly drowned. Four of his sisters died in childhood, and his mother died when he was eleven. Though short in stature—he stood only 5 ft 6 in (1.68 m) as an adult—Kimball was an avid basketball player, and was the star and leading scorer on most of his school and recreational teams. During summer holidays, he often worked at a dairy in Globe, Arizona, milking cows, cleaning stalls, and washing bottles for $50 to $60 per month, plus room and board.

Kimball graduated from high school in May 1914, and one week later was called to serve as a missionary in the Swiss–German Mission. However, less than two months later his mission call was halted by the assassination of Archduke Ferdinand and the subsequent outbreak of World War I. Kimball was reassigned to the Central States Mission and spent most of his mission in the towns and rural settlements of Missouri, finishing in 1916 
Kimball, Spencer Woolley (I89397)
 
36 12th President of the United States.

He was the 12th President of the United States, serving from March 1849 until his death in July 1850. Before his presidency, Taylor was a career officer in the United States Army, rising to the rank of major general.

Taylor's status as a national hero as a result of his victories in the Mexican-American War won him election to the White House despite his vague political beliefs. His top priority as president was preserving the Union, but he died seventeen months into his term, before making any progress on the status of slavery, which had been inflaming tensions in Congress.

Taylor was born into a prominent family of planters who migrated westward from Virginia to Kentucky in his youth. He was commissioned as an officer in the U.S. Army in 1808 and made a name for himself as a captain in the War of 1812. He climbed the ranks establishing military forts along the Mississippi River and entered the Black Hawk War as a colonel in 1832. His success in the Second Seminole War attracted national attention and earned him the nickname "Old Rough and Ready".

In 1845, as the annexation of Texas was underway, President James K. Polk dispatched Taylor to the Rio Grande area in anticipation of a potential battle with Mexico over the disputed Texas–Mexico border. The Mexican–American War broke out in May 1846, and Taylor led American troops to victory in a series of battles culminating in the Battle of Palo Alto and the Battle of Monterrey. He became a national hero, and political clubs sprang up to draw him into the upcoming 1848 presidential election.

The Whig Party convinced the reluctant Taylor to lead their ticket, despite his unclear platform and lack of interest in politics. He won the election alongside U.S. Representative Millard Fillmore of New York, defeating Democratic candidate Lewis Cass. As president, Taylor kept his distance from Congress and his cabinet, even as partisan tensions threatened to divide the Union. Debate over the slave status of the large territories claimed in the war led to threats of secession from Southerners.

Despite being a Southerner and a slaveholder himself, Taylor did not push for the expansion of slavery. To avoid the question, he urged settlers in New Mexico and California to bypass the territorial stage and draft constitutions for statehood, setting the stage for the Compromise of 1850. Taylor died suddenly of a stomach-related illness in July 1850, ensuring he would have little impact on the sectional divide that led to civil war a decade later. 
Taylor, President Zachery (I92609)
 
37 13th President of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

He was an American farmer and religious leader, serving as United States Secretary of Agriculture during both presidential terms of Dwight D. Eisenhower and as thirteenth president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) from 1985 until his death.

Born on a farm in Whitney, Idaho, Benson was the oldest of eleven children. He was the great-grandson of Ezra T. Benson, who was appointed by Brigham Young a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles in 1846. Benson began his academic career at Utah State Agricultural College (USAC), where he first met his future wife, Flora Smith Amussen. Benson alternated quarters at USAC and work on the family farm.

Benson served an LDS Church mission in Britain from 1921 to 1923. It was while serving as a missionary, particularly an experience in Sheffield, that caused Benson to realize how central the Book of Mormon was to the Restored Gospel message and converting people to the LDS Church. On his mission, he served as president of the Newcastle Conference.

After his mission, Benson studied at Brigham Young University and finished his bachelor's degree there in 1926. That year he married Flora Smith Amussen, shortly after her return from a mission in Hawaii. They became the parents of six children. Benson received his master's degree from Iowa State University. Several years later, he did preliminary work on a doctorate at the University of California at Berkeley, but never completed it.

Just after receiving his master's degree, Benson returned to Whitney to run the family farm. He later became the county agriculture extension agent for Oneida County, Idaho. He later was promoted to the supervisor of all county agents and moved to Boise in 1930.

While in Boise, Benson also worked in the central stake extension office connected with the University of Idaho Extension Service. He also founded a farmers cooperative. Benson was superintendent of the Boise Stake Young Men's Mutual Improvement Association and later a counselor in the stake presidency. In 1939, he became president of the Boise Idaho Stake. Later that year, he moved to Washington, D.C., to become Executive Secretary of the National Council of Farmer Cooperatives, and became the first president of a new church stake in Washington.

In August 1989, Benson received the Presidential Citizens Medal from President George H. W. Bush.

Benson succeeded Kimball as President of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles in 1973, and as church president in 1985. During his early years as church president, Benson brought a renewed emphasis to the distribution and reading of the Book of Mormon, reaffirming this LDS scripture's importance as "the keystone of [the LDS] religion." He is also remembered for a general conference sermon condemning pride. 
Benson, Ezra Taft (I317)
 
38 13th President of the United States.

He was the 13th President of the United States (1850–1853), the last Whig president, and the last president not to be affiliated with either the Democratic or Republican parties. Fillmore was the only Whig president who did not die in office or get expelled from the party, and Fillmore appointed the only Whig Supreme Court Justice. As Zachary Taylor's vice president, he assumed the presidency after Taylor's death. Fillmore was a lawyer from western New York state, and an early member of the Whig Party. He served in the state legislature (1829–1831), as a U.S. Representative (1833–1835, 1837–1843), and as New York State Comptroller (1848–1849). He was elected vice president of the United States in 1848 as Taylor's running mate, and served from 1849 until Taylor's death in 1850, at the height of the "Crisis of 1850" over slavery.

As an anti-slavery moderate, he opposed abolitionist demands to exclude slavery from all the territory gained in the Mexican War. Instead he supported the Compromise of 1850, which briefly ended the crisis. In foreign policy, Fillmore supported U.S. Navy expeditions to open trade in Japan, opposed French designs on Hawaii, and was embarrassed by Narciso López's filibuster expeditions to Cuba. He sought re-election in 1852, but was passed over for the nomination by the Whigs.

When the Whig Party broke up in 1854–1856, Fillmore and other conservative Whigs joined the American Party, the political arm of the anti-immigrant, anti-Catholic "Know-Nothing" movement, though he himself was not anti-Catholic. He was the American Party candidate for President in 1856, but finished third. During the American Civil War, Fillmore denounced secession and agreed that the Union must be maintained by force if necessary, but was very critical of the war policies of President Abraham Lincoln. After the war, he supported the Reconstruction policies of President Andrew Johnson. Although some have praised Fillmore's restrained foreign policy, he is criticized for having further aggravated tensions between abolitionists and slaveholders, he is placed near the bottom 10 of historical rankings of Presidents of the United States by various scholarly surveys.

Fillmore co-founded the University at Buffalo and helped found the Buffalo Historical Society and the Buffalo General Hospital. 
Fillmore, President Millard (I91540)
 
39 14th President of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

He was an American lawyer and was the fourteenth president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) from 1994 to 1995. His nine-month presidential tenure is the shortest in the church's history. Hunter was the first president of the LDS Church born in the 20th century. He was sustained as an LDS apostle at the age of 51, and served as a general authority for over 35 years.

Hunter was born in Boise, Idaho. His father was not a Latter-day Saint (he joined the church in 1927) and would not allow his baptism until he was 12; Hunter was ordained to the Aaronic priesthood several months after he turned 12. He was the second person to become an Eagle Scout in the state of Idaho.

In March 1923, the Boise Ward, where Hunter had been a member since his baptism, was split, and he ended up in the new Boise 2nd Ward. It initially met in a Jewish synagogue that was provided free of charge. When calls were issued to build the Boise LDS Tabernacle, Hunter was the first to pledge money for the building, offering $25.

Hunter had a love for music and played the piano, violin, drums, saxophone, clarinet, and trumpet. He formed a band called Hunter's Croonaders, which played at many regional events and on a cruise ship to Asia.

Prior to his call as an apostle, Hunter held several leadership positions in the LDS Church. He was the first president of the church's Pasadena California Stake, where he had also served as a bishop.

Hunter became a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles in 1961. He filled a vacancy in the Quorum created when apostle Henry D. Moyle was added to the First Presidency following the death of First Presidency member Stephen L Richards. As an apostle, Hunter led church negotiations to acquire land in Jerusalem to build the BYU Jerusalem Center, which he dedicated in 1989.

In 1970, when Joseph Fielding Smith became president of the church, Hunter succeeded Smith as Church Historian and Recorder. Hunter held this position until 1972, and was succeeded by Leonard J. Arrington.

In November 1985, when Ezra Taft Benson became President of the Church, Hunter was named Acting President of the Quorum of the Twelve; this was in recognition of the infirmity of Marion G. Romney, who had succeeded as President of the Twelve by seniority. Hunter became President of the Quorum of the Twelve upon Romney's death in 1988.

Hunter became President of the Church in June 1994 following the death of Ezra Taft Benson. Hunter retained Gordon B. Hinckley and Thomas S. Monson as counselors in the First Presidency. Some of Hunter's contributions as church president include the creation of the church's 2000th stake and the drafting of the "Proclamation on the Family", which was released the year after his death. As president of the church, Hunter encouraged and emphasized Christ-like living and temple attendance. He dedicated two temples, the Orlando Florida Temple and the Bountiful Utah Temple, shortly before his death. 
Hunter, Howard William (I89367)
 
40 14th President of the United States.

He was the 14th President of the United States (1853–1857). Pierce was a northern Democrat who saw the abolitionist movement as a fundamental threat to the unity of the nation. His polarizing actions in championing and signing the Kansas–Nebraska Act and enforcing the Fugitive Slave Act failed to stem intersectional conflict, setting the stage for Southern secession.

Born in New Hampshire, Pierce served in the U.S. House of Representatives and the Senate until he resigned from the latter in 1842. His private law practice in his home state was a success; he was appointed U.S. Attorney for his state in 1845. Pierce took part in the Mexican–American War as a brigadier general in the Army. Seen by Democrats as a compromise candidate uniting northern and southern interests, he was nominated as the party's candidate for president on the 49th ballot at the 1852 Democratic National Convention. In the 1852 presidential election, Pierce and his running mate William R. King easily defeated the Whig Party ticket of Winfield Scott and William A. Graham.

While Pierce was popular and outgoing, his family life was a grim affair, with his wife Jane suffering from illness and depression for much of her life. All of their children died young, their last son being gruesomely killed in a train accident while the family was traveling shortly before Pierce's inauguration. As President, Pierce simultaneously attempted to enforce neutral standards for civil service while also satisfying the diverse elements of the Democratic Party with patronage, an effort which largely failed and turned many in his party against him. Pierce was a Young America expansionist who signed the Gadsden Purchase of land from Mexico and led a failed attempt to acquire Cuba from Spain. He signed trade treaties with Britain and Japan, while his Cabinet reformed their departments and improved accountability, but these successes were overshadowed by political strife.

His popularity in the Northern states declined sharply after he supported the Kansas–Nebraska Act, which annulled the Missouri Compromise, while many whites in the South continued to support him. Passage of the act led to violent conflict over the expansion of slavery in the American West. Pierce's administration was further damaged when several of his diplomats issued the Ostend Manifesto, calling for the annexation of Cuba, a document which was roundly criticized. Although Pierce fully expected to be renominated by the Democrats in the 1856 presidential election, he was abandoned by his party and his bid failed. His reputation in the North suffered further during the Civil War as he became a vocal critic of President Abraham Lincoln. Pierce, who had been a heavy drinker for much of his life, died of severe cirrhosis of the liver in 1869.

US historians and other political commentators generally rank Pierce's presidency among the worst. 
Pierce, President Franklin (I90951)
 
41 15th President of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

Gordon Bitner Hinckley (June 23, 1910 – January 27, 2008) was a religious leader and author who served as the 15th President of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) from March 12, 1995 until his death. Considered a prophet, seer, and revelator by church members, Hinckley was the oldest person to preside over the church in its history.

Hinckley's presidency was noted for the building of temples, with more than half of existing temples being built under his leadership. He also oversaw the reconstruction of the Nauvoo Illinois Temple and the building of the 21,000 seat Conference Center. During his tenure, the "Proclamation on the Family" was issued and the Perpetual Education Fund was established. At the time of his death, approximately one-third of the church's membership had joined the church under Hinckley's leadership.

Hinckley was awarded ten honorary doctorate degrees, and in 2004, he was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by George W. Bush. Hinckley also received the Boy Scouts of America's highest award, the Silver Buffalo, and served as chairman of the Church Boards of Trustees/Education. Hinckley died of natural causes on January 27, 2008, and was survived by his five children. His wife, Marjorie Pay, died in 2004. He was succeeded as church president by Thomas S. Monson, who had served as his first counselor in the First Presidency, and, more importantly, was the President of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles; therefore, according to LDS doctrine and practice, Monson was Hinckley's anticipated successor. 
Hinckley, Gordon Bitner (I87266)
 
42 16th President of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

He is an American religious leader, author, and the sixteenth and current President of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church). As president, Monson is considered by adherents of the religion to be a "prophet, seer, and revelator." A printer by trade, Monson has spent most of his life engaged in various church leadership positions and in public service.

Monson was ordained an apostle at age 36, served in the First Presidency under three church presidents and was the President of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles from March 12, 1995 until he became President of the Church. He succeeded Gordon B. Hinckley as church president on February 3, 2008.

Monson has received four honorary doctorate degrees, as well as the Boy Scouts of America's Silver Buffalo and the World Organization of the Scout Movement's Bronze Wolf—both awards the highest given in each organization. Monson is a member of the National Executive Board of the Boy Scouts of America, the organization's governing body.

Monson is chairman of the Boards of Trustees/Education of the Church Educational System, and was appointed by Ronald Reagan to the U.S. President's Task Force for Private Sector Initiatives. Monson married Frances Beverly Johnson Monson in the Salt Lake Temple in 1948 and they are the parents of three children. Frances Monson died on May 17, 2013.

Monson was born on August 21, 1927, in Salt Lake City, Utah to G. Spencer Monson (1901–1979) and Gladys Condie Monson (1902–1973). The second of six children, he grew up in a "tight-knit" family—many of his mother's relatives living on the same street and the extended family frequently going on trips together. The family's neighborhood included several residents of Mexican descent, an environment in which he says he developed a love for the Mexican people and culture. Monson often spent weekends with relatives on their farms in Granger (now part of West Valley City), and as a teenager, he took a job at the printing business that his father managed.

From 1940 to 1944, Monson attended West High School in Salt Lake City. In the fall of 1944, he enrolled at the University of Utah. Around this time he met his future wife, Frances, whose family came from a higher social class on the east side of the city. Her father, Franz Johnson, felt an immediate connection because Monson's great uncle had baptized him into the LDS Church in Sweden.

In 1945, Monson joined the United States Naval Reserve and anticipated participating in World War II in the Pacific theater. He was sent to San Diego, California, for training, but was not moved overseas before the end of the war. His tour of duty lasted six months beyond the end of the war, and after it was completed he returned to the University of Utah. Monson graduated cum laude in 1948 with a bachelor's degree in business management. Monson did not serve a full-time mission as a youth. At age 21, on October 7, 1948, he married Frances Beverly Johnson in the Salt Lake Temple. The couple eventually had three children: Thomas Lee, Ann Frances, and Clark Spencer. His wife died on May 17, 2013.

After college he rejoined the Naval Reserve with the aim of becoming an officer. Shortly after receiving his commission acceptance letter, his ward bishop asked him to serve as a counselor in the bishopric. Time conflicts with bishopric meetings would have made serving in the Navy impossible. After discussing the matter with church apostle Harold B. Lee (his former stake president), Monson declined the commission and applied for a discharge. The Navy granted his discharge in the last group processed before the Korean War. Lee set him apart six months later as a bishop—mentioning in the blessing that he likely would not have been called if he had accepted the commission.

Monson taught for a time at the University of Utah, then began a career in publishing. His first job was with the Deseret News, where he became an advertising executive. He joined the advertising operations of the Newspaper Agency Corporation when it was formed in 1952. Monson later transferred to the Deseret News Press, beginning as sales manager and eventually becoming general manager. While with Deseret News Press, Monson worked to publish LeGrand Richards's A Marvelous Work And A Wonder. He also worked with Gordon B. Hinckley, the LDS Church's representative on publications, with whom he later served in the First Presidency.

Monson became the 16th president of the LDS Church on February 3, 2008, succeeding Gordon B. Hinckley, who had died seven days earlier. Monson selected Henry B. Eyring and Dieter F. Uchtdorf as his first and second counselors, respectively. When Monson was born, there were fewer than 650,000 members of the church in the world, with most of them being based in the western United States. When he became president, there were over 13 million members worldwide, with the majority of the membership living outside the United States and Canada. As of October 2012, 31 temples announced by Monson are either under construction or in planning.

Monson and his counselors in the First Presidency met with President George W. Bush on May 29, 2008 during Bush's visit to Salt Lake City. He and apostle Dallin H. Oaks met with U.S. President Barack Obama and Senator Harry Reid in the Oval Office on July 20, 2009 and presented Obama with five volumes of personal family history records.

Monson was notably absent for a meeting other church leaders, including Eyring and Uchtdorf, had with Obama during his visit to Utah in April 2015. A church spokesperson indicated the absence, given the logistics and timing of the meeting, occurred in order to preserve Monson's strength for the church's general conference the upcoming weekend. 
Monson, Thomas Spencer (I89928)
 
43 16th President of the United States.

He was the 16th President of the United States, serving from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865. Lincoln led the United States through its Civil War—its bloodiest war and its greatest moral, constitutional, and political crisis. In doing so, he preserved the Union, abolished slavery, strengthened the federal government, and modernized the economy.

Born in Hodgenville, Kentucky, Lincoln grew up on the western frontier in Kentucky and Indiana. Largely self-educated, he became a lawyer in Illinois, a Whig Party leader, and a member of the Illinois House of Representatives, where he served from 1834 to 1846. Elected to the United States House of Representatives in 1846, Lincoln promoted rapid modernization of the economy through banks, tariffs, and railroads. Because he had originally agreed not to run for a second term in Congress, and because his opposition to the Mexican–American War was unpopular among Illinois voters, Lincoln returned to Springfield and resumed his successful law practice. Reentering politics in 1854, he became a leader in building the new Republican Party, which had a statewide majority in Illinois. In 1858, while taking part in a series of highly publicized debates with his opponent and rival, Democrat Stephen A. Douglas, Lincoln spoke out against the expansion of slavery, but lost the U.S. Senate race to Douglas.

In 1860, Lincoln secured the Republican Party presidential nomination as a moderate from a swing state. With very little support in the slaveholding states of the South, he swept the North and was elected president in 1860. His victory prompted seven southern slave states to form the Confederate States of America before he moved into the White House - no compromise or reconciliation was found regarding slavery and secession. Subsequently, on April 12, 1861, a Confederate attack on Fort Sumter inspired the North to enthusiastically rally behind the Union in a declaration of war. As the leader of the moderate faction of the Republican Party, Lincoln confronted Radical Republicans, who demanded harsher treatment of the South, War Democrats, who called for more compromise, anti-war Democrats (called Copperheads), who despised him, and irreconcilable secessionists, who plotted his assassination. Politically, Lincoln fought back by pitting his opponents against each other, by carefully planned political patronage, and by appealing to the American people with his powers of oratory. His Gettysburg Address became an iconic endorsement of the principles of nationalism, republicanism, equal rights, liberty, and democracy.

Lincoln initially concentrated on the military and political dimensions of the war. His primary goal was to reunite the nation. He suspended habeas corpus, leading to the controversial ex parte Merryman decision, and he averted potential British intervention in the war by defusing the Trent Affair in late 1861. Lincoln closely supervised the war effort, especially the selection of top generals, including his most successful general, Ulysses S. Grant. He also made major decisions on Union war strategy, including a naval blockade that shut down the South's normal trade, moves to take control of Kentucky and Tennessee, and using gunboats to gain control of the southern river system. Lincoln tried repeatedly to capture the Confederate capital at Richmond; each time a general failed, Lincoln substituted another, until finally Grant succeeded. As the war progressed, his complex moves toward ending slavery began with the Emancipation Proclamation of 1863; subsequently, Lincoln used the U.S. Army to protect escaped slaves, encouraged the border states to outlaw slavery, and pushed through Congress the Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, which permanently outlawed slavery.

An exceptionally astute politician deeply involved with power issues in each state, Lincoln reached out to the War Democrats and managed his own re-election campaign in the 1864 presidential election. Anticipating the war's conclusion, Lincoln pushed a moderate view of Reconstruction, seeking to reunite the nation speedily through a policy of generous reconciliation in the face of lingering and bitter divisiveness. On April 14, 1865, five days after the April 9th surrender of Confederate commanding general Robert E. Lee, Lincoln was assassinated by John Wilkes Booth, a Confederate sympathizer.

Lincoln has been consistently ranked both by scholars and the public as one of the three greatest U.S. presidents. 
Lincoln, President Abraham (I92743)
 
44 1787 census of Vejlby, Odense, Denmark GS#039,000

BIRTH: Vejlby Church Rec. GS#050,482

DEATH: Vejlby Church Rec. GS#050,484

MARRIAGE: Vejlby Church Rec. GS#050,483 
Madsdatter, Ane Marie (I2945)
 
45 1787 census of Vejlby, Odense, Denmark GS#039,000

BIRTH: Vejlby Church Rec. GS#050,482 
Madsdatter, Mette Cathrine (I2968)
 
46 1787 census of Vejlby, Odense, Denmark GS#039,000

BIRTH: Vejlby Church Rec. GS#050,482 
Madsdatter, Maren (I2969)
 
47 1787 census of Vejlby, Odense, Denmark GS#039,000

BIRTH: Vejlby Church Rec. GS#050,482 
Madsdatter, Birthe Margrethe (I2970)
 
48 1787 census of Vejlby, Odense, Denmark GS#039,000

BIRTH: Vejlby Church Rec. GS#050,482 
Madsen, Niels (I2971)
 
49 1787 Census of Vejlby, Odense, Denmark GS#039,000

Occupation: Small landholder

MARRIAGE: Kavslunde Church Rec. GS#050,249

DEATH: Vejlby Church Rec. GS#050,483 
Jorgensen, Mads (I2964)
 
50 1787 census of Vejlby, Odense, Denmark GS#039,000 Nielsdatter, Ane (I2965)
 

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